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Honors College Courses - Spring 2018

New courses are being added each week. Please check back often!
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Honors Acquisition of Knowledge – IDH 2010

Section Number: IDH 2010-002
Subtitle: Acquisition of Knowledge

Day & Time: Tuesday/Thursday | 12:30pm-1:45pm
Professor: Benjamin Young
Description: This course examines various "ways of knowing" from historical, philosophical, scientific, and interdisciplinary perspectives. Ranging from classical philosophy to the digital age, the course invites students to explore the different ways in which knowledge is created and consumed, the various relationships possible between knowledge and the self, and the implications of these considerations for our understanding of individual identity.

Honors Arts and Humanities – IDH 3100

Course Number: IDH 3100-001
Subtitle: Mandala: The Art and Science of Composition
Day & Time: Tuesday/Thursday | 11:00am-12:15pm
Professor: Atsuko Sakai
Description: A "composition" is a "balance" we create. We constantly try to make sense out of something we encounter everyday. We seek not only physical comfort (a balance between our body and our surroundings) but also mental stability within the individual and with others throughout a day. We will go for a meditative journey of an interdisciplinary study which integrates human perception and Eastern thoughts through the study of traditional Mandala Art from various countries including India, China, Korea and Japan. Mandala is an art for meditation, teaching, and the visualization of a cosmology—Eastern world views in particular. Everyday we communicate with visualized ideas such as symbols, logos, diagrams, etc., especially on screen like emoji, or stories with manga, anime and graphic novels. But, how can you come up with these images and compose an organized graphic design, for example, your research poster in order to present your research concept, data, systems, models, and results, or to share emerging ideas that are not even clear in your mind yet? Together we will study compositional theories for visual and spatial designs, and explore various hands-on activities to create your Mandala art, which will eventually become your very own holistic understanding of our world.

Course Number: IDH 3100-002
Subtitle: Illumination—Installation: Playing with Light and Shadow
Day & Time: Tuesday/Thursday |12:30pm-1:45pm
Professor: Atsuko Sakai
Description: There is a beautiful Japanese tea ceremony that starts out with our eyes following the subtle glow of a flickering candle held by the host who quietly makes his entrance behind a shoji screen—we then realize the ceremony has started. It is quite amazing that we have this ability to detect the fine lines and surfaces of an object with very little light, and this "light" is the very tool of our interdisciplinary play in this course. We will start with historical analysis of light including examinations of various artworks to observe the different ways light was used and recognized in each work. Imagine the time when French Impressionists first introduced natural light into their paintings—how bright and shiny! Then, we move onto the contrasting world of "shadow" in different places. Our world used to be quite dark and being an electrician was a very dangerous job. "Lighting" is one of the most critical elements of spatial design which affects our daily functions and mood. How do architects and designers utilize light to create a specific atmosphere for specific places such as hospitals, schools, offices and churches? Can a good lighting design help patients recover faster in healthcare environments? Light is physical. Thus, we will test the effects of light by exploring various creative projects throughout the semester, and together, we will also install an illumination exhibition using the magic of light, shade and shadow.

Course Number: IDH 3100-003
Subtitle: New Media, Art and Culture
Day & Time: Monday/Wednesday | 12:30pm-1:45pm
Professor: Catherine Wilkins
Description: For the past two hundred years, technology has been transforming traditional creative practices. From the invention of photography in 1827 to the advent of video games and virtual reality, this course will explore the evolution of "new media" such as these from a historical perspective, while also examining the key theoretical issues in the past and present philosophy and practice of New Media Arts. In so doing, the course will provide students with a critical analytical framework for approaching the contemporary media culture that we interact with on a daily basis. Additionally, we will seek to expand upon these commonplace experiences with "new media" through unusual hands-on projects, such as building a camera obscura and creating a virtual reality app.

Course Number: IDH 3100-004
Subtitle: Song, Story and Sculpture: Art and History in Africa
Day & Time: Tuesday/Thursday | 9:30am-10:45am
Professor: Leslie Bessant
Description: In Africa, the arts don't just "teach" history: they make history. From simple children's songs that build community, to master works that inspire leaders to fulfill their duties to the people, the arts play a vital role in the creation and re-creation of African societies and cultures. This course will explore topics such as the roles and impacts of virtuoso jeli, or griots, in Mande-speaking West Africa and vivid three-dimensional court art of Ife, Benin, Kuba, and other kingdoms. We may even sing ourselves, just to see what happens to our community when we share our voices. Readings, weekly essays, group projects; no exams or research papers.

Course Number: IDH 3100-005 and 3100-006
Subtitle: The End of the World as We Know It? Apocalypse and Dystopia in Life, Art, and Geopolitics
Day & Time: Monday/Wednesday | 9:30am-10:45am (005) OR Monday/Wednesday | 2:00pm-3:15pm (006)
Professor: Christopher Stroop
Description: Are we living in particularly apocalyptic times? Looking to popular culture, we might well conclude that the answer is yes. Whether it's The Hunger Games, Game of Thrones, Lord of the Rings, or, for members of America's large rapture-believing Evangelical subculture, Left Behind, we seem to crave visions of decline and/or epic redemptive violence. The times are such that we are even capable of bizarrely turning Alice in Wonderland, originally a delightful work of entertaining nonsense, into an apocalyptic tale of Good vs. Evil that ends with an oddly admiring nod to the British Empire (see Tim Burton's 2010 film adaptation). Looking to post-Cold War geopolitics might lead us to a similar conclusion. 1990s optimism has been increasingly replaced with a sense of dread as Russian-American relations have declined to their lowest point since 1962; foreign intellectuals and politicians increasingly question the viability of American leadership in the world; and the U.S. president—a role whose occupant was until very recently ipso facto widely regarded as the leader of the free world—uses Twitter to settle petty scores and threaten North Korea with nuclear war.

So, how did we get here, what can we do about it, and how might the study of twentieth-century history and contemporary art, literature, and film, help us better understand the challenges of twenty-first century global citizenship? What makes apocalyptic thinking attractive, and what are the connections between fantasy and reality? Does geopolitics imitate art? What are the political implications of apocalyptic thinking, and is secular eschatology any potentially less destabilizing than overtly religious eschatology? Starting from the consensus of historians that apocalyptic visions prove increasingly attractive in times of rapid change and concomitant upheaval and instability, and engaging works of history, political science, film, and literature with a focus on Russia, America, Christianity, and the Cold War and its aftermath, this course will address these questions and more. I could give you 666 more reasons to sign up for this course, but instead I'll simply ask: can you handle the revelations sure to unfold as we explore the end of the world?

Course Number: IDH 3100-007
Subtitle: Theatre and Society: Text and Performance in Tampa
Day & Time: Tuesday/Thursday | 11:00am-12:15pm
Professor: David Frankel
Description: What makes theatre on the page different from theatre on the stage? How does theatrical representation reflect the gender, class, and political identies of contemporary society regardless of the historical origins of the text? What kinds of choices do actors, directors, and designers make that influence the audience's reception of theatrical works in performance? In this course, students will read six plays being performed in Tampa during the spring semester, meet with theatre practitioners to hear about the process of making theatre, and see the plays in performance, including two TheatreUSF productions (The Crucible and She Kills Monsters). The other plays we read and see depend on the theatre companies (which will include the Tampa Repertory Theatre, Jobsite Theater, and Stageworks) and their schedules. The class will also include opportunities for student performances to further explore the nature of the plays. No theatre experience or background is required. Students can expect to pay about $90 for scripts and $60 to $70 dollars for theatre tickets. Some of the performances are off-campus.

Course Number: IDH 3100-008
Subtitle: Who Needs Identity: Politics of Music, Culture and Belonging
Day & Time: Tuesday/Thursday | 11:00am-12:15pm
Professor: Angsumula Tamang
Description: Music, in general, is often viewed as a form of passive entertainment. However, studies in music demonstrate that it not only effects our interpretation of the world, but also how we articulate our values and assumptions about ourselves and others. In addition to exploring music as an important signifier of identity, culture, and/or belonging, this course will examine the role of music as a dynamic socio-political phenomenon that offers interesting opportunities to analyze negotiations of power within the context of class, caste, gender, place, region, religion, nation, and the diaspora. Students will be assigned readings that deal with music studies from Scotland, Ireland, Australia, Brazil, India, Poland, Bulgaria, Afghanistan, U.K., Egypt, Niger, and China. This course will also require students to critically engage with ideas of representation and music as an ideology that often involve undertaking strategic and contingent positions. No prior knowledge of music or musical terms is required for this course.

Course Number: IDH 3100-009
Subtitle: From Poe to Peele: The History of Horror
Day & Time: Friday | 9:30am-12:15pm
Professor: Wesley Johnson
Description: In this course, we will explore horror, one of the most enduring and provocative literary genres. Our texts will draw from prose, poetry, film, television, gaming, music, and popular culture. We will examine themes, conventions, structures and historical contexts in an attempt to understand how and why this genre persists. We will focus on defining a much-maligned genre and examining where horror sits in culture at large. Beginning with traditional literary texts and ending with experimental and popular media, horror has proven a malleable medium for addressing social taboos. As such, our discussions will include death, sex and reproduction, madness, the body under duress, the fear of the other, as well as what it means to be human—and what lies beyond. Tentative authors include Poe, Jackson, and Morrison; films may include Insidious, The Eyes of My Mother, The Descent, Raw, Green Room, The Loved Ones, Pontypool, and Get Out.

Course Number: IDH 3100-010
Subtitle: It's Only Rock 'n' Roll, but I like it: Music and American Society
Day & Time: Tuesday/Thursday | 2:00pm-3:15pm
Professor: Lina Chaves
Description: From Elvis to Aerosmith to Nirvana, rock music has provided much of the soundtrack for American life. This course will examine the ways rock music has shaped and was shaped by the political, social and cultural currents of American Society during the last half of the twentieth century. Beginning with the roots of rock and roll in Jazz Age and working toward the present day, we will examine the development of rock music and American history simultaneously to uncover the ways music has informed understandings of race, class, gender, and sexuality. This course combines the use of primary sources (music videos, concert footage, etc.) and critical readings from a variety of disciplines (musicology, sociology, history) to fuel our in-class discussions.

Course Number: IDH 3100-011
Subtitle: Literary Myths of the Modern World: Hamlet, Faustus and Don Juan
Day & Time: Monday/Wednesday | 3:30pm-4:45pm
Professor: David Arbesu
Description: In this course we will analyze three of the most important literary archetypes of western literature (Prince Hamlet, Dr. Faustus, and Don Juan), and we will discuss why their stories have continued to be adapted, reworked, and reinvented over the course of the last 400 years. These characters belong to a group of archetypes labeled Myths of Modern Individuality, and to give you but one example of their enormous influence, the last appraisal of the adaptations of the Don Juan legend gives us an estimate of 4,500 works, which means that there was at least one new version of the Don Juan myth every month since the beginning of the 17th century (!). Likewise, the number of reworkings and adaptations of the story of Dr. Faustus and Prince Hamlet is similar to that of Don Juan, so imagine the influence that these three characters alone have had on the literature and culture of the Western World.

Course Number: IDH 3100-014
Subtitle: The Rise of EDM: Music, Culture and Fashion
Day/Time: Monday/Wednesday | 8:00am-9:15am
Professor: Calvin Falwell
Description: This course will explore how in the early 20th century, composers began redefining the concept of instruments and organized sound, in turn redefining music, with modernism, futurism and postmodernism, ultimately leading music into a new era. We will dive head first into EDM (Electronic Dance Music) and its collection of subgenres, such as House, Drum n Bass, Dubstep, Trap, and Hardstyle. Since the 1980s the genre had been dormant in the nightclub scene. However, in recent year, the demand for EDM has taken the music industry by storm. The course will also explore the advances in technology that led to the production and synthesis of electronic music. Students will even have the chance to produce their own one-minute dance track using programs such as Garageband and Audacity -- programs that are a direct result of years of industry advances. Lectures will discuss how dance music has evolved and how social media such as YouTube and SoundCloud Assisted in fueling interest in electronic music. We will also discuss how promoters and venues realized DJs could generate larger profits than traditional musicians and how EDM festivals like Electric Daisy Carnival and Defqon grew in size, emphasizing the visual experiences, such as video and light effects. Guest speakers include USF music composition faculty, graphic artists and local DJs. Special projects include concert/festival reviews. Creation of one's own EDM track and concert poster.

Honors Natural Sciences – IDH 3350

Course Number: IDH 3350-001
Subtitle: Science/Technology/Society Interaction
Day & Time: Tuesday/Thursday | 3:30pm-4:45pm
Professor: Barbara Spector
Description: There is significant need for research scientists, physicians, and other health professionals to appreciate their potential roles in communicating with the public. Further, there is a need for professionals in all disciplines to assist teachers in using the community as a resource for teaching science. This course is organized as an inquiry into the question, "What is STEM (and STEAM) (science, technology, engineering, art, and mathematics) interaction with society, and how does it relate to science-based professionals communicating with educators and the public? It is structured as "flipped classroom", in which contact hours are used for students to engage in discussion with each other and the professor. Information input is delivered outside of class via a virtual resource center on the Web. All the print and multi-media materials for study are housed in Canvas. (There is no textbook to purchase).

Thus it is a hybrid course for three credits with approximately 20 face-to-face contact hours and the remaining 25 contact hours for studying and communicating via Canvas. Among the major threads are human health and climate change, health of the ocean, communications among scientists, engineers, and educators, and STEM education in formal k-16 institutions and informal science education institutions. Opportunity exists for each participant to address STEM topics of his/her specific interest. The intended outcome is for a participant to generate his/her own grounded theory of the way science, technology, engineering , art, mathematics and society interact and ways to communicate STEM/STEAM related topics of his/her personal interest to a variety of audiences. Past participants in this course stated, "It is a critical thinking class instead of just scientific terms and is friendly to non-science majors as well as science majors."

Course Number: IDH 3350-003
Subtitle: Science Fiction, Science Fact
Day & Time: Friday | 9:30am-12:20pm
Professor: Kevin Mackay
Description: This is a seminar style course exploring facts and fiction in the astronomy media. We will explore a selection of science fiction movies and novels along with Art and popular culture which has an astronomy basis and we will critique the ideas presented. Students will explore what is fact, what is feasible and what is pure fiction and will have the opportunity to express their learning via a class project which may have a scientific or artistic emphasis.

Course Number: IDH 3350-004
Subtitle: Climate Change Today
Day & Time: Tuesday/Thursday | 11:00am-12:15pm
Professor: Peter Wilson
Description: This course looks at many aspects of climate change, from how we measure global temperatures, how the Polar regions affect climate, how fast the oceans are warming, sea level rise and as accurate a prognosis as we have today on Earth.
The cryosphere plays an especially large role in ocean circulation and so weather patterns everywhere. The Arctic is warming very fast - we look at why this might be and conversely why might Antarctic ice be seemingly growing rather than receding in some regions. We look closely at Larsen C and its recent iceberg, slightly larger than Connecticut.

Course Number: IDH 3350-005
Subtitle: Great Debates: Debating Environmental Policy in an Age of Populism
Day & Time: Monday | 2:00pm-4:45pm
Professor: Tim Dixon
Description: Political changes in Great Britain and the United States indicate that populism is on the rise around the globe. As news becomes more politicized and politicians cater to their base, the willingness to engage in real policy debate is being lost to catch phrases, gotcha questions, and sound bites. This course will explore environmental policy issues facing the country and how populism and partisanship have altered the environment surrounding environmental policy debates. We will use three lenses to evaluate these issues: scientific – what does the scientific evidence tell us?; policy analysis – what are the tradeoffs to specific solutions?; and rhetoric – how should these issues be explained and publically debated to gain popular support? The course will train students in policy analysis skills used by elected leaders and their staffs, and provide experience actually debating these topics using sound rhetoric and reasoning.

Course Number: IDH 3350-006
Subtitle: Geology of National Parks
Day & Time: Monday/Wednesday | 11:00am-12:15pm
Professor: Judy McIlrath
Description: Why do we have public lands set aside as National Parks? What geologic processes created the variety of landscapes so unique that our predecessors mandated that those landscapes be preserved? In our growing need for natural resources, should we exploit the resources of the parks? Students will have the opportunity to express their learning by researching a national Park of their choice as a term project which may have both a scientific and creative emphasis. An optional field trip to several National Parks, most likely in Arizona, will be a consideration for the enthusiastic! *This course will meet in CMC 147, not in ALN.

Honors Social/Behavioral Sciences – IDH 3400

Course Number: IDH 3400–001
Subtitle: Science, Art, and Justice: A Social Autopsy
Day & Time: Tuesday/Thursday | 9:30am-10:45pm
Professor: Ulluminair Salim
Description: "Artists, in a sense, are the antibodies of the cultural bloodstream." –Bill McKibben

Social Autopsy examines the art and science of justice by asking how science and society are co-constitutive of truth(s). Through case studies and readings, field experiences, and engagement with guest activists from diverse academic and professional disciplines, students will investigate intersections of science, art, and justice.

This interdisciplinary, workshop-based course will survey contemporary social issues ranging from the rights and responsibilities of (biological) citizenship in the wake of natural disaster to the use of blood, sweat, and tears (and discarded cigarette butts) to bring awareness to the notion of "risky" bodies. Through analysis of multiple intersections of (In)justice such as criminal, immigrant, and environmental justice, students will investigate representational politics and examine the ways in which social biases influence what and how we see.

Social Autopsy provides a unique glimpse into an arena where activists commingle science and art to advance agendas for justice. This practice of rogue science challenges characterizations of science/scientists as value-neutral and illuminates the ways in which scientific discoveries, interpretations, and applications have both creative and political implications. Through close examination of the art and science of advocacy, students will develop a critical lens through which to see the social world. The course will culminate in an art exhibit and reception featuring students' public information art.

Course Number: IDH 3400-002 or IDH 3400-003
Subtitle: Fertility and the Future
Day & Time: Tuesday/Thursday | 11:00am-12:15pm (002) OR Tuesday/Thursday | 2:00pm (003)
Professor: Holly Singh
Description: This course approaches family-making as a bio-cultural process, addressing claims to the universal and the particular in reproduction. How do gender, class, race, and religion shape reproductive ideals and practices around the world? How do difficulties in reproduction, ranging from infertility and pregnancy loss (miscarriage) to natural disaster and political upheaval, impact those ideals and practices? And how do examinations of fertility from afar through demography, politics, and ethics articulate with intimate, embodied (and dis-embodied) experiences of reproduction, from adoption and abortion to IVF and surrogacy? The course will examine these issues across a variety of geographic contexts and situate local examples within national and global struggles to (re)produce the future.

Course Number: IDH 3400-004
Subtitle: Geographies of Transformation
Day & Time: Tuesday/Thursday | 12:30pm-3:15pm
Professor: Alan Bush
Description: **This is a travel course, spending spring 2018 in Tampa and two weeks in May 2018 in Peru.**
You may have heard the curse: "may you live in interesting times." The ecological transformations of our era indeed make this interesting times. There is another saying that frames this course well, "the future is already here; it just arrives unevenly." The effect of these transformations is quite uneven across geographies. Some, like the high Andean Communities of Peru, are the canary in the coal mine that offers an early warning of the transformations that will affect us all.

The objective of this course twofold. The first is to aid students in developing the capacity to chart these geographies-in-transformation, exploring questions around how ecosystems, patterns of human settlement, livelihoods, and culture are transforming as a result of climate change. The second to aid students in developing the capacity to construct geographies-of-transformation, to understand what it means to live and participate within transforming landscapes, and how to participate in the adaption & development resilient communities. As global citizens, citizens of Florida, and residents of Tampa, and future leaders, it is imperative that we understand how to make sense of geographies-in-transformation, and can provide leadership in constructing geographies-of-transformation.

To accomplish this, the course will do three things. The first is partner with the course "Peoples of the Andes" to do a deep-dive case study into the adaptation by Andean peoples to Climate change. The second will be to do comparative analysis with case studies of other geographies around the world. Third will be to Travel to Peru for a study abroad in May 2018. (To be clear, this is a travel course. You must apply to travel in Peru: Beyond the Classroom and be accepted before receiving a permit for this course.)

Course Number: IDH 3400-005
Subtitle: Travel Course to Germany
Day & Time: Thursday | 12:30pm-3:15pm
Professor: Peter Funke
Description: This class is in preparation of our trip to Germany in May of 2016 and your travels after. The aim is to familiarize you with German history, culture, politics and life. The seminar is structured historically and we work our way from medieval times to present day Germany. As you can see from the readings, we have one main book that covers Germany's historical development as well as several literary works that cover particular periods and themes such as the Holocaust, Germany unification, and Berlin today. You also familiarize yourself with the German language through a weekly language workshop.

Course Number: IDH 3400-006 or IDH 3400-007
Subtitle: Biopsychosocial Components of Behavior and Health
Day & Time: Monday/Wednesday | 11:00am-12:15pm (006) OR Monday/Wednesday | 3:30pm-4:45pm (007)
Professor: Melvin James
Description: Only those on the approved list will be given a permit to register for this course (see Mr. Mejias if you have any questions). This course is only for Sophomores in the 7-yr med program -- permits have already been given. You must be on the approved list in order to take this course! This course provides scientific inquiry, reasoning skills and content areas for the Psychological and Social Foundations of Behavior for the new MCAT 2015. In this course, human behavior and illness are viewed from a systemic rather than a reductionist perspective. The combination of biological, psychological and social determinants, and their contributions to behavior and health, is examined from critical analysis and evidence-based problem solving approaches.

Course Number: IDH 3400-008
Subtitle: Power, Resistance and Social Change
Day & Time: Monday/Wednesday | 2:00pm-3:15pm
Professor: David Jenkins
Description: This course examines revolutionary communication and cultural expression as sites of resistance that contribute to broader systems of social change. Looking at contemporary events like Black Lives Matter and the Arab Spring in comparative perspective with social movements of the past, this course examines how power and resistance operates in society and how revolutionaries express themselves. In varying ways these figures call for new ways of being and construct unique political identities. These "battlegrounds" examined feature multiple narratives that all contend for visibility and control. We will explore relevant debates, historical and contemporary, concerning the political impact of technology as well as the roles of ethnicity, gender, and sexuality in revolutionary politics. There is a focus on social media, humor, art (both "every day" and "fine"), and the human body as sites of resistant communication. The approach to this course is theoretical, practical, local, and transnational. It draws from fields as diverse as sociology, performance studies, rhetoric, critical theory, cultural studies, and postcolonialism.

Course Number: IDH 3400-009
Subtitle: Post-World War II America Through the Camera's Eye
Day & Time: Thursday | 2:00pm-4:45pm
Professor: Daniel Ruth
Description: This course will examine the relationship between the significant news events of Post-World War II American history as covered by television. The course will explore how news events shaped the evolution of television and how television influenced the framing of current events.

Students will study such topics such as the Army-McCarthy Hearings, the emergence of the documentary form of reporting, the Kennedy-Nixon debates, the Kennedy assassination, Vietnam, the Watergate scandal, the Iran hostage crisis, the Clinton impeachment, the Iraq wars, the election of the nation's first black president and the rise of Donald Trump. It is critical that students taking this course enter the classroom with some fundamental prior understanding of the material to be covered. This is not a remedial history class. Rather this course is designed to enhance a student's understanding of historical and current events as well as the medium of television's role in influencing the public's perception of society. Students will also be required to make a weekly presentation assigned by the instructor, as well as prepare an end-of-term project of their own design. Students will also take a 20-question weekly current events quiz.

Course Number: IDH 3400-010
Subtitle: Health, Illness and Society
Day & Time: Tuesday/Thursday | 12:30pm-1:45pm
Professor: Nana Tuntiya
Description: How do people define health or illness? These concepts have much importance to us personally, but they also carry social meaning tied to individuals' status and behavior as well as the attitudes toward them from fellow citizens. Similarly, medicine is more than a science, it is also a social institution that is built on human relationships and fulfills important societal needs. This discussion-based course will explore illness subjectivity, social and cultural determinants of health, doctor-patient interaction, stigmatization of chronic and mental illness, and the development of a new vision of health as an all-encompassing wellness phenomenon. In the end we might find that good health is much more than our own need or interest, it's a profoundly social experience rooted in specific cultural and temporal frameworks.

Course Number: IDH 3400-011
Subtitle: Design Thinking
Day & Time: Thursday | 2:00pm-4:45pm
Professor: Fred Steier and Travis Thompson
Description: What is it like to design a new "app"? An exhibit at a science center? A sustainable community? A global organization that inspires creative confidence? A university? A new home for refugees? A collaborative communication process for designing any of these? This course will develop and explore key ideas of design thinking, including how it relates to design practice. We will focus on design in a very broad sense, as an interdisciplinary approach to problem solving, whether those problems are seen as social, technical, or rooted in the arts and humanities. To situate design thinking as a form of collaborative problem solving, we will grapple with questions of creativity and innovation rooted in contexts of democratic participation and intercultural understanding by inquiring into how problems get defined as problems. In other words, we will study "messes" as a way to look at questions of problem definition, explored across boundaries. As this course is rooted in learning-by-doing, we will study "messes" in both theory and practice!

We will have several projects that will be the basis of our design thinking, with the projects involving potential community partners. These may range from issues involved in lives of refugees to the design of learning spaces (including our own learning spaces) to community building in both a geographical and human sense. In these projects we will focus on issues of design process, communication in design teams, collaboration, and also human values that underlie good design thinking. In other words, the course will involve innovation, creativity, and serious play! For questions or more information on this serious play, please contact Dr. Frederick Steier (fsteier@usf.edu) or Dr. Travis Thompson (tthompson@usf.edu).

Course Number: IDH 3400-012
Subtitle: Using Films to Advance Global Social Policy Knowledge and Practice
Day & Time: Wednesday | 5:00pm-7:45pm
Professor: Lillian Wichinsky
Description: This course will give students an opportunity to expand their worldview of social policy through the medium of film. Students will explore how political, economic, cultural, religious, historical and environmental factors impact social policies and the delivery of human services in different regions of the world. The geographical context for this course will primarily be North America, Africa, Asia and the Middle East and special emphasis will be given to the social issues created by HIV/AIDS, Poverty, Genocide, Immigration, and War. By examining international models of social policy practice, this course will appeal to students who may have an interest in working with culturally diverse populations in the United States and around the globe.

Course Number: IDH 3400-013
Subtitle: Cultures of the World
Day/Time: Tuesday/Thursday | 3:30pm-4:45pm
Professor: Linda Tavernier-Almada
Description: Subtle aspects of national cultural traditions and beliefs guide much of human social behavior. The influence of traditions and beliefs on the decisions of foreign leaders and other decision-makers often escapes our American students, simply because they are not exposed enough to other nations, societies, and cultures outside of the United States. Understanding "Great Traditions," such as Hinduism, and "Lesser Traditions," such as sitting arrangements in post-nomadic societies, is important for university students as they navigate a world that is becoming increasingly pluralistic. This course exposes students to a variety of world cultures, improving their aptitude for international relations.

Course Number: IDH 3400-014
Subtitle: 3D and Interpretive Designs for Museums
Day/Time: Tuesday/Thursday | 3:30pm-4:45pm
Professor: Lori Collins
Description: This course explores the topics relating to how people, information and technology come together at the museum and heritage site level. We will investigate new technologies, how they are being used, how they are changing the nature of museums and site interpretation and how we experience museums and places today and in the future. We will examine aspects of conversation, preservation, ownership, representation, and conflict as they relate to material culture and its interpretation. Using case studies, the instructor will engage students in considering how the past is represented, and how museum personnel, archaeologists, historians, and the public have different perspectives, versions, and understandings of the past. Students in this course will learn hands-on about how to create digital content and models for museum interpretation and design. We will use real world projects and learn about using visualization tools to represent museum collections, improve and enhance visitor experiences, and a range of other museum activities.

Honors Seminar in Applied Ethics – IDH 3600

Course Number: IDH 3600-001
Subtitle: Bio-Medical Ethics
Day & Time: Tuesday/Thursday | 8:00am-9:15am
Professor: John Dormois
Description: You must be pre-approved in order to register for this course. This seminar in applied medical ethics will cover a variety of subjects that will be primarily practical rather than purely philosophical. Topics to be explored include: experimentation on human subjects, access to care, health care disparities, abortion, and the right to die. The primary objective will be to develop a method for approaching ethical issues in medicine. Students will be primarily responsible to leading discussions with minimal formal lecturing.

Course Number: IDH 3600-002
Subtitle: Why What you Do Matters: Ethics at an Individual, Societal and Global Level
Day/Time: Friday | 9:30am-12:15pm
Professor: Maria Sgambati
Description: Each and every day, we are faced with making ethical decisions in our individual lives and collectively as a society. How does it feel to lead an ethical life? How does it feel to lead an unethical life or to make an unethical decision? What do those moment to moment decisions look like? Do you keep something that doesn't belong to you? Do you cheat on a test? Do you lie about something? In a sense, all ethics begins at the individual level. But these individual choices are inextricably linked to and create societal and global ethics. This course is meant to be a broad overview of what ethical values to mean to us as human beings both individually and collectively. We will explore this together through assigned readings, case studies, guest lecturers, and possibly field trips and films on topics such as the death penalty, genetic testing in humans, and religion. Grades will be based on class participation and two five page essays/ papers that will be assigned at the beginning and end of the course.

Course Number: IDH 3600-003
Subtitle: Value in the World: Phenomenology of Practice in Japanese Culture
Day & Time: Tuesday/Thursday | 3:30pm-4:45pm
Professor: Benjamin Young
Description: This course explores the way in which value emerges out of--and is cultivated in terms of--our practical involvement with particular others, within particular environments, and by way of particular historical traditions. In order to bring the relationship between value and practice into focus, we will explore Japanese culture. The philosopher Martin Heidegger's notion of "In-der-Welt-sein," or "being-in-the-world," indicates the particular way in which human beings inhabit meaningful horizons of significance--or "worlds"--that shape who we understand ourselves to be, and how we are practically involved in the world. The way we inhabit worlds, on this account, are through practices. A practice is no mere set of actions aimed at some end, but rather it names a unified world-disclosive form of comportment in which both the being of entities (tables, chairs, houses, etc.) come to be what they are--and we ourselves, as the ones who are involve in the world through practices, become who we are. For example, both baseballs and pitchers become what they are only within the world of baseball.

The phenomenon of world, on this view, is an essential component of what it means to have a self. We become who we are only through our practical and embodied forms of involvement within particular worlds. You are, for example, a student. But you can be so only against the backdrop of the world of academia. Thought in this way, our particular form of being-in-the-world, our mode of comportment, just is what the Greek's called ethos, which is often translated as "character," and is the root of our English word, "ethics." On this view, our way of being-in-the-world, our constellation of practices, is essential to how things, persons, and situations become valuable within particular worlds--and so is essential (and prior) to any form of aesthetic or ethical thinking, evaluation, theory, or application. This course will explore Japanese worlds, in the above sense of the term, both ancient and modern. The aim is to (a) use Hermeneutic Phenomenology to expose and exhibit how ethical and aesthetic ideas are shaped by various practices within Japanese culture, and (b) use these insights to better understand ourselves and our own practical (and ethical) involvements in the constellation of worlds we inhabit. You should anticipate gaining a greater understanding of (1) Japanese culture, (2) the theory of interpretation (hermeneutics), as well as the nature of perception and meaning (phenomenology), (3) the nature of practice and value, and (4) an enriched empathetic and cognitive capacity to appreciate—and value—the diversity of human experience.

Course Number: IDH 3600-004
Subtitle: Environmental Ethics in the Anthropocene
Day & Time: Monday/Wednesday | 3:30pm-4:45pm
Professor: Greg McCreery
Description: The anthropocene, the current geological age in which human activities have significantly altered the environment, presents ethical challenges. A core question is how should humans live in relation to nature? This raises questions concerning population growth, sustainable practices, conservation and preservation, food and water security, pollution, energy production, anthropocentrism and nonanthropocentrism, economics, religion and spirituality, politics, and justice. We will discuss these, and other topics within the discipline of environmental ethics in order to develop your ability to produce normative arguments concerning environmental, and other kinds of ethical issues.

Course Number: IDH 3600-005
Subtitle: Ethics, Complexity and Emergence: Case Studies in Flourishing Systems
Day & Time: Tuesday/Thursday | 11:00am-12:15pm
Professor: Benjamin Young
Description: This course investigates emerging paradigms regarding the relationship between natural systems and subjective experience, as well as the implication for the nature of ethics and our experience of—and relationships with—ourselves, others, and the natural environment. As a first approximation of our path in this course, we begin from the observation that we always find ourselves embedded within a constellation of overlapping systems. These include emotional and perceptional systems, social and political systems (family, friends, professions, cultural styles, etc.), biological and ecological systems, ideological and mythological systems, systems of architecture and design, as well as communication and information systems--to name a few key domains. Our understanding of both the underlying complexity of these systems & our understanding of the ethical relationships that occur within these, is currently undergoing significant change in contemporary research, scholarship, and practice. Taken together, these new ideas compose a radically different way of making sense of, and interacting with, our world. This course will have two phases. First, it will assemble a set of emergent new interdisciplinary ideas, and will help you and fellow students grokk these ideas as a new paradigm.

This paradigm will expose and exhibit how our everyday first-personal experience is wrought and cultivated by constellations of mutually informing systems. We will explore how our embodied involvement within these systems makes us (and others) who we are (how we think, feel, perceive, imagine, and behave), and what we might yet become. Next, from this vantage point, we will explore case studies from our past, present, and future possibilities. The goal will be to envision what this new paradigm offers us by way of cultivating the imaginative, perceptual, and practical skills by which to flourish in the present and future age. You should anticipate (1) a better understanding of yourself as a thoughtful and sensitive embodied being, with others, and within a local and global contexts, and (2) to cultivate a range creative skills for participating in and shaping our human condition. This course will operate as a collaboration between two sections: This 3600 Applied Ethics section will be taught by Dr. Benjamin Young, and our partner course, a 4970 Capstone Course by the same name, will be taught by Dr. Alan Bush. Both sections will meet together at the same time.

Course Number: IDH 3600-006
Subtitle: What the H*ll Do I Do Now?
Day & Time: Monday/Wednesday | 9:30am-10:45am
Professor: William Ditewig
Description: Today's world is a jigsaw puzzle of choices. Sometimes we make good choices; sometimes they're lousy. This seminar will take a wide-ranging look at some of these issues and the ethical principles involved in dealing with them. We will discuss and debate issues of politics, current events, technologies, sexuality, and many more. Students will take an active part in selecting issues for discussion. We will examine issues from many different perspectives. Fundamentally, we will try to formulate an approach to moral decision-making that can be used within any field of study or career.

Course Number: IDH 3600-007
Subtitle: The Ethics of Race: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives
Day & Time: Tuesday/Thursday | 3:30pm-4:45pm
Professor: Greg Mccreery
Description: This course introduces students to the history of race and ethnicity. We will consider diverse definitions of race and ethnicity, the ethics of racial relationships, questions concerning how racial relationships have changed over time, and how race and ethnicity have operated, and perhaps should operate in American politics, arts, and culture.

Course Number: IDH 3600-008
Subtitle: Seminar in Applied Ethics: War
Day/Time: Monday/Wednesday | 11:00am-12:15pm
Professor: Faruk Rahmanovic
Description: Over the past 25 years, United States has become embroiled in an ever-increasing number of militarized peacekeeping actions, conflicts, military strikes, and all-out wars – including the global war on terror. As a result, understanding war, its ethical limits, and implications, has become a requirement for the continuation of an informed democracy. In this course, we examine the role and limits of military force by examining the historical and modern war in the Western, Chinese, and Islamic traditions.

Honors Geographical Perspectives – IDH 4200

Course Number: IDH 4200-001
Subtitle: Zimbabwe: When Good Countries Go Bad
Day & Time: Tuesday/Thursday | 8:00am-9:15am
Professor: Leslie Bessant
Description: Over the course of the last thirty years, Zimbabwe has gone from being called the "breadbasket of southern Africa" to a country of food shortages, hyper-inflation, and skyrocketing unemployment (officially, 90% of adults are unemployed). The country's president, Robert Mugabe, has ruled since 1980, making him one of the longest-serving heads of state in the world. How did Zimbabwe fall so far, so fast? How can Mugabe hold onto power in the face of such massive problems? These are the sorts of questions we will strive to answer in this course. Our readings will include secondary and primary sources, contemporary fiction, film, art, and music. Weekly papers, group projects, final essay; no research papers or exams.

Course Number: IDH 4200 - 002
Subtitle: Russia Between east and West: Empire, Revolution, Ideas and Geopolitics
Day & Time: Monday/Wednesday | 8:00am-9:15am
Professor: Christopher Stroop
Description: When West European diplomats and traders began publishing accounts of their visits to Muscovy in the late sixteenth century, they wrote of a "rude and barbarous kingdom" very different from their home countries. In April 2014, the Russian Ministry of Culture, headed by Vladimir Medinsky, released an official document proclaiming that "Russia is not Europe," but represents, rather, a distinct civilization that is morally superior to the ostensibly "decadent" West. Neither the statements of the early modern Western travel writers nor those of the current Minister of Culture of the Russian Federation should be taken at face value. They can, however, serve to illustrate the perennial contentiousness of the meaning of Russianness — both to outside observers and to Russians themselves, whose self-conscious engagement with the meaning of Russian identity and the role of Russia in the world has expressed itself in art, literature, and scholarship, as well as in the terrorism, violence, and grand messianic visions, both sacred and secular, associated with various revolutionary and utopian projects.

Vladimir Putin's Russia — still the world's largest country, spanning 11 time zones within which numerous peoples speak over 100 distinct languages — cannot be understood without delving into the history of controversial attempts to define Russia's identity and purpose. Including early modern, Russian imperial, Soviet, and post-Soviet material, this course invites us to do just that, along with examining the related issues of empire and geopolitics over the longue durée. In it, along with relevant scholarly literature, we will discuss a variety of primary sources, including examples of Russian literature and philosophy.

Course Number: IDH 4200-003
Subtitle: Sub-Saharan Africa: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives
Day & Time: Tuesday/Thursday | 9:30am-10:45am
Professor: Fenda Akiwumi
Description: This course will look at culture, societies and development in Sub-Saharan Africa in historical and contemporary context. It will be a broad interdisciplinary introduction to the study of this part of the African continent. Africa's history, politics, cultures, and societies are rich, diverse, and complex yet generalizations and negative stereotypes about Africa by the media, academics, and policy-makers are common (apocalyptic scenarios of civil war, poverty, famine, diseases such as AIDS and failed states, for example). Using selected case studies we will explore political, economic, and socio-cultural characteristics of both modern and traditional Africa and through critical evaluation of course materials obtain a more balanced portrayal of the continent and its development.

Course Number: IDH 4200-004
Subtitle: Global and Multicultural Perspectives
Day & Time: Monday/Wednesday | 11:00am-12:15pm
Professor: Barbara Cruz
Description: Shift happens! As the United States and the world continues to change in unprecedented ways, how do these changes and shifts impact our daily lives? This course will examine the major issues, practices, and controversies surrounding global and multicultural perspectives in our society. Students will become conversant in these topics and consider global and multicultural perspectives in their lives, fields of study, and future professions. Special attention will be given to the U.S. and Latin America and the Caribbean.

Course Number: IDH 4200-005
Subtitle: Cities of the Global South
Day & Time: Tuesday/Thursday | 9:30am-10:45am
Professor: Alan Bush
Description: A majority of humans who have ever lived are alive today. The majority of those alive today live in cities, most of whom live in cities of the Global South. What does that mean? The dominant experience of being human is that of life in these new, complex & rapidly transforming cities. Drawing on art, storytelling, & scholarly research, this course will explore the cultural, social, political, economic and physical landscape of cities like Jakarta, Cape Town, Delhi, Lagos, Mexico City & Saõ Paolo as a diverse but cohesive geography.

Course Number: IDH 4200-006
Subtitle: Contemporary Middle East: Political Challenges in a Global Age
Day & Time: Tuesday/Thursday | 12:30pm-1:45pm
Professor: Nazek Jawad
Description: Recently, the Middle East is conceived as a region that breeds fundamentalism and an area of long lasting conflicts. Due to the distorted notions and misrepresentations of the Middle East circulated and promoted in corporate media, and in conventional media outlets as well, this course is set into a great mission. This course aims to provide students with an authentic understanding of the diversified multi-layered facets of the Middle East, and to expose them to the breadth of Middle Eastern cultures, and their political and cultural landmarks within historical and contemporary contexts. This course discusses the main social, economic, and political developments in the Middle East from the 19th century onward. Topics to be covered include, but are not limited to: colonial legacies; Islamic Sharia Laws, identity politics, social movements, Arab uprisings, women and politics in the Middle East, terrorism, and development. Besides, this course also highlights the Middle East abundant culture, and introduces students to countless contributions of Middle East countries to human civilizations in wide range of areas, including science, arts, architecture, and music.
The aim of this course is to broaden students' intellectual perspective by introducing them to the geography, history, politics, political economy, culture, and arts of the Middle East. Another equally important goal of this course is to impart appreciation of cultures other than their own, by introducing them to the diversified cultures of the Middle East.

Course Number: IDH 4200-008
Subtitle: Ukraine: Social and Cultural Landscapes
Day & Time: Tuesday/Thursday | 2:00pm-3:15pm
Professor: Nana Tuntiya
Description: Thrown into the middle of geopolitical controversy surrounding Crimea and its rebellious East, Ukraine remains largely unknown to its Western supporters. The country's rich and complex history, its evolving relationship with a powerful neighboring nation, Russia, shaped the cultural backdrop against which the recent events are unfolding. This course will look into significant experiences that helped form public attitudes, traditions, and social practices throughout the Ukrainian turbulent past. It will also explore the population make up of this largest country in Europe by land mass, and its struggle to overcome the remnants of the soviet regime. The focus of the class is on society and its culture rather than politics, with the aim of understanding the attitudes and the aspirations that are building a way for the future of this Eastern European nation.

Course Number: IDH 4200-009
Subtitle: Australia
Day & Time: Friday | 9:30am-12:15pm
Professor: Tony Erben
Description: What does it mean for persons living inside the settler nation of Australia to call themselves Australian? What are the historical and cultural roots of Australianness and why does this matter in a globalised world? These questions form the main basis of a unit that considers Australia through a variety of disciplinary lenses, including anthropology, history, cultural studies and sociology. Using key cultural practices such as art, sport, national celebrations, music, film and tourism as focal points, the unit aims to facilitate understanding of the foundational myths of Australia. Australia is far enough away from the rest of the world to hold a certain level of mystery for the uninitiated. The distances, the animals, the geography and history of the largest island continent have over the past 200 years framed its people and guided the development of an innovative creative and oftentimes brash people. While Australia, the country, is relatively young, the continent is ancient. This course will introduce students to all aspects of Australian life, culture, flora and fauna. More importantly, this course will raise student' awareness and appreciation through the perceptive and amusing tales of an American tourist who has re-visited Australia numerous times over the past decade and has learned something new with each visit. His tales shall be the starting point for our collective discovery of this fascinating continent called Australia. The text that will be used is Bill Bryson's "In a Sunburned Country". The professor for the course is Australian....so expect this course to be brash, uplifting and creative!

Course Number: IDH 4200-010
Subtitle: Histories of Healing in South Asia
Day & Time: Monday/Wednesday | 2:00pm-3:15pm
Professor: Holly Singh
Description: This course focuses on the long and varied historical trajectories of healing in South Asia, from the ancient development and practice of systems such as Ayurveda, Unani, Yoga, and folk systems to manage illness and promote health to the introduction and proliferation of biomedicine. Through the examination of how laypeople have engaged these systems and how governments have patronized, promoted, and politicized healing practice and health promotion during centuries of shifting rule, the course will explore culture, health, and healing. It will address how local and global power relations influence the dynamics of healing over time and across diverse regions of South Asia. The course builds toward, for example, critical analysis of medical tourism to South Asia, the globalization of yoga, and public health crises in contemporary South Asia.

Course Number: IDH 4200-011
Subtitle: Cultural Constructions of Disability (Service-Learning)
Day & Time: Tuesday/Thursday | 11:00am-12:15pm
Professor: Lindy Davidson
Description: In this course, we will explore the ways culture impacts the understanding of disability, the experiences of individuals with disabilities, and the material existence of disabled bodies in an able-bodied world. We will take a culture-centered approach to our explorations of disability around the world by seeking out expressions of disability produced by each cultural group we study in regions including Latin America, South Asia, Africa and others. The course is designed to be interactive with multiple exploratory activities and response papers as well as a final research project. Some students will have the opportunity to participate in the Global Health Catalyst Conference in the spring.

Course Number: IDH 4200-012
Subtitle: Birthplace of Aphrodite and Strategic Key to the Middle East
Day & Time: Monday/Wednesday | 11:00am-12:15pm
Professor: William Ditewig
Description: This course is intended to acquaint students with the cultural and strategic importance of this beautiful island country in the Easter Mediterranean Sea. The course investigates the complex history of the island of the gods, through the shipwrecks of St. Paul, the naval intrigues of the Venetians (including the tragedy of Shakespeare's Othello) the crusading adventures of Richard the Lionheart of England, and the importance of Cyprus in contemporary strategic matters in Middle Eastern politics. This course will have something for everyone!

Course Number: IDH 4200-016
Subtitle: Music and Culture of South Asia
Day & Time: Tuesday/Thursday | 12:30pm-1:45pm
Professor: Anshu Tamang
Description: This class will cover the musics and cultures of South Asia. We will begin with India and move on to Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Afghanistan, and Sri Lanka. Acknowledging that each nation-state showcases a variety of music genres and musical practices, this course will highlight more than one genre of music – classical, folk, religious, and/or popular – from each country. The course will introduce basic concepts of listening to musics from South Asia and highlight the role of music as a discourse to mark and legitimize notions of political, regional, religious, and national belonging. In addition, readings will focus on theoretical discussions and critical analysis to garner a deeper understanding of how music production constitutes the social, cultural, and historical realities of South Asia. No prior knowledge of music or musical terms is required for this course.

Course Number: IDH 4200 - 017
Subtitle: Russia Between East and West: Empire, Revolution, Ideas and Geopolitics
Day & Time: Monday/Wednesday | 3:30pm-4:45pm
Professor: Christopher Stroop
Description: When West European diplomats and traders began publishing accounts of their visits to Muscovy in the late sixteenth century, they wrote of a "rude and barbarous kingdom" very different from their home countries. In April 2014, the Russian Ministry of Culture, headed by Vladimir Medinsky, released an official document proclaiming that "Russia is not Europe," but represents, rather, a distinct civilization that is morally superior to the ostensibly "decadent" West. Neither the statements of the early modern Western travel writers nor those of the current Minister of Culture of the Russian Federation should be taken at face value. They can, however, serve to illustrate the perennial contentiousness of the meaning of Russianness — both to outside observers and to Russians themselves, whose self-conscious engagement with the meaning of Russian identity and the role of Russia in the world has expressed itself in art, literature, and scholarship, as well as in the terrorism, violence, and grand messianic visions, both sacred and secular, associated with various revolutionary and utopian projects.

Vladimir Putin's Russia — still the world's largest country, spanning 11 time zones within which numerous peoples speak over 100 distinct languages — cannot be understood without delving into the history of controversial attempts to define Russia's identity and purpose. Including early modern, Russian imperial, Soviet, and post-Soviet material, this course invites us to do just that, along with examining the related issues of empire and geopolitics over the longue durée. In it, along with relevant scholarly literature, we will discuss a variety of primary sources, including examples of Russian literature and philosophy.

Course Number: IDH 4200-018
Subtitle: Global Perspectives in Health: The Dominican Republic (Service-Learning)
Day & Time: Tuesday/Thursday | 9:30am-10:45am
Professor: Lindy Davidson
Description: In this geo-perspectives course, students will explore the many factors contributing to health in the Dominican Republic. Throughout the semester, we will consider political, economic, environmental, structural, and cultural perspectives that impact health in the Dominican Republic. At the end of the semester, students will participate in the Honors Service Trip to the Dominican Republic, where we will work with the Kerolle Initiative for Community Health. On the trip, students will serve in mobile medical clinics, stay in homes with community members, and participate in service projects to improve the overall health of the communities in and around Sosúa. In order to receive a permit for this course, please fill out the application through Education Abroad.

Course Number: IDH 4200-019
Subtitle: Japan
Day & Time: Tuesday/Thursday | 3:30pm-4:45pm
Professor: Atsuko Sakai
Description: Japan is like a "period" at the end of a sentence. Whether it is religion, culture or technology, Japan was often the final destination for any movements flowing East. Traveling through other countries and eventually crossing the ocean, these movements morphed overtime reflecting the geological and geographical context of places passed through. It reminds you of the children's game "whisper down the valley." Our geographic studies include the overall history, current socio-economical issues, nature and environment, the cultural identity through language, arts and architecture, and oral history of WWII.
This course provides an opportunity for a trip to Japan in May (optional) in order to observe the concepts learned in class, interact with locals and participate in cultural activities. The main themes for this year of both course and trip are:

1) Hands-on Learning: Creative Learning through Design Education in Sendai;
2) Monozukuri: Philosophy, Engineering, and Technology of Product Making in Nagoya;
3) Well-being: Health, Welfare, and Living in Japan in Gifu;
4) Culture: Artisanship and Craftsmanship in Kyoto/Nara; and
5) Complexity: Tokyo - Systems of a Complex City.

We will also have an opportunity to collaborate with Dr. Young with his course, "Applied Ethics, Value-in-the-World: Phenomenology of Practice in Japanese Culture" to encourage various interdisciplinary conversations throughout the semester and while in Japan.
"Permit" required for students who would like to go for a Japan trip, please contact professor Sakai for more information. Once students with travel option are registered, any available seats will be open to students without travel.

Course Number: IDH 4200-020
Subtitle: Trip to Peru -- Peru: People of the Andes
Day & Time: Tuesday | 12:30pm-3:15pm
Professor: Ella Schmidt
Description: The Columbian "discovery" of the 'New World' forced the interaction of realities and cultural systems that were profoundly different, even unintelligible. Since the early years of the Spanish conquest, the "Indian problem" has haunted democratic leaders, dictators, policy makers, and, especially, the indigenous populations themselves. National discourses (sometimes racist or classist, other times a combination of the two) have been constructed in an effort to solve this "Indian problem" to the detriment of indigenous people.

However, after over 500 years of conquest, indigenous people in Latin America have stubbornly managed to creatively maintain their communal way of life and preserve much of their ancestral land. Using the Andean people of Peru as a case study, this course will introduce students to the history, cosmovision, and cultural beliefs that continue to shape their lives and interactions with power, racism, and marginalization. (Note: This is a travel course. You must apply to travel and be accepted before receiving a permit for this course.)

Course Number: IDH 4200-021
Subtitle: Buenos Aires in Literature, Music and Film
Day & Time: Wednesday | 2:00pm-4:45pm
Professor: Adriana Novoa
Description: In this class, we will study the development of popular culture in Buenos Aires, Argentina, from the 1850s to the first decade of this century. We will analyze the main events that defined the formation of the country's cultural identity and how they shaped the present political debates. Some of the topics that will be covered are the emergence of the literature about the "guacho," the expansion of soccer and tango, the role of mass media in shaping Peronism, the counterculture movement of the sixties and the emergence of "rock nacional" as a youth movement. We will sue literature, music, film and arts to cover the different popular forms that definte the role of Buenos Aires in Argentina's culture and politics. (NOTE: This is a travel course, so a permit is required. Only students whose travel application has been accepted can enroll in the course.)

HONORS SPECIAL TOPICS - IDH 4930

Section Number: IDH 4930-001
Subtitle: Seminar in Medicine
Day & Time: Friday | 1:00pm-3:45pm
Professor: Steven Specter
Description: Students will experience various aspects of the medical school pre-clinical curriculum and discuss aspects of professional attitudes and values development. The course will be taught by a number of faculty members speaking in an area of expertise.

Objectives:
1. To develop an understanding of the diversity of medical education that strives to teach knowledge, skills and values/attitudes of the medical professional.
2. To begin to work as a team in working through a medical problem to develop clinical reasoning skills
3. To get a sense of what the medical school curriculum will be like and be exposed to topics often covered in an extracurricular setting.

IDH 4950

Course Number: IDH 4950-002
Subtitle: Get Innovative: The Habits of Mind that Foster Creativity
Day & Time: Monday/Wednesday | 2:00pm-3:15pm
Professor: Sarah Kiefer
Description: What is innovative thinking? We often assume that innovative thinking is the result of one person's irrepressible creative genius bursting forth to change the ways we think, act, or create. Innovative thinking is often thought of as an inborn and unchangeable trait. However, research indicates there are habits of mind associated with innovation and creativity, habits that everyone can work to develop and refine. This course provides you an exceptional opportunity to investigate innovative and creative thinking from the inside out and discover for yourself what these habits are and how to use them effectively. By examining and analyzing the processes of a series of illustrious guest lecturers – each a recognized innovator – and selected case studies, you will discover the habits and processes that lie at the heart of innovation and creativity.

Course Number: IDH 4950-003
Subtitle: Digital Video
Day & Time: Monday/Wednesday | 2:00pm-3:15pm
Professor: James Hatten
Description: In this course students will learn to effectively shoot, edit, and publish digital video projects for use in journalism, education, business, marketing, healthcare, advertising, broadcast, hobby, and the Internet. The course covers the basics of capturing video, camera movement techniques, editing techniques, producing, directing, writing for video, interviewing, lighting techniques, audio editing and capture, and the publishing of projects. Additionally, students learn to analyze various techniques and effects on viewers. Through these video productions and through lectures and examples, students develop their own digital literacy. The majority of grading in the course is derived from seven video projects spanning various genres. The final video project for this course satisfies the USF Honors College capstone presentation requirement.

Course Number: IDH 4950-004
Subtitle: Quality Makes ¢ent$: Healthcare Research & Quality Outcomes Healthcare Research and Quality Outcomes

Day/Time: Tuesday | 5:30pm-8:15pm
Professor: Donna Lee Ettel
Description: Description: What ethical and legal obligations do hospitals have to patients? What challenges and issues arise while conducting healthcare quality projects? How are quality of care and cost of delivery related? Using literature (Foucault's The Birth of the Clinic, Gawande's Better: A Surgeon's Notes on Performance, and others) and film (The English Surgeon, Malice, and others), this course purposes to instill the knowledge of community needs through cultural enlightenment, interdisciplinary practices, and real-life experience. This course will primarily focus on clinical outcomes, process change, and emphasizes analysis of the patient care process to identify specific interventions. Students will learn to incorporate the research process as they conduct an actual healthcare outcomes study utilizing a quantitative research approach. Students will present findings and practical applications to BayCare administrators. Designed for students interested in interprofessional healthcare delivery, this course seeks to assist students with developing competencies expected of professional programs. Additional topics include an overview of accreditation standards; licensure agencies; reimbursement systems; legal/ethical issues; healthcare computerization; documentation, quality, compliance, and regulatory requirements and HIPPA compliance.

**Please note that this class will occasionally meet at a BayCare campus in Tampa during a determined time that works for everyone– please allow time for traveling back and forth when you are planning your schedule. Transportation is not provided.**

IDH 4970

Course Number: IDH 4970-002
Subtitle: How to Make History
Day & Time: Friday | 9:30am-12:15pm
Professor: Catherine Wilkins
Description: In 1963, Martin Luther King, Jr. wrote that "We are made by history," emphasizing the importance of historical events and narratives in constructing our understanding of the world and ourselves. Many of us might think of History – the academic discipline - as little more than a sequence of objective facts, a chronological list of important names, dates, and battles. In reality history – as a lived experience – is much more personal and intimate. It is experienced every day, by every individual. Events from the mundane to momentous are experienced and remembered by people, recorded by some, and passed along to future generations, hopefully for their edification. This course will focus on how history might shape our identity as residents of the Tampa Bay area, with an emphasis on the process by which history is made, and the role that we might play – as students, researchers, and practitioners – in making history ourselves.

In partnership with the St. Pete Beach Public Library, the Gulf Beaches Historical Museum, and the Pinellas Memory project, this Honors Capstone course will provide students with hands-on experience in: recording oral histories, producing documentary photography, digitizing visual and print artifacts, cataloguing and creating a historical archive, and developing an exhibition/program of their work. Our goal will be to digitize and add to the collection of the Gulf Beaches Historical Museum, and to contribute our work to the Pinellas Memory online archive of historical artifacts. This is a designated service learning course and is perfect for students interested in Communication, History, Library and Information Science, Art, Florida Studies, Humanities, and Digital Media. Please note: This course will regularly meet off-campus: near-weekly travel to the beautiful beaches of Pinellas County is required. Students must provide their own transportation and ensure that they leave enough time in their schedule for travel.

Course Number: IDH 4970-003
Subtitle: Connections: Mental Healthcare, Community Engagement and Art
Day & Time: Monday | 3:00pm-5:45pm
Professor: Catherine Wilkins
Description: In this collaboration between the USF Honors College and the Tampa Museum of Art, Honors students learn about medical conditions such as dementia, depression, and PTSD and are trained to facilitate interactions with works of art for patient groups dealing with these diagnoses. The program is based on the Meet Me at MOMA Alzheimer's Project, which strove to make art accessible to people with dementia, and has been highly successful and lauded by healthcare professionals, museum staff, and participants alike. This class will train students in the Visual Thinking Strategies method of art exploration, which allows participants to give their own personal interpretations of works of art without fear of judgment or failure. Particularly in people with Alzheimer's, depression, and PTSD, this method has been found to help patients access and express memories, practice or regain their communication skills, externalize emotions, relieve stress and anxiety, and promote positive emotions.

This capstone course will allow students to participate in furthering the research in these areas by providing an immersive experience at the intersection of art, medicine, and mental health. This class will also instruct students in the practices of observation, deep listening, and critical thinking, build empathy and understanding, and engage students with the community. Perfect for students interested in Art, Biomedical Sciences, Psychology, Public Health – or who just want to be more involved in their community. Please note that this class meets at the Tampa Museum of Art – please allow time for traveling back and forth when you are planning your schedule. Transportation is not provided.

Course Number: IDH 4970-004
Subtitle: Ethics, Complexity and Emergence: Case Studies in Flourishing Systems
Day & Time: Tuesday/Thursday | 11:00am-12:15pm
Professor: Alan Bush
Description: This course investigates emerging paradigms regarding the relationship between natural systems and subjective experience, as well as the implication for the nature of ethics and our experience of—and relationships with—ourselves, others, and the natural environment. As a first approximation of our path in this course, we begin from the observation that we always find ourselves embedded within a constellation of overlapping systems. These include emotional and perceptional systems, social and political systems (family, friends, professions, cultural styles, etc.), biological and ecological systems, ideological and mythological systems, systems of architecture and design, as well as communication and information systems--to name a few key domains. Our understanding of both the underlying complexity of these systems & our understanding of the ethical relationships that occur within these, is currently undergoing significant change in contemporary research, scholarship, and practice. Taken together, these new ideas compose a radically different way of making sense of, and interacting with, our world. This course will have two phases. First, it will assemble a set of emergent new interdisciplinary ideas, and will help you and fellow students grokk these ideas as a new paradigm.

This paradigm will expose and exhibit how our everyday first-personal experience is wrought and cultivated by constellations of mutually informing systems. We will explore how our embodied involvement within these systems makes us (and others) who we are (how we think, feel, perceive, imagine, and behave), and what we might yet become. Next, from this vantage point, we will explore case studies from our past, present, and future possibilities. The goal will be to envision what this new paradigm offers us by way of cultivating the imaginative, perceptual, and practical skills by which to flourish in the present and future age. You should anticipate (1) a better understanding of yourself as a thoughtful and sensitive embodied being, with others, and within a local and global contexts, and (2) to cultivate a range creative skills for participating in and shaping our human condition. This course will operate as a collaboration between two sections: This 4970 Capstone Course, will be taught by Dr. Alan Bush. Our partner course, a 3600 Applied Ethics section by the same name, will be taught by Dr. Benjamin Young. Both sections will meet together at the same time.

Honors Selected Topics (Not an Honors College Core Course) -- IDH 2930

Course Number: IDH 2930-008
Subtitle: Make: Hands-On Engineering Design
Day & Time: Monday | 5:00pm-7:45pm
Professor: Rudy Schlaf
Description: Inspired by the "maker movement," the objective of the make course is to introduce students to the creative design and manufacturing of devices following the engineering design process. The course will teach students the essentials needed for design of mechatronic devices. Students will learn to use 3D design software, programming of mirco controllers, and to build electronic control unites. All students will design and build a prototype device during the course. All majors and backgrounds welcome.

Course Number: IDH 2930-009
Subtitle: Backstage Pass to Health Professions
Day & Time: Monday | 4:00pm-4:50pm
Professor: Donna Petersen Alexander
Description: If you are interested in learning more about interprofessional health teams, please join Dr. Donna Petersen, Dean of the USF School of Public Health in this 1 credit Special Topics course on this Spring semester. As a student in this course, you will rotate among interprofessional teams that consist of a variety of health professionals. Class time will be devoted to discussions about these experiences and assignments.