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Honors College Courses - Fall 2017

New courses are being added each week. Please check back often!

Please use the OASIS Schedule Search to see course availability. 

Honors Acquisition of Knowledge – IDH 2010

Description: This course is ONLY for incoming Freshmen in Fall 2017. This course examines various "ways of knowing" from historical, philosophical, scientific, and interdisciplinary perspectives. Ranging from classical philosophy to the digital age, the course invites students to explore the different ways in which knowledge is created and consumed, the various relationships possible between knowledge and the self, and the implications of these considerations for our understanding of individual identity.

Honors College Music Courses - IDH 2930 (0 credits)

Course Number: IDH 2930-901 (Honors Jazz Band - 0 credits) 
Day/Time: M | 5:00pm-6:15pm
Location: MUS 116

Course Number: IDH 2930-902 (Honors Chorus - 0 credits) 
Day/Time: W | 8:00pm-9:00pm
Location: MUS 207

Course Number: IDH 2930-903 (Honors Orchestra - 0 credits) 
Day/Time: R | 5:00pm-6:15pm
Location: MUS 140

Honors Arts and Humanities – IDH 3100

Course Number: 3100-001
Subtitle: Song, Story and Sculpture: Art and History in Africa
Day/Time: T/R | 9:30am-10:45am
Professor: Leslie Bessant
Description: In Africa, the arts don't just "teach" history: they make history. From simple children's songs that build community, to master works that inspire leaders to fulfill their duties to the people, the arts play a vital role in the creation and re-creation of African societies and cultures. This course will explore topics such as the roles and impacts of virtuoso jeli, or griots, in Mande-speaking West Africa; vivid three dimensional court art of Benin, Kuba, and other kingdoms; classical mbira, or thumb piano, performances in central Africa; and children's songs. Readings, weekly essays, group projects; no exams or research papers.

Course Number: IDH 3100-002
Subtitle: Reading Art: Visual, Musical, and Narrative Texts
Day/Time: T/R | 3:30pm-4:45pm
Professor: Sil Gaggi
Description: This is an interdisciplinary course in appreciation and criticism of the arts. Three major units will focus on selected examples of visual art (painting and sculpture), music (classical and popular), and narrativity (fiction and film). Close reading, viewing, and listening will be emphasized. But the approach will not be limited to formal analysis. Major themes (love, war, class, gender, and race, for example) will be treated, as they are represented in works of art of various periods and places.

Course Number: 3100-003
Subtitle: Mystery Minds: Psychology of Character and Plot Development in Genre Fiction
Day/Time: T/R | 8:00am-9:15am
Professor: Crystal Coombes
Description: Explore the craft of character development as it informs plot in classic mystery fiction genre. Review of key works of authors in this genre as well as the history of the development of the mystery fiction genre, including discussion of several well-known professional investigators and amateur sleuth characters. Join this exciting "writer's workshop" format where individual and group work will culminate in the completion of a term project that produces a publishable quality classic style mystery short story or novella.

Course Number: 3100-004
Subtitle: Theatre and Society: Text and Performance in Tampa
Day/Time: M/W | 2:00pm-3:15pm
Professor: David Frankel
Description: What makes theatre on the page different from theatre on the stage? How does theatrical representation reflect the gender, class, and political identies of contemporary society regardless of the historical origins of the text? What kinds of choices do actors, directors, and designers make that influence the audience's reception of theatrical works in performance? In this course, students will read six plays being performed in Tampa during the fall semester, meet with theatre practitioners to hear about the process of making theatre, and see the plays in performance, including two TheatreUSF productions (Little Shop of Horrors and Machinal). The other plays we read and see depend on the theatre companies (which will include the Tampa Repertory Theatre, Jobsite Theater, and Stageworks) and their schedules. The class will also include opportunities for student performances to further explore the nature of the plays. No theatre experience or background is required. Students can expect to pay about $90 for scripts and $60 to $70 dollars for theatre tickets. Some of the performances are off-campus.

Course Number: 3100-005
Subtitle: Who Needs Identity: Politics of Music, Culture and Belonging
Day/Time: M/W | 11:00am-12:15pm
Professor: Angsumula Tamang
Description: Music, in general, is often viewed as a form of passive entertainment. However, studies in music demonstrate that it not only effects our interpretation of the world, but also how we articulate our values and assumptions about ourselves and others. In addition to exploring music as an important signifier of identity, culture, and/or belonging, this course will examine the role of music as a dynamic socio-political phenomenon that offers interesting opportunities to analyze negotiations of power within the context of class, caste, gender, place, region, religion, nation, and the diaspora. Students will be assigned readings that deal with music studies from Scotland, Ireland, Australia, Brazil, India, Poland, Bulgaria, Afghanistan, U.K., Egypt, Niger, and China. This course will also require students to critically engage with ideas of representation and music as an ideology that often involve undertaking strategic and contingent positions.
No prior knowledge of music or musical terms is required for this course.

Course Number: 3100-006
Subtitle: It's Only Rock 'n' Roll, but I like it: Music and American Society
Day/Time: T/R | 3:30pm-4:45pm
Professor: Lina Chaves
Description: From Elvis to Aerosmith to Nirvana, rock music has provided much of the soundtrack for American life. This course will examine the ways rock music has shaped and was shaped by the political, social and cultural currents of American Society during the last half of the twentieth century. Beginning with the roots of rock and roll in Jazz Age and working toward the present day, we will examine the development of rock music and American history simultaneously to uncover the ways music has informed understandings of race, class, gender, and sexuality. This course combines the use of primary sources (music videos, concert footage, etc.) and critical readings from a variety of disciplines (musicology, sociology, history) to fuel our in-class discussions.

Course Number: 3100-007
Subtitle: Dark Media, Ghosts, and the Supernatural
Day/Time: F | 9:30am-12:15pm
Professor: Wesley Johnson
Description: This course will be an investigation of media artifacts, processes, and theories that examine the interface between the normal and the supernatural or the known and the unknown. We will examine a range of examples - in fiction, film, TV, comics, and videogames - of media used in unorthodox and fantastical ways. In some cases media reinforce the existence of the supernatural. In other cases, media themselves become haunted, or strangely function as a communications portal to the realm of demons, ghosts, and the undead. We will discuss Spirit Photography and move across literature, media studies, haunted houses, and haunted media in Japanese horror. Along the way, we will discuss theories of media both new and old asking how they serve as both boundary and passage between science and the supernatural. In addition to writing and reading, students will create their own dark media artifacts.

Course Number: 3100-008
Subtitle: Culture, Continuity, Crisis and Change: Tampa in Transformation
Day/Time: F | 9:30am-12:15pm
Professor: Catherine Wilkins
Description:
Culture: Over the course of millennia, humans have developed a multitude of practices - including agriculture, colonization, urbanization, and industrialization - that have helped our species thrive, allowing culture and civilization to emerge and flourish.
Continuity: Since the first people settled in this area more than 10,000 years ago, Tampanians have been both adapting to and seeking to adapt our natural environment. Cultural and community practices distinct to Florida have evolved as a result; some of which developed in harmony with the natural environment, while others have been incredibly destructive to local ecosystems and animal species.
Crisis: Now, the fallout from some of these local and global practices threatens our survival, along with that of many other species. The ongoing transformation of the biosphere on both land and sea has led to climate changes (such as habitat loss, melting glaciers & rising seas), mass extinctions, and conflict over natural resources. Coastal Floridians are not only complicit in these events, but we will also face serious, lifestyle-changing consequences from them. While change is not unfamiliar to Tampanians, the scope, magnitude, and implications of the current ecological crisis are new.
Change: This moment asks us for reflection, collaboration, creativity. As inhabitants of Tampa, where do we find ourselves? What do we make of our current situation, and predictions about our future? What should we do about it? That is the shared enterprise of this course.
This course is team-taught; both sections will share a meeting space, course materials, and instructors and we will collaborate together on events, experiences, and projects. Dr. Wilkins' focus will be on the history of Tampa with an eye for understanding how people have interacted with the native environment over time, exploring the origins of current cultural and community identities, beliefs, and behaviors, and learning lessons from the past that can help us in the present. Dr. Bush's approach will be more future-oriented, drawing on Tampa's historical identity to generate strategies for transformation: new lifestyles that enable Tampanians to not only survive but thrive in this ongoing time of change.

Honors Natural Sciences – IDH 3350

Course Number: IDH 3350-001
Subtitle: Natural Science in the Real World: Changemaking & Wicked Problems
Day/Time: R | 2:00pm-4:45pm
Professor: Michael Cross
Description: Students will be introduced to connections between fundamental concepts in the physical and life and sciences to wicked problems involving human and environmental issues. This course is team-taught; both sections will share a meeting space and course materials. Students will form cross-course teams from a variety of disciplines to address opportunities using a trans-disciplinary approach. Namely, you will learn, engage, and execute methods from the natural and social sciences to solve problems that encapsulate the physical world, biological systems, social groups, individuals, and human behavior.

Course Number: IDH 3350-002
Subtitle: Micoorganisms, Diseases and Host Responses
Day/Time: T/R | 8:00am-9:15am
Professor: Steven Specter (USF College of Medicine)
Description: In this course students will develop a basic understanding of the different types of microorganisms and their differentiating characteristics as well as the basics of the host immune response. Students should gain some background on how microorganisms and humans interact in the development of disease and immunity to disease. The course will focus on applications of this information to everyday life and a general understanding of the topics at a level that accommodates the needs and interests of both non-science majors and science majors.

Course Number: IDH 3350-003
Subtitle: Science Fiction, Science Fact
Day/Time: F | 9:30am-12:20pm
Professor: Kevin Mackay
Description: This is a seminar style course exploring facts and fiction in the astronomy media. We will explore a selection of science fiction movies and novels along with Art and popular culture which has an astronomy basis and we will critique the ideas presented. Students will explore what is fact, what is feasible and what is pure fiction and will have the opportunity to express their learning via a class project which may have a scientific or artistic emphasis.

Course Number: IDH 3350-004
Subtitle: Aesthetics of Science
Day/Time: F | 9:30am-12:20pm
Professor: Michael Cross
Description: "The scientist does not study nature because it is useful to do so. They study it because they take pleasure in it, and they take pleasure in it because it is beautiful."
– Henri Poincaré
What does science mean to you? What does science mean to you? In this course we will explore in what, where, and how scientists find beauty. Examples of scientists we will survey include Galileo Galilei, René Descartes, Henri Poincaré, Niels Bohr, Werner Heisenberg, Thomas Kuhn, Paul Medawar and John Dupré. We will engage in the philosophy, practice, and process of scientific research through projects that incorporate art and design elements to evaluate real-world problems.

Course Number: IDH 3350-005 or IDH 3350-008
Subtitle: Physical Geography
Day/Time: M/W | 12:30-1:45pm (005) or T/R | 2:00pm-3:15pm (008)
Professor: Peter Nkhoma
Description: This course is an introduction to the principles of Physical Geography. The course focuses on geophysical processes of the natural environment. The discipline of Physical Geography is concerned with all aspects of the natural world, the dynamism and forces of the natural world, as well as the interplay with human endeavors. Physical Geography embraces a scientific approach to understanding the natural world, to explaining global features and processes, and to synthesizing the interaction between human and natural environments. It is not merely descriptive, though many landforms evoke emotional responses, but a systematic approach to understanding and explaining our world. The course focuses on five major themes: (1) atmosphere; (2) lithosphere; (3) biosphere; (4) hydrosphere; and (5) cryosphere. This course is not abstracted, it deals with real processes of the natural world and incorporates examples of real events such as earthquakes, floods, tropical storms, mass movements (e.g., landslides).

Course Number: IDH 3350-007
Subtitle: Geology of National Parks
Day/Time: M/W | 11:00am-12:15pm
Professor: Judy McIlrath
Description: Why do we have public lands set aside as National Parks? What geologic processes created the variety of landscapes so unique that our predecessors mandated that those landscapes be preserved? In our growing need for natural resources, should we exploit the resources of the parks? Students will have the opportunity to express their learning by researching a national Park of their choice as a term project which may have both a scientific and creative emphasis. An optional field trip to several National Parks, most likely in Arizona, will be a consideration for the enthusiastic!

Honors Social/Behavioral Sciences – IDH 3400

Course Number: IDH 3400-001
Subtitle: Biopsychosocial Components of Behavior and Health
Day/Time: M/W | 3:30pm-4:45pm
Professor: Melvin James
Description: Only those on the approved list will be given a permit to register for this course (see Mr. Mejias if you have any questions). This course is only for Sophomores in the 7-yr med program -- permits have already been given. You must be on the approved list in order to take this course! This course provides scientific inquiry, reasoning skills and content areas for the Psychological and Social Foundations of Behavior for the new MCAT 2015. In this course, human behavior and illness are viewed from a systemic rather than a reductionist perspective. The combination of biological, psychological and social determinants, and their contributions to behavior and health, is examined from critical analysis and evidence-based problem solving approaches.

Course Number: IDH 3400-002
Subtitle: Peace, Power and International Relations
Day/Time: T/R | 11:00am-12:15pm
Professor: Steven Turner
Description: Think like a World Leader! Everyone knows that bad things happen in the world, and that the worst things happen in conflicts between countries. It doesn't make sense! But actually it does make sense, from the perspective of the leaders and their security advisors, who are responsible for your security. You won't get this perspective from the news media, unless you know where to look—the same places that the leaders look. In this class we will see how the world works day by day, what signaling and the balance of power are all about, understand the basic ideas that leaders and security advisors work with, and, even better, apply these ideas in a simulation of great power conflict in Europe. You will get to be a leader and think like a leader in a collaborative project of keeping your country safe.

Course Number: IDH 3400–003
Subtitle: Fertility and the Future
Day/Time: T/R | 9:30am-10:45am (3400-003) or M/W | 3:30pm-4:45pm (IDH 3400-009)
Professor: Holly Singh
Description: This course approaches family-making as a bio-cultural process, addressing claims to the universal and the particular in reproduction. How do gender, class, race, and religion shape reproductive ideals and practices around the world? How do difficulties in reproduction, ranging from infertility and pregnancy loss (miscarriage) to natural disaster and political upheaval, impact those ideals and practices? And how do examinations of fertility from afar through demography, politics, and ethics articulate with intimate, embodied (and dis-embodied) experiences of reproduction, from adoption and abortion to IVF and surrogacy? The course will examine these issues across a variety of geographic contexts and situate local examples within national and global struggles to (re)produce the future.

Course Number: IDH 3400-004
Subtitle: Bayesian Data Analysis
Day/Time: M/W | 11:00am-12:15pm
Professor: Ken Malmberg
Description: Life is uncertain. Meteorologists provide a 75% cone of uncertainty when forecasting hurricane landfalls. Nate Silver at 538.com revolutionized political forecasting by providing a real time probability of election outcomes. In sports, Las Vegas sets the odds prior to a sporting event, and on-line sites provide play-by-play updates to the win probabilities. How do they do this? Why are the predictions sometimes not accurate? You will learn the answers to these questions and learn how to generate them yourself, from theory to coding to analytics

Course Number: IDH 3400-005
Subtitle: Plagues
Day/Time: T/R | 12:30pm-1:45pm
Professor: Linda Whiteford
Description: This course is designed for those interested in medicine, disease, biology, history and culture. It will include information drawn from paleopathology, forensics, the archaeological record, epidemiology, and medical anthropology to guide students through an understanding of the forces that have- and still do – contribute to global plagues and our human responses. We will consider outbreaks such as the black plague, ebola, cholera, syphilis, malaria, dengue, and zika.

Course Number: IDH 3400–006 or IDH 3400–008
Subtitle: Science, Art, and Justice: A Social Autopsy
Day/Time: M/W | 9:30am-10:45am (006) or T/R | 9:30am-10:45pm (008)
Professor: Ulluminair Salim
Description: Is justice truly blind? Social Autopsy examines the science of criminality and justice by asking how science and society are co-constitutive of truth(s). Through case studies and readings, field experiences, and eye-witness "testimonies" from experts in disciplines as diverse as Anthropology, Criminal Justice, and Genetics, students will investigate intersections of science, art, and justice from multiple vantage points. Among other topics, this interdisciplinary course will survey the ways in which forensic technologies and advances in neuroscience influence social conceptions of guilt, innocence, at-riskness, and justice. Finally, Social Autopsy will provide opportunities for honors students to address the representational politics of forensic art by creating their own visualizations; interrogate the authenticity claims of DNA profiling and eye witnessing; and examine how social biases influence what and how we see.

Course Number: IDH 3400-007
Subtitle: Changemaking & Wicked Problems: Projects in Social Innovation
Day/Time: R | 2:00pm-3:15pm
Professor: Alan Bush
Description: Do you have a desire to tackle some of the most intractable problems to our community? Do you thrive on tackling complex problems with others? Are you a changemaker? Would you like to be? Problems are "wicked" when it is difficult to tease out cause and effect, reasonable people to disagree on what constitutes a just response, and any solution may have unintended consequences. Changemakers are practical visionaries, working to generate solutions to some of society's most intractable problems. Changemakers understand how to reframe wicked problems into solvable opportunities and marshal collaborative teams to support their work. This course enables students to develop as changemakers through a hands-on exposure to some of the foundational skills to engagement with wicked problems. The course involves:

  • Community groups posing challenges for student teams
  • Employing design thinking to generate strategy to respond to a real-world problem
  • Collaborating with community organizations & students from diverse backgrounds

Students taking the IDH 3400 Social/Behavioral Sciences section will be introduced to connections between theoretical and empirical frameworks in the social and behavioral sciences to wicked problems involving human and environmental issues. This course is team-taught; both sections will share a meeting space and course materials. Students will form cross-course teams from a variety of disciplines to address opportunities using a transdisciplinary approach. Namely, you will learn, engage, and execute methods from the natural and social sciences to solve problems that encapsulate the physical world, biological systems, social groups, individuals, and human behavior.

Course Number: IDH 3400-008
Subtitle: Science, Art, and Justice: A Social Autopsy
Day/Time: M/W | 9:30am-10:45am (006) or T/R | 9:30am-10:45am (008)
Professor: Ulluminair Salim
Description: Is justice truly blind? Social Autopsy examines the science of criminality and justice by asking how science and society are co-constitutive of truth(s). Through case studies and readings, field experiences, and eye-witness "testimonies" from experts in disciplines as diverse as Anthropology, Criminal Justice, and Genetics, students will investigate intersections of science, art, and justice from multiple vantage points. Among other topics, this interdisciplinary course will survey the ways in which forensic technologies and advances in neuroscience influence social conceptions of guilt, innocence, at-riskness, and justice. Finally, Social Autopsy will provide opportunities for honors students to address the representational politics of forensic art by creating their own visualizations; interrogate the authenticity claims of DNA profiling and eye witnessing; and examine how social biases influence what and how we see.

Course Number: IDH 3400-003 or IDH 3400-009
Subtitle: Fertility and the Future
Day/Time: T/R | 9:30am-10:45am (003) or M/W | 3:30pm-4:45pm (009)
Professor: Holly Singh
Description: This course approaches family-making as a bio-cultural process, addressing claims to the universal and the particular in reproduction. How do gender, class, race, and religion shape reproductive ideals and practices around the world? How do difficulties in reproduction, ranging from infertility and pregnancy loss (miscarriage) to natural disaster and political upheaval, impact those ideals and practices? And how do examinations of fertility from afar through demography, politics, and ethics articulate with intimate, embodied (and dis-embodied) experiences of reproduction, from adoption and abortion to IVF and surrogacy? The course will examine these issues across a variety of geographic contexts and situate local examples within national and global struggles to (re)produce the future.

Course Number: IDH 3400-010
Subtitle: Get Innovative: The Habits of Mind that Foster Creativity
Day/Time: M/W | 2:00pm-3:15pm
Professor: Sarah Kiefer
Description: What is innovative thinking? We often assume that innovative thinking is the result of one person's irrepressible creative genius bursting forth to change the ways we think, act, or create. Innovative thinking is often thought of as an inborn and unchangeable trait. However, research indicates there are habits of mind associated with innovation and creativity, habits that everyone can work to develop and refine. This course provides you an exceptional opportunity to investigate innovative and creative thinking from the inside out and discover for yourself what these habits are and how to use them effectively. By examining and analyzing the processes of a series of illustrious guest lecturers – each a recognized innovator – and selected case studies, you will discover the habits and processes that lie at the heart of innovation and creativity.

Honors Seminar in Applied Ethics – IDH 3600

Course Number: IDH 3600-001
Subtitle: Fake News and "Post-Truth:" Philosophical Problems of Real World Journalism
Day/Time: F | 9:30am-12:20pm
Professor: Carlin Romano
Description: Over the past year, many issues usually battled about in a "Philosophical Problems of Journalism" course became front-page news. Does truth matter any more to reporters? Are the media "enemies of the people"? Do journalists lack a fundamental moral code and often write fiction? Are facts hard or squishy things? This seminar, taught by nationally known philosopher, journalist and public intellectual Carlin Romano, who will be visiting USF as a Distinguished Professor, brings philosophical thinking to bear on a journalistic world in crisis.

Course Number: IDH 3600-002
Subtitle: Bio-Medical Ethics
Day/Time: T/R | 8:00am-9:15am
Professor: John Dormois
Description: You must be pre-approved in order to register for this course. This seminar in applied medical ethics will cover a variety of subjects that will be primarily practical rather than purely philosophical. Topics to be explored include: experimentation on human subjects, access to care, health care disparities, abortion, and the right to die. The primary objective will be to develop a method for approaching ethical issues in medicine. Students will be primarily responsible to leading discussions with minimal formal lecturing.

Course Number: IDH 3600-003
Subtitle: Bio-Medical Ethics (Not for 7-yr Med Students)
Day/Time: M | 2:00pm-4:45pm
Professor: David Diamond
Description: This course is NOT for 7-yr Med students! This course focuses on health-related research involving flawed experimental designs, experimenter bias, financial conflicts of interest and data manipulation that has led to misinformation involving health-related recommendations. Students will be guided to identify poorly designed studies and deception in medical research that has compromised the validity of the findings. Students will give oral presentations in which they will present chapters from the two textbooks, as well as topics of their own interest. Each class will involve a discussion in which routine health-related practices will be challenged as to whether they are based on myths versus strong evidence-based research Grading will be based on the quality of the student's oral presentations of book chapters, data papers and their participation in class discussions. Each student will also write a term paper.

Course Number: 3600-004
Subtitle: Body Ethic: Practice, Place and Community
Day/Time: M/W | 12:30pm-1:45pm
Professor: Benjamin Young
Description: It has become a common place in both popular culture and rigorous scientific thinking alike to conceive of human experience as the result of brain processes. Just like the stomach results in digestion, so too the brain is thought to result in experience and behavior. A common metaphor that captures this way of thinking is to conceive of the brain as the "hardware" on which the "software" of thinking runs. This way of understanding the relationship between human physiology and experience has been challenged by some of the most cutting edge research in a variety of disciplinary contexts (esp. from cognitive science, neuroscience, social science, theory of art, meta-ethics, and phenomenology).

The emerging counter narrative understands the human brain as only part of a wider network of environmental, physiological, perceptual, social, historical, and semantic relationships that together make our familiar first person experience possible. The locus of understanding, according to this account, is neither the physical processes of the brain nor the pure "thinking" of subjective experience, but rather, the "lived body." As a whole, our body affords the horizon of both perception and action. It is, in short, the permeable border between self and world. To understand both our inner mental life and our environment it turns out, we need to understand how our bodies shape both.
This course is organized around the eudemonistic ethical tradition, which asks: What is the most choiceworthy and flourishing life? As our guide to these emerging ideas about the body, therefore, we will follow the suggestive clues provided by the way we cope in some of the most meaningful aspects of our lives (personal identity and friendship, work and play, love and competition, practice and habit, feeling at home and anxiety, fear and skillful mastery, desire and repulsion, design and improvisation, etc.). Guided by these experiences, our aim is to explore these emerging ideas about the body in an "applied" ethical context with regards to how we inhabit the everyday practices, places, and communities that shape the quality of our lived experience.

This course should be of interest to all those concerned to draw on some of the most cutting edge interdisciplinary research on human experience and cognition to inform their own personal practice, community engagements, academic interests, and professional ambitions. The course will likely be of particular interest to those cultivating professions in medicine and health related disciplines aimed at caring for bodies and persons. The course should also be of particular interest to those interested in design (architecture, art, engineering, community planning, etc.) and performance (sports, theater, music, etc.). You should expect ample opportunity to explore your own topical fascinations through the core ideas developed in this course in both seminar discussions and assignments. Related topics that you might choose to explore through the lens of the core ideas include (but are not limited to): artificial intelligence, bioengineering (and post-humanism), marketing technology and ethics, business and institutional origination, representation of bodies in art and advertising, extended cognition and technology, emotions and the body, education and the body, dance as thought, urban design, bodies and communication, sustainable bodies and places, etc.

Course Number: IDH 3600-005
Subtitle: Why is it so Hard to Understand Politicians?: Influences on Political Decision Making and Leadership Styles in a 21st Century Congress
Day/Time: F | 9:30am-12:20pm
Professor: David Jolly (former U.S. Congressional Representative)
Description: From candidate to Member of Congress, this course examines the influences on political decision making, with a general focus on those who seek or serve in the United States Congress. The course will study the shifting evolution of qualifications for successful candidates from prior to the information age through today's electoral structure, including present day campaign finance laws, the impact of district lines, and the impact of closed primary systems. Further studies will focus on competing philosophies regarding responsibilities for representation of both political majority and political minority constituencies, voter captivation with authenticity compared to voter expectation of traditional candidacies, internal influences within Congress on an individual legislator's decision making, and the impact of the press, social media, endless election cycles, and non-political priorities of a candidate or Member of Congress.

Course Number: IDH 3600 - 006
Subtitle: "Go to Jail or Work Like Hell": Methods of Effective Environmental Advocacy
Day/Time: F | 9:30am–12:15pm
Professor: Lance Long (Professor of Law, Stetson Law School)
Description: Do you have to break the law to be an effective environmental advocate? While civil disobedience is a prominent part of today's environmental advocacy, resolving the world's most pressing environmental problems, such as climate change, loss of biodiversity, and the pervasive use of environmental toxins, usually requires hard work within the legal system. This course will provide an overview of various strategies—both legal and extralegal—for addressing environmental problems and discusses the practical and ethical problems surrounding those strategies. As part of the course, students will choose and implement a strategy to address an environmental problem that most concerns them. These strategies include legal, regulatory, legislative, media-based, and collaborative methods. While students are prohibited from engaging in any illegal or extra-legal action in connection with the class, the efficacy of such methods will be addressed.

Course Number: IDH 3600-008
Subtitle: Civic Literacy and Current Events
Day/Time: R | 2:00pm-4:45pm
Professor: Daniel Ruth
Description: This course will examine the week's current events and explore our civic institutions of local, state and federal government. Students will be expected to come to class well-versed in the days breaking news events and be prepared to discuss these issues in class. There is no textbook. Students will be required to read The Tampa Bay Times, listen to National Public Radio and watch various news programs. There will be a weekly quiz. Students also will be divided into teams and take turns preparing a weekly presentation on some news topic. There will also be an end-of-semester project presentation.

Honors Geographical Perspectives – IDH 4200

Course Number: IDH 4200-001
Subtitle: Japan
Day/Time: T/R | 3:30pm-4:45pm
Professor: Atsuko Sakai
Description: Japan is like a "period" at the end of a sentence. Whether it is religion, culture or technology, Japan was often the final destination for any movements flowing East. Traveling through other countries and eventually crossing the ocean, these movements morphed overtime reflecting the geological and geographical context of places passed through. It reminds you of the children's game "whisper down the valley." In a country about the size of California it has approximately 40% of the U.S. population. Standing in busy Tokyo it is hard to imagine Japan as an island, but it has made a difference both positively and negatively throughout its history—not many countries could have closed off their borders even if they wanted to, but for a while Japan did. Thus, everything from the governmental structure to the overall culture both traditional and modern was created by a unique mixture of the indigenous culture of an island and the outside influences of other countries, of course, the United States being one of them. This course starts with an overall introduction to history, language, political structure, socio-economical frameworks, and geological features, and then moves onto various cultural aspects. The purpose of the course is not only to build geographical knowledge about Japan, but also to draw multiple perspectives by examining the complexity of a country and the relationships with other countries. The challenge was and is balancing between its own originality and the adaptation of outside influences, and ambitions. "Zipangu" once known as the "land of gold" in The Travels of Marco Polo now has many cultural traditions to share from the tea ceremony to art and architecture as well as an exciting visual pop culture.

Course Number: IDH 4200-002
Subtitle: Africa in Historical Context
Day/Time: T/R | 8:00am-9:45am
Professor: Leslie Bessant
Description: Six hundred years ago, African empires were rich and powerful, centers of international trade and learning. Today, Africa is plagued by political instability, violence, and poverty. This course aims to explore how this dramatic change came about. Taking the era of the great empires as our baseline (ca. 900 CE - 1660), we will assess the impact of the slave trade and colonial rule on African life. Our investigation will focus on three questions: What did the slave trade and colonial rule destroy? What, if anything, did African societies gain? And what aspects of African life survived? Readings include African oral traditions, songs, and novels.

Course Number: IDH 4200-003
Subtitle: Sub-Saharan Africa: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives
Day/Time: T/R | 9:30am-10:45am
Professor: Fenda Akiwumi
Description: This course will look at culture, societies and development in Sub-Saharan Africa in historical and contemporary context. It will be a broad interdisciplinary introduction to the study of this part of the African continent. Africa's history, politics, cultures, and societies are rich, diverse, and complex yet generalizations and negative stereotypes about Africa by the media, academics, and policy-makers are common (apocalyptic scenarios of civil war, poverty, famine, diseases such as AIDS and failed states, for example). Using selected case studies we will explore political, economic, and socio-cultural characteristics of both modern and traditional Africa and through critical evaluation of course materials obtain a more balanced portrayal of the continent and its development.

Course Number: IDH 4200-004
Subtitle: Cities of the Global South
Day/Time: T/R | 11:00am-12:15pm
Professor: Alan Bush
Description: A majority of humans who have ever lived are alive today. The majority of those alive today live in cities, most of whom live in cities of the Global South. What does that mean? The dominant experience of being human is that of life in these new, complex & rapidly transforming cities. The purpose of the course is to explore cities like Jakarta, Cape Town, Delhi, Lagos, Mexico City & Saõ Paolo as a diverse but cohesive geography. To do so, the course uses a highly collaborative workshop structure. Student teams will draw on art, storytelling research & data visualization to discern patterns the physical, ecological, economic, social & cultural landscapes of these remarkable Cities of the Global South.

Course Number: IDH 4200–005
Subtitle: Histories of Healing in South Asia
Day/Time: M/W | 2:00pm-3:15pm
Professor: Holly Singh
Description: This course focuses on the long and varied historical trajectories of healing in South Asia, from the ancient development and practice of systems such as Ayurveda, Unani, Yoga, and folk systems to manage illness and promote health to the introduction and proliferation of biomedicine. Through the examination of how laypeople have engaged these systems and how governments have patronized, promoted, and politicized healing practice and health promotion during centuries of shifting rule, the course will explore culture, health, and healing. It will address how local and global power relations influence the dynamics of healing over time and across diverse regions of South Asia. The course builds toward, for example, critical analysis of medical tourism to South Asia, the globalization of yoga, and public health crises in contemporary South Asia.

Course Number: IDH 4200-006
Subtitle: Russia Between East and West: Empire, Revolution, Ideas and Geopolitics
Day/Time: M/W | 12:30pm–1:45pm
Professor: Christopher Stroop
Description: When West European diplomats and traders began publishing accounts of their visits to Muscovy in the late sixteenth century, they wrote of a "rude and barbarous kingdom" very different from their home countries. In April 2014, the Russian Ministry of Culture, headed by Vladimir Medinsky, released an official document proclaiming that "Russia is not Europe," but represents, rather, a distinct civilization that is morally superior to the ostensibly "decadent" West. Neither the statements of the early modern Western travel writers nor those of the current Minister of Culture of the Russian Federation should be taken at face value. They can, however, serve to illustrate the perennial contentiousness of the meaning of Russianness — both to outside observers and to Russians themselves, whose self-conscious engagement with the meaning of Russian identity and the role of Russia in the world has expressed itself in art, literature, and scholarship, as well as in the terrorism, violence, and grand messianic visions, both sacred and secular, associated with various revolutionary and utopian projects. Vladimir Putin's Russia — still the world's largest country, spanning 11 time zones within which numerous peoples speak over 100 distinct languages — cannot be understood without delving into the history of controversial attempts to define Russia's identity and purpose. Including early modern, Russian imperial, Soviet, and post-Soviet material, this course invites us to do just that, along with examining the related issues of empire and geopolitics over the longue durée. In it, along with relevant scholarly literature, we will discuss a variety of primary sources, including examples of Russian literature and philosophy.

Course Number: IDH 4200-007
Subtitle: Music and Culture of South Asia
Day/Time: M/W | 9:30am-10:45am
Professor: Anshu Tamang
Description: This class will cover the musics and cultures of South Asia. We will begin with India and move on to Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Afghanistan, and Sri Lanka. Acknowledging that each nation-state showcases a variety of music genres and musical practices, this course will highlight more than one genre of music – classical, folk, religious, and/or popular – from each country. The course will introduce basic concepts of listening to musics from South Asia and highlight the role of music as a discourse to mark and legitimize notions of political, regional, religious, and national belonging. In addition, readings will focus on theoretical discussions and critical analysis to garner a deeper understanding of how music production constitutes the social, cultural, and historical realities of South Asia. No prior knowledge of music or musical terms is required for this course.

Course Number: IDH 4200-008 or IDH 4200-014
Subtitle: Global Food Security
Day/Time: M/W 9:30am-10:45am (008) or T/R | 3:30pm-4:45pm (014)
Professor: Peter Nkhoma
Description: Food insecurity is one of the most critical issues of our time, in 2015 there were 793 million undernourished people globally. Food insecurity is primarily caused and driven by poverty, although there are other related multiple causes. The key objective of this course is to review and discuss factors (barriers to food production and access) that affect food and nutrition security at various scales – at the global, national, and household level. With regional and local focus on sub-Saharan Africa and Tampa, respectively. By the end of the course students will have a sufficient grasp of, inter alia, the economic, political, climatic, cultural, and environmental causes of food insecurity; and how food insecurity is differentially experienced across class, and space and time. The course is built around interactive lectures, individual student research, class discussions, and a final research paper.

Course Number: IDH 4200-009
Subtitle: Australia
Day/Time: F | 9:30am-12:15pm
Professor: Tony Erben
Description: What does it mean for persons living inside the settler nation of Australia to call themselves Australian? What are the historical and cultural roots of Australianness and why does this matter in a globalised world? These questions form the main basis of a unit that considers Australia through a variety of disciplinary lenses, including anthropology, history, cultural studies and sociology. Using key cultural practices such as art, sport, national celebrations, music, film and tourism as focal points, the unit aims to facilitate understanding of the foundational myths of Australia. Australia is far enough away from the rest of the world to hold a certain level of mystery for the uninitiated. The distances, the animals, the geography and history of the largest island continent have over the past 200 years framed its people and guided the development of an innovative creative and oftentimes brash people. While Australia, the country, is relatively young, the continent is ancient. This course will introduce students to all aspects of Australian life, culture, flora and fauna. More importantly, this course will raise student' awareness and appreciation through the perceptive and amusing tales of an American tourist who has re-visited Australia numerous times over the past decade and has learned something new with each visit. His tales shall be the starting point for our collective discovery of this fascinating continent called Australia. The text that will be used is Bill Bryson's "In a Sunburned Country". The professor for the course is Australian....so expect this course to be brash, uplifting and creative!

Course Number: IDH 4200-010
Subtitle: Contemporary Middle East: Political Challenges in a Global age.
Day/Time: T/R | 12:30pm-1:45pm
Professor: Nazek Jawad
Description: Recently, the Middle East is conceived as a region that breeds fundamentalism and an area of long lasting conflicts. Due to the distorted notions and misrepresentations of the Middle East circulated and promoted in corporate media, and in conventional media outlets as well, this course is set into a great mission. This course aims to provide students with an authentic understanding of the diversified multi-layered facets of the Middle East, and to expose them to the breadth of Middle Eastern cultures, and their political and cultural landmarks within historical and contemporary contexts. This course discusses the main social, economic, and political developments in the Middle East from the 19th century onward. Topics to be covered include, but are not limited to: colonial legacies; Islamic Sharia Laws, identity politics, social movements, Arab uprisings, women and politics in the Middle East, terrorism, and development. Besides, this course also highlights the Middle East abundant culture, and introduces students to countless contributions of Middle East countries to human civilizations in wide range of areas, including science, arts, architecture, and music.
The aim of this course is to broaden students' intellectual perspective by introducing them to the geography, history, politics, political economy, culture, and arts of the Middle East. Another equally important goal of this course is to impart appreciation of cultures other than their own, by introducing them to the diversified cultures of the Middle East.

Course Number: IDH 4200-011
Subtitle: Ukraine: Social and Cultural Landscapes
Day/Time: T/R | 11:00am-12:15pm
Professor: Nana Tuntiya
Description: Thrown into the middle of geopolitical controversy surrounding Crimea and its rebellious East, Ukraine remains largely unknown to its Western supporters. The country's rich and complex history, its evolving relationship with a powerful neighboring nation, Russia, shaped the cultural backdrop against which the recent events are unfolding. This course will look into significant experiences that helped form public attitudes, traditions, and social practices throughout the Ukrainian turbulent past. It will also explore the population make up of this largest country in Europe by land mass, and its struggle to overcome the remnants of the soviet regime. The focus of the class is on society and its culture rather than politics, with the aim of understanding the attitudes and the aspirations that are building a way for the future of this Eastern European nation.

Course Number: IDH 4200-012
Subtitle: Cyprus: Birthplace of Aphrodite and Strategic Key to the Middle East
Day/Time: M/W | 12:30pm-1:45pm
Professor: William Ditewig
Description: This course is intended to acquaint students with the cultural and strategic importance of this beautiful island country in the Easter Mediterranean Sea. The course investigates the complex history of the island of the gods, through the shipwrecks of St. Paul, the naval intrigues of the Venetians (including the tragedy of Shakespeare's Othello) the crusading adventures of Richard the Lionheart of England, and the importance of Cyprus in contemporary strategic matters in Middle Eastern politics. This course will have something for everyone!

Course Number: IDH 4200-013
Subtitle: Geographies of movement, (dis)location, difference, & hybridity: focus on South Asian diaspora
Day/Time: T | 2:00pm-4:45pm
Professor: Hema Ramachandran
Description: In this course, we will critically examine the notions of and practices around nation, diaspora, and identity, using the South Asian diasporic phenomena in the USA, Canada, and Britain as exemplary instances to unpack and deconstruct these concepts. How do individuals and communities recreate themselves in other shores often imagining a "home nation" outside physical boundaries and tangible reference points? Is "diaspora" a fundamental condition of identity and belonging in the 21st century? Has it ever been otherwise? Does the sense of "in-between-ness" always carry a progressive enabling political charge or does it also force folks to hunker down into rigid cultural fixities? You are strongly encouraged to bring your own questions and we will attempt to grapple with these issues via a focus on cultural production including theoretical and literary texts, films and videos. You will be expected to participate enthusiastically in student-led debates and discussions and you will write thoughtful papers and create innovative projects including media productions on topics of your choice. Come prepared to be enlightened and entertained!

Course Number: IDH 4200-015
Subtitle: Global Perspectives in Health: The Dominican Republic
Day/Time: M/W | 9:30am-10:45am
Professor: Lindy Davidson
Description: In this geo-perspectives course, students will explore the many factors contributing to health in the Dominican Republic. Throughout the semester, we will consider political, economic, environmental, structural, and cultural perspectives that impact health in the Dominican Republic. At the end of the semester, students will have the opportunity to participate in the Honors Service Trip to the Dominican Republic, where we will work with the Kerolle Initiative for Community Health. On the trip, students will serve in mobile medical clinics, stay in homes with community members, and participate in service projects to improve the overall health of the communities in and around Sosúa. Students enrolling in this course should plan to participate in the ten-day service trip in December. Pre-med, engineering and fine arts students are encouraged to enroll. Permit required. Please contact Dr. Davidson for more information: lindyd@honors.usf.edu.

Course Number: 4200-16
Subtitle: Classical Epic and Politics in India
Day/Time: M | 5:00pm-7:45 p.m.
Professor: Gil Ben-Herut
Description: For more than two millennia Indians have been reading and retelling the Mahabharata, an epic tale of a sanguine royal family feud. In this seminar, we shall delve into the manifold versions, visions, and voices of the Mahabharata and consider their relation to different political and social contexts in pre-modern and modern India. (This course is cross-listed with a graduate course offered through the department of Religion. Please contact Dr. Bingham if you are interested: bingham@usf.edu)

HONORS SPECIAL TOPICS (NOT AN HONORS COLLEGE CORE CLASS) - IDH 4930

Course Number: IDH 4930-002
Subtitle: Digital Identity
Day/Time: T/R | 2:00pm-3:15pm
Professor: James Hatten
Description: We live in a digital society. Our digital footprints, shadows, and personae play an important part of who we are as individuals, as a society, and in the overarching human condition. The Digital Identity course allows students to examine themselves, others, society, and humanity through a critical lens. In addition to theories and foundations of digital identity, students will create a final project that demonstrates their skill in using digital tools. Course content will draw students into important discourse about an important topic and provide them with tools to self-assess their identity in a digital society. Topics covered include identifying digital identity, managing digital identities, investigating marginalized digital identities, and self-governing of digital identities. This project-based course also relies heavily on class discussion.

Course Number: 4930-006
Subtitle: Backstage Pass to Health Professions
Day/Time: M | 4:00pm-4:50pm
Professor: Donna Petersen
Description: If you are interested in learning more about interprofessional health teams, please join Dr. Donna Petersen, Dean of the USF School of Public Health in this 1 credit Special Topics course on this Spring semester. As a student in this course, you will rotate among interprofessional teams that consist of a variety of health professionals. Class time will be devoted to discussions about these experiences and assignments.

Course Number: IDH 4930-009
Subtitle: Public Health in the Daily News
Day/Time: W | 12:00pm-12:50pm
Professor: Kay Perrin
Description: This interactive course explores how public health is represented in the daily news. During this seminar, the students learn how to: a) separate fact from fiction; b) investigate if the report is based on evidenced-based practice; c) discover the breadth and depth of public health in their daily lives. Class will be taught in the College of Public Health.

IDH 4950

Course Number: IDH 4950-002*
Subtitle: Low-literacy Skills: Its Impact on Professional Effectiveness
Day/Time: T/R | 12:30pm-1:45pm
Professor: Rebecca Puig
*You must submit the Honors College Thesis Agreement Form to Dr. Bingham to receive a permit for this course.
Description:
lit-er-a-cy / ˈlidərəsē,ˈlitrəsē/ noun quality or state of being literate

Like many words in the English language today, the word literacy has taken on an entirely different meaning than how it was used twenty-years ago. Politicians, researchers, and teachers have invented the phrases financial literacy, computer literacy, health literacy and adult literacy to identify and define what skills are needed in each area to be considered competent in that space. Literacy is no longer just about the ability of an individual to read, but the need for specialized skills to successfully go about their daily lives. Whether you plan to be a doctor, nurse, physical therapist, lawyer, psychologist, economist, journalist, scientist, or ......, low-literacy skills will impact the effectiveness of your professional endeavors. This course is designed to provide you with an awareness of the impact low-literacy skills will have on your work, whether you are providing a service or conducting research. As a professional, the assumption is that your patients, clients, and/or readers can comprehend your materials, follow directions, and make informed decisions. Do you have any idea how many adults are functionally illiterate in the United States; unable to read, write, or perform mathematical skills above the third-grade level? Would you recognize their lack of skills? How would you go about modifying your oral and/or written communications to meet their needs without embarrassing them by asking if they can read? Students will have an opportunity to meet with local literacy organizations, volunteer to teach adults to read, and conduct research in adult, financial, health and computer literacy.

Course Number: IDH 4950-003*
Subtitle: Design Thinking
Day/Time: T | 2:00pm-4:45pm
Professor: Fred Steier and Travis Thompson
*You must submit the Honors College Thesis Agreement Form to Dr. Bingham to receive a permit for this course.
Description: What is it like to design a new "app"? An exhibit at a science center? A sustainable community? A global organization that inspires creative confidence? A university? A new home for refugees? A collaborative communication process for designing any of these? This course will develop and explore key ideas of design thinking, including how it relates to design practice. We will focus on design in a very broad sense, as an interdisciplinary approach to problem solving, whether those problems are seen as social, technical, or rooted in the arts and humanities. To situate design thinking as a form of collaborative problem solving, we will grapple with questions of creativity and innovation rooted in contexts of democratic participation and intercultural understanding by inquiring into how problems get defined as problems. In other words, we will study "messes" as a way to look at questions of problem definition, explored across boundaries. As this course is rooted in learning-by-doing, we will study "messes" in both theory and practice! We will have several projects that will be the basis of our design thinking, with the projects involving potential community partners. These may range from issues involved in lives of refugees to the design of learning spaces (including our own learning spaces) to community building in both a geographical and human sense. In these projects we will focus on issues of design process, communication in design teams, collaboration, and also human values that underlie good design thinking. In other words, the course will involve innovation, creativity, and serious play! For questions or more information on this serious play, please contact Dr. Frederick Steier (fsteier@usf.edu) or Dr. Travis Thompson (tthompson@usf.edu).

IDH 4970

Course Number: IDH 4970-002
Subtitle: Culture, Continuity, Crisis and Change: Tampa in Transformation
Day/Time: F | 9:30am-12:15pm
Professor: Alan Bush
Description:
Culture: Over the course of millennia, humans have developed a multitude of practices - including agriculture, colonization, urbanization, and industrialization - that have helped our species thrive, allowing culture and civilization to emerge and flourish.
Continuity: Since the first people settled in this area more than 10,000 years ago, Tampanians have been both adapting to and seeking to adapt our natural environment. Cultural and community practices distinct to Florida have evolved as a result; some of which developed in harmony with the natural environment, while others have been incredibly destructive to local ecosystems and animal species.
Crisis: Now, the fallout from some of these local and global practices threatens our survival, along with that of many other species. The ongoing transformation of the biosphere on both land and sea has led to climate changes (such as habitat loss, melting glaciers & rising seas), mass extinctions, and conflict over natural resources. Coastal Floridians are not only complicit in these events, but we will also face serious, lifestyle-changing consequences from them. While change is not unfamiliar to Tampanians, the scope, magnitude, and implications of the current ecological crisis are new.
Change: This moment asks us for reflection, collaboration, creativity. As inhabitants of Tampa, where do we find ourselves? What do we make of our current situation, and predictions about our future? What should we do about it? That is the shared enterprise of this course.
This course is team-taught; both sections will share a meeting space, course materials, and will collaborate together on events, experiences, and projects. Dr. Wilkins' focus will be on the history of Tampa with an eye for understanding how people have interacted with the native environment over time, exploring the origins of current cultural and community identities, beliefs, and behaviors, and learning lessons from the past that can help us in the present. Dr. Bush's approach will be more future-oriented, drawing on Tampa's historical identity to generate strategies for transformation: new lifestyles that enable Tampanians to not only survive but thrive in this ongoing time of change.

Course Number: IDH 4970-003
Subtitle: Connections: Mental Healthcare, Community Engagement and Art
Day/Time: R | 3:00pm-5:45pm
Professor: Catherine Wilkins
Description: In this collaboration between the USF Honors College and the Tampa Museum of Art, Honors students learn about medical conditions such as dementia, depression, and PTSD and are trained to facilitate interactions with works of art for patient groups dealing with these diagnoses. The program is based on the Meet Me at MOMA Alzheimer's Project, which strove to make art accessible to people with dementia, and has been highly successful and lauded by healthcare professionals, museum staff, and participants alike. This class will train students in the Visual Thinking Strategies method of art exploration, which allows participants to give their own personal interpretations of works of art without fear of judgment or failure. Particularly in people with Alzheimer's, depression, and PTSD, this method has been found to help patients access and express memories, practice or regain their communication skills, externalize emotions, relieve stress and anxiety, and promote positive emotions. This capstone course will allow students to participate in furthering the research in these areas by providing an immersive experience at the intersection of art, medicine, and mental health. This class will also instruct students in the practices of observation, deep listening, and critical thinking, build empathy and understanding, and engage students with the community. Please note that this class meets at the Tampa Museum of Art – please allow time for traveling back and forth when you are planning your schedule. Transportation is not provided.