Doctor of Philosophy

Overview

The Mathematics Education Doctoral Program is committed to providing doctoral students with the skills, knowledge and dispositions that can ensure they are able to contribute to the global mathematics education community, and connect with other researchers (Fey, 2001). Therefore, we seek to achieve the following goals, which are adapted from Fey (2001):

The mathematics education program at the University of South Florida has a long history, with graduates dating back to the 1970s.  According to Reys, Glasgow, Teuscher, and Nevels (2008), “ A total of thirty-nine institutions graduated doctorates in each of the five decades from 1960 to 2005” (p. 10). The average number of graduates per institution is at least 4 per year, and approximately 21 students over a forty-year span. At the University of South Florida, we had 36 doctoral graduates from 1970 to 2015; more particularly, we had one person earned a doctoral degree in 1970s, six individuals earn their doctoral degree in the 1980s, nine individuals earn their doctoral degree in the 1990s, six individuals earn their doctoral degree in 2000-2008, and fourteen individuals earn their doctoral degree between 2009-2015.


Admitted students should contact the doctoral student advisor, Dr. Ruthmae Sears, for a copy of the Mathematics Education Doctoral Student Handbook.

References

Fey, J. T. (2001). Doctoral programs in mathematics education: Features, options, and challenges. In Robert E. Reys, and Jeremy Kilpatrick (Eds.),  One field, many paths:  U.S. doctoral program in mathematics education. 9, p. 55-62.  Providence, Rhodes Island: American Mathematical Society in cooperation with Mathematical Association of America.

Reys, R. E., Glasgow, R., Teuscher, D.,  & Nevels, Nevels (2008). Doctoral production in mathematics education in the United States 1960-2005. In Robert E Reys and John A. Dossey (Eds.), U. S. doctorates in mathematics education: Developing stewards of the discipline, 15, p. 3-18. Providence, Rhodes Island: American Mathematical Society in cooperation with Mathematical Association of America.