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Publications & Presentations

Publications

Below you will find a list of publications authored by Global Citizens Project staff or featuring the Global Citizens Project.


student projects (e.g., dissertations, thesis)

Below you will find a list of dissertations/theses featuring The Global Citizens Project. 

Ozkul, P. (2019). Assessing study abroad relationship with perceived global competence levels of undergraduate business students. Available from ProQuest Dissertations & Theses A&I. (2246444845).

Abstract

Educating for global competence is vital if college graduates are to thrive in today's technology driven and globally competitive world. One strategy for introducing students to unknown cultures and gaining important life skills is participation in a study abroad experience.

The purpose of this exploratory quasi-experimental research design study was to assess the relationship between perceived global competence levels and participation in study abroad experiences of business undergraduate students. The study assessed three dimensions of personal development: cognitive, intrapersonal, and interpersonal in a multicultural environment using a total of six global competence scales. Data were gathered from business undergraduate students using the validated Global Perspective Inventory (GPI) instrument before and after their study abroad. The control group included students who did not study abroad, and the treatment group was comprised of students who did.


Flores, K. (2019). The impact of the Global Citizens Project (Unpublished honor's thesis). University of South Florida, Tampa, FL.

Abstract

This thesis explored the impact of the Global Citizens Project by asking, "How does the Global Citizens Project impact students' lives and career paths? Which high impact activities do students feel contributed the most to this impact?" This study revealed students reporting on the impact of GCP on-campus global events, and specifically the UN Sustainable Development Goals Lecture Series as the catalyst for increased global interest. In addition, they reported on community service and globally-focused course work as impactful as it enabled them to join with others in making a difference in others' lives. 


Greene, B. (2019). How undergraduate students experience global coursework and internship (Unpublished honor's thesis). University of South Florida, Tampa, FL.

Abstract

The Global Citizens Project at the University of South Florida is a global initiative with the
mission to develop students’ affective and cognitive abilities essential to being a global citizen who engages meaningfully with diverse people, places, events, and challenges and provides resources and opportunities for scholarships and study abroad trips. Participants are required to engage in two out of six options for Globally-Focused Activities and write reflections answering a series of questions about how their experiences enhanced the GCP Student Learning Outcomes and contributed to the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals. As an Undergraduate Research Assistant for GCP, I conducted a retrospective discourse analysis using qualitative methods to assess how students relate to the GCP SLOs and UN SDGs through their Coursework and Internship Reflections. I formulated and applied a coding system to determine how students articulated connections to the program’s principles. Observable patterns in the data sets indicated students perceived the question(s) with different meanings and lacked awareness of the ancillary themes UN SDG Targets and GCP SLO Behavioral Indicators. This suggests curriculum development may be prudent for the program to accurately assess how students regard their global experiences in future research. Global initiatives such as the GCP and the UN judiciously engage in ongoing program evaluation and improvement in the quest to produce contributing members of society that can together actualize the United Nations’ mission to “achieve a better and more sustainable future for all.”

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Miller, R. (2018). Global discovery in college: How do students view global citizenship (an unpublished qualitative research paper). University of South Florida, Tampa, FL.

Abstract

The Global Citizen’s Project (GCP) program allows the university to connect with students by furthering their knowledge of what it means to be a global citizen in order to develop an engagement with diverse people, places, events, challenges, and opportunities. After over three years of implementation of GCP, there is a need to measure progress, specifically, how students view global experiences on the basis of self-reflection through prompted contemplative questions. This exploratory research is done by measuring how reflections relating to community service and study abroad align with Schattle’s (2008) view for what defines well-rounded global citizens. The hypothesis was that students’ selected GCP outcomes were consistent with outcomes explicitly identified in their narrative responses. Data was gathered in a single-coder system. Additional themes (interpretive outcomes) were tracked in each student’s responses on the basis of qualitative case study of two GCP experiences. The result of this study was that when comparing the two globally focused experiences, willingness was the students’ most frequently identified outcome in reference to community service, however, when examining the study abroad reflections, self-awareness was the students’ most commonly identified outcome. However, in both categories, the most common theme evident in the student responses based upon the coding system was awareness. The implications of this research are that students are able to see themselves as responsible and participatory in global societies (two of the three primary concepts of Shattle’s argument), but are less inclined to view their global experiences as something that makes them more aware. Further research should focus on the reflective process for students participating in the Global Citizen Award specifically, and global initiatives more broadly.

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Baerga, T. (2019). How do students at the University of South Florida describe their study abroad experience? Poster session presented at the USF's Office of Undergraduate Research Conference, Tampa, FL.

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Presentations

Below you will find a list of presentations given by Global Citizens Project staff at state, regional, national, and international conferences.

Lister, J.J., Yee, K., Fulton, K., McCollaum, B., & Mitchell, S. (2018). Defining and measuring global competence:  Lessons learned midway through USF’s Global Citizens Project. International Perspectives on University Teaching and Learning, Orlando, FL.

Abstract

The University of South Florida (USF) Global Citizens Project (GCP) is a university-wide initiative designed to improve the overall global competence of USF undergraduate students through a four-tiered approach: globalization of the USF general education curriculum, global certification of in-major courses, global certification of entire major programs, and co-curricular offerings such as study abroad, service learning, and other activities and events. Students who successfully complete multiple components of the GCP earn the Global Citizens Award, and this is indicated on their final transcript. The GCP was envisioned in 2015 as USF’s Quality Enhancement Project, a requirement for re-affirmation by SACSCOC. In the first two years of the project, a number of lessons have been learned and adjustments have been made. Revisions of the USF program of general education motivated changes to the interface between GCP and general education. In response to low student completion rates for the Global Citizens Award, changes were made to motivate, recruit, and retain students. When targets were not met for in-major courses, particularly in STEM areas, faculty learning communities were created for specific majors. As assessment has been an ongoing challenge and existing commercial assessments fell short of expectations, the USF GCP embarked upon the development and validation of the USF Global Competency Test, which is currently being piloted. Issues, adjustments, and data will be presented as we describe the first two years of the USF GCP, with emphasis on lessons transferrable to other institutions.

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Fulton, K., & Mitchell, S. (2018). Global learning across the disciplines. Association of American Colleges & Universities (AAC&U): Global Learning in College Conference, Seattle, WA.

Abstract

Different disciplines define global learning in a variety of ways, which ultimately affects how faculty prepare students for careers in their field. A shared vision for global learning can assist in aligning curricular opportunities with university-level goals. Additionally, a shared vision can show how each discipline contributes to developing students’ ability to engage meaningfully with global issues and challenges while equipping students with the skills needed for the global workforce. Drawing from expertise establishing and facilitating interdisciplinary learning communities for faculty to globally enhance their courses, the facilitators of this session will discuss how distinct departments (representing STEM fields, social sciences, the arts, and others) have used course syllabi, assignments, and activities to address and contribute to shared global learning outcomes. Small-group activities will lead participants through the process of analyzing the strengths and weaknesses of a university-level shared vision of global learning.

Association of American Colleges & Universities (AAC&U): Global Learning in College Conference

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Mitchell, S. & Fulton, K. (2017). Supporting faculty, staff, and students through global engagement programming. Association of American Colleges & Universities (AAC&U): Global Learning in College Conference, New Orleans, LA.

Abstract

Faculty and staff play essential roles in motivating students to engage meaningfully with global issues and challenges. It is therefore important to support faculty and staff by providing opportunities for global development as well as collaborate in their efforts to expand student global engagement. Drawing from expertise establishing and leading global engagement programming for faculty, student affairs educators, staff, and students, the facilitators of this session will address ways to engage and support various audiences across college campuses. Small-group activities will lead participants through the process of developing low-cost, high-impact global programming aimed at engaging a variety of campus audiences. Ways to adapt these strategies to different institutional contexts will also be considered. Participants will discuss ways of engaging and collaborating with various campus audiences in the development and implementation of global programming initiatives.

Association of American Colleges & Universities (AAC&U): Global Learning in College Conference

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West, N.M., Heath, M, and Davis-Salazar, K.L. (2017). Leveraging lessons learned: A model for creating collaborative, integrated global learning programs on campus. NASPA Annual Conference, San Antonio, TX.

Abstract

As the world becomes increasingly interconnected, postsecondary institutions are called upon to implement global learning programs that help students develop global competencies. The University of South Florida's Global Citizens Project is leveraging existing campus resources to create a collaborative community of faculty and student affairs professionals who work closely together to create synergistic global learning opportunities. This presentation will explore a conceptual framework for creating global learning programs at other institutions regardless of unique missions, values, and resources.

NASPA

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West, N.M. & Davis-Salazar, K.L. (2016). Examining the experiences of underserved students participating in USF’s Global Citizens Project. Association of American Colleges & Universities (AAC&U): Global Learning in College Conference, Denver, CO.

Abstract

Student participation in high-impact practices has consistently been linked with positive student success outcomes. Unfortunately, researchers have found that underserved students participate in these types of curricular and co-curricular experiences less than other students. This is especially troubling since gains from participating in high-impact practices are even greater for students from underrepresented backgrounds. Participants will explore preliminary data related to characteristics and experiences of underserved students participating in a global learning program at the University of South Florida and will be asked to consider how the findings might inform strategies designed to recruit (and retain) underserved students into high-impact practices.

Association of American Colleges & Universities (AAC&U): Global Learning in College Conference


West, N.M. & Davis-Salazar, K.L. (2016). Innovative and high-impact practices: Evidence-based teaching practice for global learning. Association of American Colleges & Universities (AAC&U): Global Learning in College Conference, Denver CO.

Abstract

This discussion will examine ways in which high-impact practices and ethical global learning experiences are being developed, implemented, and assessed to advance global learning in the classroom, on campus, and beyond.

Association of American Colleges & Universities (AAC&U): Global Learning in College Conference

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West, N.M. & Davis-Salazar, K.L. (2016). Engaging faculty in global learning: Strategies for curriculum design and development. Association of American Colleges & Universities (AAC&U): Global Learning in College Conference, Denver CO.

Abstract

As creators and curators of the college curriculum, faculty play a central role in advancing global learning on campus, and importantly, in "nurturing student efficacy in a global world." It is therefore imperative to engage faculty members early and often in the development and implementation of global learning initiatives. Drawing from our experience working with faculty to develop USF's Quality Enhancement Plan, the Global Citizens Project, and more recently, creating and leading global faculty development opportunities, the facilitators of this session will address ways to engage and support faculty in curriculum design and development to achieve global learning goals. Three small-group activities will lead participants through the process of developing a shared set of global learning outcomes, incorporating the shared learning outcomes into individual courses, and aligning degree programs with global learning goals and outcomes. Ways to adapt these strategies to different institutional contexts are also considered. Participants will learn methods for engaging and working with faculty in the development of global student learning outcomes, the global re/design of courses, and the global alignment of curricular programs.

Association of American Colleges & Universities (AAC&U): Global Learning in College Conference

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Davis-Salazar, K.L., Heath, M., Lauther, J., & Morgan, K. (2016). Global Citizens Project: Promoting global competencies in undergraduate students. First Year Experience Conference, Orlando, FL.

Abstract

USF's Global Citizens Project (GCP) is a University-wide initiative aimed at enhancing undergraduate students' global competencies through the development of new and improved curricular and co-curricular experiences. The GCP has three goals: (a) provide undergraduates with an introduction to global competencies through the FKL Core Curriculum (Global FKL), (b) provide undergraduates with opportunities to practice and apply global competencies through their degree programs (Global Pathways), and (c) provide undergraduates with opportunities to reinforce global competencies through an award program (Global Citizen Awards). This session will focus on USF's experiences building and branding the Global Citizen Awards.

First Year Experience Conference

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Davis-Salazar, K.L. & West, N.M. (2016). Global citizenship as a high quality and equity-focused framework for general education. Association of American Colleges & Universities (AAC&U): General Education and Assessment Conference, New Orleans, LA. 

Abstract

Our increasingly diverse university communities call for innovative models and approaches to learning and development, particularly within general education, which serves all students. However, for many institutions, general education consists of a varied array of courses, the connections among which are often not apparent or even non-existent. How do we bring coherence and intentionality to general education in order to create effective and meaningful educational experiences for all students? In this interactive, sequenced session, participants will learn how the University of South Florida is using global citizenship as a high quality and equity-focused framework for redesigning general education to meet the needs of its diverse student body. Exploration of the conceptual framework, strategies for curricular change, and methods for institutional adaption will be highlighted.

Association of American Colleges & Universities (AAC&U): General Education and Assessment Conference


Davis-Salazar, K.L. (2015). 'Glocalizing' your campus: From aspiration to inspiration. Association of American Colleges & Universities (AAC&U): Global Learning in College Conference, Ft. Lauderdale, FL.

Abstract

How does a college or university community come together to successfully advance institutional global learning aspirations? Dr. Davis-Salazar will provide a big picture view of the process for infusing global learning into the undergraduate experience as well as practical steps for defining a shared set of learning outcomes, developing collective strategies that cross disconnected units, and integrating the curriculum and co-curriculum for meaningful and sustained impact. She will highlight the importance of understanding institutional contexts and working within existing structures and systems, while simultaneously forging new pathways that connect sites of global learning across and beyond campus. Having recently transitioned from an AAC&U-supported pilot project on global citizenship to a university-wide initiative, Dr. Davis-Salazar will share her perspective on the challenges, opportunities, and rewards of "campus glocalization."

Association of American Colleges & Universities (AAC&U): Global Learning in College Conference

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