Current Students

Honors College Courses - Fall 2019

Please check back on a regular basis, as we will be adding new courses through the month of March.
Please use the Schedule Planner to see course availability.

IDH 2010 Acquisition of Knowledge

Description: Ranging from classical philosophy to the digital age, the course invites students to explore the different ways in which knowledge is created and consumed, how understanding is cultivated, the various relationships possible between knowledge and the self, and the implications of these in our contemporary world. Through an examination of common topics, studio experiences, and assignments, all sections of this course will explore different ways of knowing (e.g., historical, philosophical, scientific, creative, etc.) vis-à-vis:

  • Student lead seminar conversations
  • Online collaborative discussions
  • Studio and Workshop activities
  • Scholarly research and writing
  • Collaborative group projects

This course is part of the University of South Florida's General Education Curriculum. It is certified for Information & Data Literacy. Students enrolled in this course will be asked to participate in the USF General Education assessment effort. This will involve submitting copies of writing assignments for institutionel review via Canvas. The course is intended to offer a uniquely Honors approach to Information & Data Literacy, by examining shared topics, themes, and studio activities from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. Students should expect to expose and exhibit the unique value of interdisciplinary inquiry and how it contributes to scholarly citizenship and practical wisdom in our contemporary globally interconnected community. At the same time, this approach aims to synthesize the ideas of theory of knowledge and the best practices of information creation, curation, retrieval, and utilization in order to prepare students for the self-directed interdisciplinary research characteristic of Honors College courses.

IDH 2930 

Section: 050
Instructor: Tricia Penniecook
Title: Backstage Pass to Healthcare Professions
Day/Time: Monday | 4:00-4:50 PM
Description: In our currently evolving health care system, there is a growing emphasis on team-based approaches. Such approaches require that health professions training focus on interprofessional education. This course provides students who plan to pursue a health profession an opportunity to see what happens “backstage” in the health care field by shadowing interprofessional teams. The students will rotate among interprofessional teams that may consist of: medical students, residents, physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, pharmacists, physical therapists, social workers, health administrators, health educators, etc. The students will present their experiences during the class period and complete assignments in order to receive credit. This is a 1 CH course. 

Section: 901
Instructor: Patrick Cooper
Title: Pop Music Ensemble
Day/Time: Wednesday | 5:00-6:15 PM

Please contact instructor for more information: pkcooper@mail.usf.edu

Section: 902
Instructor: Celeste Ouwendijk-Thom
Title: Honors Chorus
Day/Time: Wednesday | 8:00-9:15 PM

Please contact instructor for more information: celeste10@mail.usf.edu

Section: 903
Instructor: Alec Pearl
Title: Honors Orchestra
Day/Time: Wednesday | 5:00-6:15 PM

Please contact instructor for more information: alecpearl@mail.usf.edu

Honors Arts and Humanities – IDH 3100

Section: 001
Instructor: Calvin Falwell
Title: Rock n’ Roll: The Music of a Generation
Day/Time: Tuesday/ Thursday | 9:30-10:45 AM
Description: The history of popular music is often presented as a sequence of innovations and events. The aim of this course, in contrast, is to study popular music in the United States in order to understand significant social, economic, and cultural transformations during the past century. We will trace important developments in technology, business, social life, and popular culture through American popular music. Simultaneously, we will discuss how popular music has reflected shifting attitudes about race, region, gender, and class. Particular attention will be devoted to the role that popular music played in the forging of a mass culture in which Americans, regardless of class, region, race, and gender, participated.

Section: 002
Instructor: Alan Bush
Title: Science Fiction & Heterotopias: envisioning & constructing flourishing cities
Day/Time: Monday/ WEdnesday | 12:30-1:45 PM
Description: This course will attempt to use the authorship of science fiction to shape the course of the future.If and how we flourish as individuals and communities is interdependent. Our experience of ourselves is strongly influenced by the community in which we live. Our communities are heavily influenced by the sorts of institutions that reproduce them. The sorts of institutions that exist within our communities is heavily influenced by what preceding generations thought possible. What our ancestors through possible was enabled & constrained by the art they experienced, as the distillation of the“desirable-possible.”  A flourishing community therefore depends upon having vibrant art. We live in the Urbanocene, a geologic era in which cities contain the majority of all humans, and urban society influences the geologic and biological composition of the globe.  This course will explore this question: what is the"desirable-possible” for our urban Earth? To explore this, the course will use case studies of heterotopias (an “other place” that stands outside of our experience) from reality and science fiction in order to prepare students for the authorship of short works of science fiction.  The course will be a writing group, reviewing, appreciating, contesting, nurturing, refining and contributing to each others’ work over the course of the semester.

Section: 003
Instructor: Theresa Woods
Title: Young Adult Literature: Representations of 21stCentury Youth in Fiction
Day/Time: Monday/ Wednesday | 12:30-1:45 PM
Description: Like many of its hallmark characters, young adult literature has truly come of age in the 21st century. Though it is often regarded as a 'lesser' section of fiction, young adult literature tackles heavy, timely themes while still being highly entertaining. In this course we will dive into several popular books to analyze and discuss major topics including sexuality, race, feminism, cultural barriers and mental health. Our reading list will include modern urban fantasy, science fiction, historical fiction, and memoirs. As the term progresses, students will consider their own personal narrative, and after reading several representations of youth, will write a short story based on their own lived experiences to conclude the course.


Section: 004
Instructor: Jared Ragland
Title: The Champion Image: Socially-Engaged Visual Storytelling
Day/Time: Friday | 9:30 AM -12:15 PM
Description: THE CHAMPION IMAGE: SOCIALLY-ENGAGED VISUAL STORYTELLING is a visual arts-based interdisciplinary course committed to scholarly engagement, creative collaboration, and compassionate conversation through documentary photography, social practice art, and interdisciplinary visual studies. The class will focus on the critical understanding and crafting of photographic images and social practice strategies – particularly those that involve individual citizens and communities and consider local social, economic, and ecological issues. Within the context of a variety disciplinary approaches (eg: social sciences, healthcare, history, etc.), students will investigate historical antecedents, contemporary practices, and strategies of critical interpretation of socially-conscious artworks and develop their own visual research projects. At the end of the semester, projects will be presented at the USF Centre Gallery. The class welcomes students from all disciplines. No prior experience in art or photography is required.

Section: 005
Instructor: Lindy Davidson
Title: Narrative Medicine
Day/Time: Tuesday/ Thursday | 11:00 AM-12:15 PM
Description: Medical institutions rely heavily on lists in order to communicate with and about patients (Browning, 1992), yet Arthur Frank (1995) says that patients find their way through illness by telling their stories. In order to improve understanding about patients’ perspectives of health and illness, their stories must be reclaimed from the diagnostic lists and treatments that dominate patient identities. As medical schools begin to select students based not only on their scientific acumen but also their understanding of the humanities, they are recognizing what Rita Charon (2008) states: “Along with their growing scientific expertise, doctors need the expertise to listen to their patients, to understand as best they can the ordeals of illness, to honor the meanings of their patients’ narratives of illness, and to be moved by what they behold so that they can act on their patients’ behalf” (p. 3).  In addition to aiding in their treatment of patients, narrative medicine offers a means for medical practitioners to reflect on difficult cases by exploring their emotions and personal challenges in a career that is marked by significant stress (Roscoe, 2012). Students will read illness narratives and the theoretical background of narrative medicine, develop their own personal narratives of health and illness, and work with others to narrativize their illness experiences.
 

Section: 006
Instructor: Ulluminair Salim
Title: Narrative Cartography
Day/Time: Monday / Wednesday | 2:00-3:15PM
Description: “You can kiss your family and friends goodbye and put miles between you, but at the same time you carry them with you in your heart, your mind, your stomach; because you do not just live in a world but a world lives in you.”—Frederick Buechner, Author and Theologian. Cartography is the study and practice of map-making, and NarrativeCartography invites students to map the stories of their lives, challenging traditional notions of space, place, and structure. Through reading, writing, and multilayered forms of journeying, students will examine manifold ways to tell stories that matter, from the mundane to the profound. This practice-oriented course leverages both written narrative and traditional and contemporary cartographic methods to visit personal places seldom explored. 

Section: 007
Instructor: Jeffery Donley
Title: Rocking the Dead Sea Scrolls
Day/Time: Monday/ Wednesday |  9:30-10:45 AM
Description: In March 1947, a young Bedouin goat herder followed two of his wandering goats into the cliffs along the northwestern shore of the Dead Sea. After one of the goats entered an opening in the rocks, Muhammad picked up a rock and tossed it through a second opening. Hearing the sound of breaking pottery, he entered the cave and found scrolls wrapped in linen clothe inside clay jars. Young Muhammad literally “rocked” the Dead Sea Scrolls. The Dead Sea Scrolls have been hailed as the greatest, most important, and dramatic discoveries of the 20th century. In this course students will explore the discovery of around 1000 ancient manuscripts (dating from the third century BC to the first century AD) in eleven caves on the northwestern shore of the Dead Sea. The content of this multi-media course is an interdisciplinary approach that integrates literature, history, language, sociology, archeology, films, published articles, and special research conducted by your professor and from Dr. Norman Golb, one of the leading experts in the field. Students will make a detailed study of aspects of the Hebrew Bible or Old Testament, sectarianism in the Second Temple Judaism, the archaeological site of Khirbet Qumran, Biblical texts from the eleven caves, the Copper Scroll, relationship to the beginnings of Christianity, and its laws in comparison to contemporary Jewish Halakhah. All readings are in English.

Section: 008

Instructor: Marquese McFerguson
Title: Storytelling & Spoken Word Poetry
Day/Time: Tuesday/ Thursday | 5:00-6:15 PM
Description: This course examines spoken word poetry’s history and the performative, storytelling, and literary principles that make it a celebrated international art form that has become woven into the fabric of American popular culture (movies, music, theater, etc.). This course challenges the notion that spoken word poetry is simply the act of individuals quoting flowery wordplay. Conversely, it invites students to examine the various ways spoken word poetry is a communicative/aesthetic practice and mode of embodied inquiry that enables individuals to craft narratives as a way to understand, cope with, communicate, and critically analyze social experiences. From Emily Dickenson, Shakespeare, the Last Poets, and James Baldwin, to Kendrick Lamar, J. Cole, and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, this course invites students to investigate the writing/performative techniques of classic and contemporary storytellers. In the process, students will develop their ability to become more inventive/effective communicators in a variety of professional and creative settings.

Section: 009
Instructor: Marquese McFerguson
Title: Beyond Beats & Rhymes: An Introduction to Hip Hop Studies
Day/Time: Tuesday/ Thursday | 2:00-3:15 PM
Description: This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of hip hop studies and invites them to see hip hop as more than “just music”. This course critically explores hip hop history, aesthetics, pedagogy, dance, fashion, poetry, visual art, and language in an attempt to illuminate the art form’s sonic, social, cultural, and political impact. From the deejay, to the graffiti artist, to the emcee, within this course, each foundational element within hip hop culture will be used as a creative-intellectual lens to investigate how the art form has influenced the ways in which we see, perform, and interpret race, gender, class, religion, sexuality, and lived experiences on a regional, national, and international level. 

 

Honors Natural Sciences – IDH 3350

Section: 002
Instructor: Richard Bargielski
Title: The History and Culture of Science
Day/Time: Tuesday/ Thursday | 2:00-3:15 PM
Description: When one thinks about science, their minds often conjure up images of numbers on computers or beakers filled with colored liquids. But science is not an isolated process; it is a social institution and practice conducted by people including you and your professors. In this course we will examine the historical development of science as a social institution, beginning with the philosophical underpinnings of empiricism and ending in the present day. We will use an interdisciplinary perspective that draws readings from anthropology, sociology, history, and science-technology studies (STS) to examine the values, beliefs, and practices that comprise a scientific system of inquiry. We will address key dimensions of the scientific process that often go unnoticed. For example: How do scientists with competing findings settle debates in their field? Why does the scientific method usually require us to start with a hypothesis? What is the difference between hypothetical and theoretical thinking? How are science and technology used to reinforce or advance power structures? A key part of this course will be firsthand experience conducting observations in a scientific lab and interviewing scientists about their work. 


Section: 003
Instructor: Kevin MacKay
Title: Science Fiction, Science Fact
Day/Time: Friday | 9:30 AM-12:15 PM
Description: This is a seminar style course exploring facts and fiction in the astronomy media. We will explore a selection of science fiction movies and novels along with Art and popular culture which has an astronomy basis and we will critique the ideas presented. Students will explore what is fact, what is feasible and what is pure fiction and will have the opportunity to express their learning via a class project which may have a scientific or artistic emphasis.


Section: 004
Instructor: Judy McIlrath
Title: Geology of National Parks
Day/Time: Tuesday/ Thursday | 3:30-4:45 PM
Description: Why do we have public lands set aside as National Parks? What geologic processes created the variety of landscapes so unique that our predecessors mandated that those landscapes be preserved? In our growing need for natural resources, should we exploit the resources of the parks? Students will have the opportunity to express their learning by researching a national Park of their choice as a term project which may have both a scientific and creative emphasis. An optional field trip to several National Parks, most likely in Arizona, will be a consideration for the enthusiastic! 

Section: 005
Instructor: David Naar
Title: Marine Estuaries
Day/Time: Friday | 9:30 AM-12:15 PM
Description: This course is team taught by Geological, Physical, Chemical, and Biological oceanographers and is designed to introduce students to the unique marine environment of estuaries. While the course covers Estuaries in general, we will focus on Tampa Bay to provide data to practice using the scientific method.  Three field trips are required as part of the class: one to the College of Marine Science in St. Pete for a visit of facilities and ships, another to the Tampa Bay Authority, and a third is a 12-hour cruise (7:00-19:00) on the R/V Hogarth in Tampa Bay, out to the Gulf and then back to port. Grading is based attendance, participation, on a written report (a scientific analysis of the data collected in Tampa Bay) and a ~10 minute presentation of their written report. A prerequisite for participation is a passing grade in either an introductory Earth Science or Oceanography course prior to this more advanced course.

Section: 007
Instructor: Steven Specter
Title: How Microbes and People Get Along
Day/Time: Tuesday | 8:00 - 9:15 AM
Description: This is an interactive course based on reading articles and discussing in class how microorganisms affect our daily lives. The course will offer an understanding of the scientific method, both common and exotic infections, how our immune systems protect us from infections, and class discussions of the topics that students decide are important. A few sessions will be devoted to current events in microbiology drawn from current popular press. The class will include the opportunity for students to explore in depth topics that are of interest to them using both written and oral reports.

 

Honors Social/Behavioral Sciences – IDH 3400

Section: 001
Instructor: Cam Silver
Title: Queer Theory
Day/Time: Monday/ Wednesday | 3:30-4:45 PM
Description: Queer Theory has its academic roots in critical theory, constructivism, feminism, and critical race theory.  This class will start with the academic beginning of Queer theory literature by reading Michel Foucault's The History of Sexuality. This class will examine  ( not to be limited) the significant scholars of Queer Theory such as Judith Butler, Kimberlé Crenshaw, Nancy Fraser, and Jose Esteban Muñoz.  The field of queer theory is fluid; therefore,  we are especially interested in scholars whose work concerns the relationship of sexuality to race, nationalism, intersectionality, globalization, and colonialism.
 
Section: 002
Instructor: Laura Kihlstrom
Title: Food, Globalization, and Migration: The American Melting Pot
Day/Time: Monday/ Wednesday | 11:00 AM-12:15 PM
Description: The U.S. is a country of various regional cuisines, influenced by waves of forced and voluntary migrations consisting of Native Americans, Anglo-Saxon settlers, enslaved Africans, and successive waves of European, Asian, African, and Latin American immigrants. Even the national narrative of the country as an ostensible melting pot of cultures implies a culinary aspect and aspiration: to be American, and to become American, means to live in a country of immigrants who have all given it a flavor with their distinct traditions. Yet throughout the country’s history, what has been considered ‘proper’ food has always been intricately connected to complex questions of race, class, and ethnicity. In this class, we explore questions such as: How and why does food matter for national identity? What is American food? What type of foods are accepted as American? How should one eat to be accepted as an American? How does one’s physical and social space in the U.S. food system affect the types of foods available for consumption?

Section: 003
Instructor: Lisa Zonni Spinazola
Title: Emotions: Experience, Expression, and Understanding
Day/Time: Tuesday/ Thursday | 2:00-3:15 PM
Description: What accounts for the differences in how we understand and experience emotions like guilt, love, shame, joy, gratitude, regret, hope, or anger? Knowledge and expression of emotions are impacted by how we are raised, culture, gender, personalities, style of interaction, and current life stressors. We will extend our understanding of emotions through various lenses and disciplines: psychology, sociology, biology, communication, and social construction. Cognitive Behavioral therapy posits if we change our ways of thinking, we can impact the emotions we feel, and ultimately change behaviors that cause disruption and distress in our lives. Can it be this simple? Paul Ekman studies the universality of emotions, physiological responses to (and causes of) basic or foundational emotional states, as well as the importance of displaying and expressing emotions to the formation and maintenance of interpersonal relationships. Deborah Tannen writes about the origins of, problems that arise, and ways to better understand the gendered language of emotions. Combining photography and electronic journaling with either Tumblr or Instagram, we’ll add texture and visuals to the expression of emotional states we’ll discuss over the course of the semester. For the final project, students will choose a relationship (and its various emotions) or an emotion (through various relationships) to write about and show how their understanding has changed and/or developed over the course of the semester. 

Section: 004
Instructor: Nana Tutinya
Title: Health, Illness, and Society
Day/Time: Tuesday/ Thursday | 9:30-10:45 AM
Description: How do people define health or illness? These concepts have much importance to us personally, but they also carry social meaning tied to individuals’ status and behavior as well as the attitudes toward them from fellow citizens. Similarly, medicine is more than a science, it is also a social institution that is built on human relationships and fulfills important societal needs. This discussion-based course will explore illness subjectivity, social and cultural determinants of health, doctor-patient interaction, stigmatization of chronic and mental illness, and the development of a new vision of health as an all-encompassing wellness phenomenon. In the end we might find that good health is much more than our own need or interest, it’s a profoundly social experience rooted in specific cultural and temporal frameworks.

Section: 005
Instructor: Nana Tutinya
Title: Sociology of Influence
Day/Time: Monday/ Wednesday | 11:00 AM-12:15 PM
Description: How do we make decisions in everyday life? What makes us buy a certain product, choose somebody as a friend, or select a place to live or work? If we are in charge (as we all like to think) why do we so often end up with a dress that doesn’t quite fit, with a subscription for a magazine that’s never read, or spend an afternoon with a neighbor we don’t have any interest in talking to? Why do we opt to do things other people want rather than things we would like to be doing, and how can we resist that?
This course will explore the sociological and social psychological mechanisms of influence and compliance gaining in advertising, politics, and everyday life. Wherever we go, we are surrounded by persuasion messages of all sorts. Politicians compete for our votes, businesses and advertisers for our money, technology developers for our attention. Quite often the influence on our decisions is so subtle we don’t even notice that we were manipulated into taking a certain course of action. Although not all influence is negative or strategic, understanding what makes us vulnerable to specific influence strategies and an ability to recognize them in different social settings make us more aware and more independent social actors.
 
 
Section: 006
Instructor: Holly Singh
Title: Masculinities, Health, and (Dis)Order
Day/Time: Tuesday/ Thursday | 9:30-10:45 AM
Description: This course centers on how masculinities influence health behaviors, outcomes, and ethical debates in the contemporary world, introducing and drawing on methods of inquiry, discovery, and knowledge creation from the social and behavioral sciences. Topics will include: making gender and gendered bodies; sexuality and changing gender roles; family and male honor; men's health; and masculinities in religion, nationalism, violence, and global commerce.
 
Section: 007
Instructor: Alan Bush
Title: Compassionate Cities: An Emerging Social Development
Day/Time: Monday/ Wednesday | 9:30-10:45 AM
Description: "Cities have the capability of providing something for everybody, only because, and only when, they are created by everybody."
--Jane Jacobs, The Life and Death of Great American Cities
 What are cities? How do they function and to what ends? Who develops them, and who are they designed to serve? By extension, who has a place within them, and who is excluded? How can we change cities for good? These questions have catalyzed a new social movement in the Tampa Bay Area known as the "compassionate city," and they are the very questions that animate our course.
 Our course presents a unique opportunity to engage with the compassionate city movement here in the Tampa Bay Area, examining the limits and possibilities of compassion to ameliorate social suffering within urban landscapes. Thus we can leverage this historical moment to learn, question, and contribute.
 Following our (de) construction of who and what constitute a city, we will examine theories of compassion as a catalyst for social action.  For, examining the underlying mechanisms of large social forces is essential to participate, shape, resist, foster and/or germinate social movements ourselves. Course will be taught jointly by Drs. Salim & Bush
 
 
Section: 008
Instructor: Melvin James
Title: Biospsychosocial Components of Health
Day/Time: Monday/ Wednesday | 11:00 AM-12:15 PM
Description: Only those on the approved list will be given a permit to register for this course (see Mr. Mejias if you have any questions, and to get on the list).  This course provides scientific inquiry, reasoning skills and content areas for the Psychological and Social Foundations of Behavior for the new MCAT 2015. In this course, human behavior and illness are viewed from a systemic rather than a reductionist perspective. The combination of biological, psychological and social determinants, and their contributions to behavior and health, is examined from critical analysis and evidence-based problem solving approaches.
 
Section: 009
Instructor: Greg Herbert
Title: Society vs. Nature in the Capitalocene
Day/Time: Tuesday/ Thursday | 11:00 AM-12:15 PM
Description: The enduring metabolic relations between ‘society’ and ‘nature’ are nearing collapse, but explanations for why this is happening vary. On the one hand, some scholars and policymakers argue that the primary causes for our current biospheric crisis are rooted in deep environmental transformations related to humanity’s demographic explosion. It is against this background that mostly earth system and environmental scientists have espoused the idea of a new geological age, the Anthropocene, as a means to comprehend the totality of the environmental changes to our planet in recent decades. Scholars and policymakers in the social sciences and humanities, however, offer a different conceptual framework - the Capitalocene - which insists that the relations between ‘society’ and ‘nature’ are defined and conditioned not by population growth but more fundamentally by the machinations of global capitalism. They argue that capitalism is inherently anti-ecological, because it systematically subordinates nature in the pursuit of endless accumulation, production, consumption and disposal on ever larger geographical and ever faster temporal scales. This course is designed to stimulate critical thinking skills and initiate lively and informed discussions about our current ecological crisis. These debates take earth systems and economic theories and show how they are applied to current, real-world public policy challenges and opportunities, the outcomes of which will have immediate and long-term social, political, economic and environmental impacts. How these debates are resolved will affect taxation, job creation, city formation, education, etc. In short, these debates will shape future of the world in which we now live.  

Section: 010
Instructor: Melvin James
Title: Biospsychosocial Components of Health
Day/Time: Monday/ Wednesday | 3:30-4:45 PM
Description:  This course provides scientific inquiry, reasoning skills and content areas for the Psychological and Social Foundations of Behavior for the new MCAT 2015. In this course, human behavior and illness are viewed from a systemic rather than a reductionist perspective. The combination of biological, psychological and social determinants, and their contributions to behavior and health, is examined from critical analysis and evidence-based problem solving approaches. This course is enrolled by permit only.  Please see Mr. Mejias for a permit.

 

Honors Seminar in Applied Ethics – IDH 3600

Section: 001
Instructor: John Dormois
Title: Biomedical Ethics
Day/Time: Tuesday/ Thursday | 8:00-9:15 AM
Description: This seminar in applied medical ethics will cover a variety of subjects that will be primarily practical rather than purely philosophical. Topics to be explored include: experimentation on human subjects, access to care, health care disparities, abortion, and the right to die. The primary objective will be to develop a method for approaching ethical issues in medicine. Students will be primarily responsible to leading discussions with minimal formal lecturing. (Permit required for this section only – see Mr. Mejias for details)
 
Section: 002
Instructor: John Dormois
Title: Biomedical Ethics
Day/Time: Tuesday/ Thursday | 9:30-10:45 AM
Description: This seminar in applied medical ethics will cover a variety of subjects that will be primarily practical rather than purely philosophical. Topics to be explored include: experimentation on human subjects, access to care, health care disparities, abortion, and the right to die. The primary objective will be to develop a method for approaching ethical issues in medicine. Students will be primarily responsible to leading discussions with minimal formal lecturing.
 
Section: 003
Instructor: Lindy Davidson
Title: Ethics at the End of Life
Day/Time: Tuesday/ Thursday | 9:30-10:45 AM
Description: Death is a taboo topic in American culture, in spite of the 100% chance that every human will eventually experience it. This aversion to serious consideration and conversation regarding death, even among physicians, results in a lack of preparation for many people at the end of life. In this course in applied ethics, students will examine the intersection of medical ethics and end-of-life care. We will look at the history of ethics and decision-making by examining notable cases from U.S. history that challenged laws and often led to new healthcare policy. Students will consider multiple end-of-life contexts including pediatric illness, cultural perspectives, the impact of religion, and institutional influences. Students will also examine the tools used by healthcare professionals to address ethics at the end of life. This interactive course will engage students by using creative arts activities, reading responses, and perspective taking. Students will identify popular media references to end-of-life and explore the ways in which media shapes the cultural conversation surrounding end-of-life decision-making and advance care planning. The course will culminate in a final research project in which students create a media piece that contributes to the on-going cultural conversation regarding end-of-life.
 
Section: 004
Instructor: Ulluminair Salim
Title: Compassionate Cities: An Emerging Social Development
Day/Time: Monday/ Wednesday | 9:30-10:45 AM
Description: "Cities have the capability of providing something for everybody, only because, and only when, they are created by everybody."
--Jane Jacobs, The Life and Death of Great American Cities
 What are cities? How do they function and to what ends? Who develops them, and who are they designed to serve? By extension, who has a place within them, and who is excluded? How can we change cities for good? These questions have catalyzed a new social movement in the Tampa Bay Area known as the "compassionate city," and they are the very questions that animate our course.
 Our course presents a unique opportunity to engage with the compassionate city movement here in the Tampa Bay Area, examining the limits and possibilities of compassion to ameliorate social suffering within urban landscapes. Thus we can leverage this historical moment to learn, question, and contribute.
 Following our (de) construction of who and what constitute a city, we will examine theories of compassion as a catalyst for social action.  For, examining the underlying mechanisms of large social forces is essential to participate, shape, resist, foster and/or germinate social movements ourselves. Course will be taught jointly by Drs. Salim & Bush
 
Section: 006
Instructor: Raman Sachdev
Title: Mental Illness, Suicide, and Moral Responsibility
Day/Time: Tuesday/ Thursday | 12:30-1:45 PM
Description: This course will begin with close readings of historical philosophical and theological texts that discuss the phenomenon we call "mental illness". From the devastating universal anxiety which is discussed by the compassionate Buddha to the scathing remarks of and about the "madman" made by Nietzsche, these readings will help inform our current understanding of mental illness. We will also engage with contemporary research and case studies in psychology and psychiatry that reveal the variety and severity of mental illness. As we move into the second part of the course, ethical questions regarding suicide will be raised. Why do people commit suicide? Is it always the case that when someone takes his or her life, there is a concurrent underlying mental illness? What moral judgments, if any, can be made about those who do commit suicide? And, finally, with our developing knowledge about the pervasiveness of mental illness and suicide, in the final part of the course we will talk about moral responsibility. What duties do we have to our fellows if we suspect mental health issues? What if these issues are not merely suspected, but apparent? In contrast, is it ever justifiable or even morally sound not to intervene in such cases? Analyzing and discussing current corporate and institutional policies on the matter (e.g. those that are instituted at universities like USF) will help us to answer these questions.
 
Section: 007
Instructor: Dan Ruth
Title: Civic Literacy and Current Events
Day/Time: Thursday 8:00-10:45 AM
Description: This course will examine the week's current events and explore our civic institutions of local, state and federal government. Students will be expected to come to class well-versed in the days breaking news events and be prepared to discuss these issues in class. There is no textbook. Students will be required to read The Tampa Bay Times, listen to National Public Radio and watch various news programs. There will be a weekly quiz. Students also will be divided into teams and take turns preparing a weekly presentation on some news topic. There will also be an end-of-semester project presentation.

Section: 008
Instructor: Greg McCreery
Title: Weighing the Morality of Political Ideologies
Day/Time: Monday/ Wednesday | 2:00-3:15 PM
Description: We are all born into a political structure with its peculiar systems of legality, economics, and culture, bound together by competing political ideologies. In a sense, there is no escape. Yet, because political structures and systems are in conflict with others, we have diverse, ideological perspectives at our disposal, with which we can critique, and discover the limits and promises of political structures and systems, and their corresponding ideological beliefs concerning human existence and relationships. Whether theocratic, authoritarian, democratic, liberal, conservative, nationalistic, communistic, fascistic, or anarchistic, political structures govern human lives under ideological beliefs that always have moral implications. The issue is determining which kinds of political structures and systems, as well as the political ideologies that ground them, are best capable of orienting human life in the most promising, moral ways, particularly in our globalized world, which confronts contemporary issues never before encountered by humanity. This course will, with a critical approach, review descriptive and normative theories concerning political structures, the ideologies that underpin them, and various perspectives on the needs for transforming them. We will cover historically influential moral theories, and investigate numerous political theories, and their historical implications and applications, particularly in relation to how and why wars are claimed to be morally justifiable, the means by which modern states are conceived of as providing protection in exchange for obedience, the nature of political obligations, attempts to address cultural diversity and to produce inclusiveness, the values and norms that governments should uphold and respect, and how efforts toward peace are developed internationally, nationally, and locally.

 

Honors Geographical Perspectives – IDH 4200

Section: 001
Instructor: Cam Silver
Title: Global Political Violence
Day/Time: Tuesday/ Thrusday | 3:30-4:45 PM
Description: This course aims to help students understand the dynamics of international conflict.  This class will look at the various theories of conflict  ( not to be limited) such as Marxist, Rational Choice, Realist, and Liberal theories.  We will examine different types of conflicts such as: Revolutions, Civil Wars, Coups, Interstate Wars, and Genocide. We will conclude the semester by looking more directly at how violence ends, how peace is maintained, and how societies attempt to heal from past violence. We may use modern case studies such as the Rwandan Genocide, 9/11 Terrorist attacks, ISIS, and the Arab Spring so that students can effectively understand the dynamics of global political violence. 
 
Section: 002
Instructor: Fenda Akiwumi
Title: Sub-Saharan Africa
Day/Time: Tuesday/ Thursday | 9:30-10:45 AM
Description: This course will look at culture, societies and development in Sub-Saharan Africa in historical and contemporary context. It will be a broad interdisciplinary introduction to the study of this part of the African continent. Africa's history, politics, cultures, and societies are rich, diverse, and complex yet generalizations and negative stereotypes about Africa by the media, academics, and policy-makers are common (apocalyptic scenarios of civil war, poverty, famine, diseases such as AIDS and failed states, for example). Using selected case studies we will explore political, economic, and socio-cultural characteristics of both modern and traditional Africa and through critical evaluation of course materials obtain a more balanced portrayal of the continent and its development.
 
Section: 003
Instructor: Nazek Jawad
Title: Contemporary Middle East: Political Challenges in a Global Age
Day/Time: Tuesday/ Thrusday | 12:30-1:45 PM
Description: Recently, the Middle East is conceived as a region that breeds fundamentalism and an area of long-lasting conflicts. Due to the distorted notions and misrepresentations of the Middle East circulated and promoted in corporate media, and in conventional media outlets as well, this course is set into a great mission. This course aims to provide students with an authentic understanding of the diversified multi-layered facets of the Middle East, and to expose them to the breadth of Middle Eastern cultures, and their political and cultural landmarks within historical and contemporary contexts. This course discusses the main social, economic, and political developments in the Middle East from the 19th century onward. Topics to be covered include, but are not limited to: colonial legacies; Islamic Sharia Laws, identity politics, social movements, Arab uprisings, women and politics in the Middle East, terrorism, and development. Besides, this course also highlights the Middle East abundant culture, and introduces students to countless contributions of Middle East countries to human civilizations in wide range of areas, including science, arts, architecture, and music. The aim of this course is to broaden students' intellectual perspective by introducing them to the geography, history, politics, political economy, culture, and arts of the Middle East. Another equally important goal of this course is to impart appreciation of cultures other than their own, by introducing them to the diversified cultures of the Middle East.
 
Section: 004
Instructor: Nana Tutinya
Title: Ukraine: Social and Cultural Landscapes
Day/Time: Tuesday/ Thursday | 11:00 AM-12:15 PM
Description: Thrown into the middle of geopolitical controversy surrounding Crimea and its rebellious East, Ukraine remains largely unknown to its Western supporters. The country's rich and complex history, its evolving relationship with a powerful neighboring nation, Russia, shaped the cultural backdrop against which the recent events are unfolding. This course will look into significant experiences that helped form public attitudes, traditions, and social practices throughout the Ukrainian turbulent past. It will also explore the population make up of this largest country in Europe by land mass, and its struggle to overcome the remnants of the soviet regime. The focus of the class is on society and its culture rather than politics, with the aim of understanding the attitudes and the aspirations that are building a way for the future of this Eastern European nation.
 
Section: 005
Instructor: Alma Dedic
Title: Transitional Justice
Day/Time: Monday/ Wednesday | 11:00 AM-12:15 PM
Description: In the realm of international politics, countries in transition from an authoritarian regime to democracy or from war to peace often face multiple transitions and different challenges, for instance the challenge of overcoming past abuses of human rights such as political executions, ethnic cleansing or mass murder. Such societies at times reach for transitional justice mechanisms to redress past atrocities and human rights violations. Transitional justice mechanisms consist of judicial and non-judicial measures, including truth-seeking mechanisms, reparation programs and institutional reforms. This complex set of measures if applied in counties in transition can offer reconciliatory elements for grieving and often divided societies on their path to democracy and global trends.
This course will offer an exploration of Transitional Justice mechanisms using real-life examples and experiences from around the world. Yet, together we will reach even further and look into our own society and communities we live in. What can we learn from societies in transition? Can we apply such measures and experiences in our own society and communities? In this course students will practice how to bridge the gap between academic concepts, and real life project design and implementation in complex environment (such as conflict sensitive and/or divided communities) using problem solving approaches and tools such as visual material. This course may be of particular interest to students in the field of law, politics, international relations, psychology, sociology, criminology, planning, history, and ethics. Through a series of thematic sessions, case studies, workshops, round table and focus group discussions from human right and political perspectives this course is designed to also enhance students' critical thinking, teamwork and problem solving skills.
 
Section: 006
Instructor: Dan Ruth
Title: Post-WW2 History, Television, and Global Political Events
Day/Time: Friday | 9:30 AM-12:15 PM
Description: This course will examine the relationship between the significant news events of Post-World War II global history as covered by television. The course will explore how news events shaped the evolution of television and how television influenced the framing of current events. Students will study such topics such as the Army-McCarthy Hearings, the emergence of the documentary form of reporting, the Kennedy-Nixon debates, the Kennedy assassination, Vietnam, the Watergate scandal, the Iran hostage crisis, the Clinton impeachment, the Iraq wars, the election of the United States' first black president and the rise of Donald Trump. It is critical that students taking this course enter the classroom with some fundamental prior understanding of the material to be covered. This course is designed to enhance a student's understanding of historical and current events as well as the medium of television's role in influencing the public's perception of society. Students will also be required to make a weekly presentation assigned by the instructor, as well as prepare an end-of-term project of their own design. Students will also take a 20-question weekly current events quiz.
 
Section: 007
Instructor: Linda Tavernier-Almada
Title: Globalization and Cultural Pluralism
Day/Time: Monday/ Wednesday | 3:30-4:45 PM
Description: Around the globe, traditional cultural beliefs guide much of human behavior. Various aspects of traditional cultural beliefs and norms inform the everyday decisions of average citizens, world leaders, CEOs, and other people of influence. The impact that traditional beliefs have on the behavior of people across the globe is often not understood by most Americans. Typically, aside from the superficial information that they get from their TVs or short tourist trips, most Americans are completely unfamiliar with the fundamental cultural concepts that guide the behaviors of people in other countries. Yet, because we now live in a global society, it is crucial that we understand which cultural traditions and beliefs are motivating the people in the communities and markets that are intertwined around the globe. In this course, students will become cultural pluralistsby developing the skill sets needed to identify a broad range of international cultural norms and beliefs.
 
Section: 008
Instructor: Linda Tavernier-Almada
Title: Cultural Identity and Social Class
Day/Time: Monday/ Wednesday | 5:00-6:15 PM
Description: The fight for social capital within social class structures can be brutal if the group trying to achieve the desired social status is culturally different from the dominant group. In turn, the exclusion of a group from standard avenues of social mobility can create such devastating consequences for the marginalized group that it creates and foments a counterculture. Using readings from various fields of study and select films from around the world, we will look at the struggles for sociocultural status taking place across the globe. Through an interdisciplinary lens, we will look at groups like the Gypsies of Slovakia, the street children of Brazil, the Untouchables of India, the teenage Muslims in France, the woman of Afghanistan, etc. Our goal will be to advance solutions for some of the real-world problems we discover during the semester.
 
Section: 009
Instructor: Hema Ramachandran
Title: Diaspora in Tampa Bay: Communities in Conflict or Confluence?
Day/Time: Monday/ Wednesday | 2:00-3:15 PM
Description: The term diaspora (from Greek meaning "scattering across" or "dispersion") is arguably a fundamental human condition in our current era of globalization. But delving into the origins of any country, one finds that immigration, movement, and dispersion have been part of the foundational core of all nations; this historical reality becomes an especially poignant and productive lens through which to view current political rhetoric about immigration, refugee crises, and wall-building. The course will critically examine past and present practices of nation, diaspora, culture, and identity in the Tampa Bay area and beyond. Essential questions we will address are: how do individuals and communities recreate themselves on other shores often imagining a "home nation" outside physical boundaries and tangible reference points? Does the sense of "in-between-ness" always carry a progressive enabling political charge or does it sometimes force folks to hunker down into rigid cultural fixities? What role do cultural expressions like food, music, religion, and language play within and outside diaspora groups? What is the relevance of these discourses to our own socio-cultural perspectives and positions? You will bring your own questions and insights and we will attempt to grapple with these issues via a focus on cultural production including theoretical and literary texts, films and videos. This seminar-style class will involve reading, reflection, research, field trips, and hands-on activities.
 
Section: 010
Instructor: Hema Ramachandran
Title: Translating the Language of International Cinema
Day/Time: Monday/ Wednesday | 3:30-4:45 PM
Description: This course will focus on how films create social-cultural meaning in different geographical and historical contexts. Using a wide range of international examples, we will observe how the visual language of film can both reflect and create differing social identity and practices, while also engaging the universal-particular dialectic.  In so doing, we will seek to use the interactional dance of particular cultures with universal themes/affiliations as evidence for the ways in which movies foster a mindset of global citizenship while simultaneously demonstrating the significance of local, individual, and regional engagement.
 
Section: 011
Instructor: Sabah Uddin
Title: Global Graphica
Day/Time: Monday/ Wednesday | 9:30-10:45 AM
Description: Internationally, graphica (comic books and graphic novels collectively) is growing in both popularity and legitimacy as a literary/art form. This course will critically examine this distinct genre of visual rhetoric, specifically focusing on global examples of graphic novels and film. Valerie Babb argues, “Graphic novels present a useful site for examining how images are engaged to expand considerations of race and culture.” Taking a cue, we will examine this mode of narrative from a communication perspective and in particular, explore how the graphica medium engages within a cultural conversation by giving voice to, in particular, stories of marginalization and oppression. By studying both film and novels in graphic form as text, we will look at how authors/filmmakers represent social justice issues (social inequalities, immigration, war, religion) around the world. We will consider how graphic novels/films inform the ways in which said issues are represented in larger society and work to promote social justice. Further, we will engage with the following questions: How does the genre depict race, ethnicity, gender, religion, power, privilege and war? How does it counter stereotypes or reinforce them? How do these texts work within literary traditions to explore said issues? Is the genre successful in achieving its purported goals?
 
Section: 012
Instructor: Angsumala Tamang
Title: Music, Nationalism, and (Post)Colonialism in South Asia
Day/Time: Tuesday | 2:00-4:45 PM
Description: If global politics in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries marked the effects of European colonialism in South Asia, the second half of the twentieth century and twenty-first century are often characterized as belonging to an era of post-colonialism. Post-colonialism, of course implies that the struggle for national liberation from colonial rule has been "successful" and that the formerly colonized "state" and its people are now independent of foreign control. However, does it mean that the centuries of imposed imperial rule and cultural dominance ends with the formation of an independent nation-state? Or, does the colonial legacy continues via processes of nation-building, music-making, gender relations, and culture works that underpin colonial theories within complex juxtaposition of socio-historical associations and traditional hierarchies? Starting with South Asia – India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka – we will travel onwards to Southeast Asia via Myanmar, Vietnam, Cambodia, Indonesia, and the Philippines. The readings will focus on theoretical discussions and critical thinking with the objective of stimulating interdisciplinary understanding of postcolonial realities in terms of music performance, music production, and film studies in relation to the politics of representation – region, religion, language, gender, class and caste. No prior technical knowledge of music or musical terms is required for this course.
 
Section: 013
Instructor: Jeffery Donley
Title: The Afterlife in the Ancient World
Day/Time: Monday/ Wednesday | 8:00-9:15 AM
Description: It’s a universal truth: Everyone—including you—will eventually die. After thousands of years of pondering it, we still find death one of life’s most perplexing mysteries. This interdisciplinary course explores religious, ethical, psychological, sociological, and cultural dimensions of death and the afterlife in the ancient world as seen through a cultural history of ideas, practices, architecture, reliefs, and archaeology, relating to death and the afterlife. Students will investigate primary sourcesfor the concept of the afterlife in Egyptian theology of death, mummification, and the afterlife, the Greco-Roman concept of Hades, the Hebrew concept of Sheol, and Christianity’s ideology of Hades, Heaven, and Hell.
 
Section: 014
Instructor: David Jenkins
Title: Comedy in a Global Context
Day/Time: Tuesday/ Thursday | 2:00-3:15 PM
Description: From the plays of Aristophanes to Sacha Baron Cohen's This is America comedy has been been used as a form of entertainment and a tool for critique. This course takes both a global and historical approach to how comedy works (or doesn't). Students will develop a firm theoretical foundation before examining specific comedic artifacts from the past and present. This course draws on continental philosophy, communication theory, performance studies, sociology, and theater studies. Comedy is fraught, the idea that it's all "just jokes" doesn't remove the potential for unintended consequences, and so by examining it from multiple perspectives students will develop a deeper understanding and appreciation for the greater world we inhabit.
 

 

IDH 4930- Honors Special Topics (not a core course)

Section: 001
Instructor: A'naja Newsome
Title: Critical Issues in Sport and Recreation
Day/Time: Monday/ Wednesday | 2:00-3:15 PM
Description: This course will examine critical topics in the field of sport, recreation, and wellness services from a broad perspective and an in depth focus within the context of university populations. Topics used for class discussions include race and role perception, diversity, mental health, the influence of mass media as well as other trends in research. Students will engage in critical thinking, explore and discuss ideas found in scholarly literature, and participate in an original research project related to trends and controversial topics. 
 

 

IDH 4950 Honors Capstone: Meets FKL writing intensive or capstone requirements - student's choice!

Section: 001
Instructor: Catherine Wilkins
Title: Connections: Mental Healthcare, Community Engagement, and Art
Day/Time: Wednesday | 2:00-4:45 PM
Description: Connections: Mental Healthcare, Community Engagement, and Artis a service learning course, meaning that we integrate community service with guided reflection into the curriculum to enhance and enrich student learning of course material. In this collaboration between the USF Honors College and the Tampa Museum of Art, Honors students learn about medical conditions such as dementia, depression, and PTSD and are trained to facilitate interactions with works of art for patient groups dealing with these diagnoses. No experience with art is required. The program is based on the Meet Me at MOMA Alzheimer's Project, which strove to make art accessible to people with dementia, and has been highly successful and lauded by healthcare professionals, museum staff, and participants alike. This class will train students in the Visual Thinking Strategies method of art exploration, which allows participants to give their own personal interpretations of works of art without fear of judgment or failure. Particularly in people with Alzheimer's, depression, and PTSD, this method has been found to help patients access and express memories, practice or regain their communication skills, externalize emotions, relieve stress and anxiety, and promote positive emotions. This capstone course will allow students to participate in furthering the research in these areas by providing an immersive experience at the intersection of art, medicine, and mental health. This class will also instruct students in the practices of observation, deep listening, and critical thinking, build empathy and understanding, and engage students with the community. Please note that this class meets at the Tampa Museum of Art – please allow time for traveling back and forth when you are planning your schedule. Transportation is not provided. FOR FULL CONSIDERATION, STUDENTS MUST APPLY BY MARCH 15 TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS COURSE. DECISIONS WILL BE GIVEN BY MARCH 20. APPLY HERE: https://goo.gl/forms/1gpVC5MZ9rz5Ysmm1

Section: 002
Instructor: Catherine Wilkins
Title: How to Make History
Day/Time: Friday | 9:30 AM-12:15 PM
Description: In 1963, Martin Luther King, Jr. wrote that “We are made by history,” emphasizing the importance of historical events and narratives in constructing our understanding of the world and ourselves. Many of us might think of History – the academic discipline - as little more than a sequence of objective facts, a chronological list of important names, dates, and battles. In reality, history – as a lived experience – is much more personal and intimate. It is experienced every day, by every individual. Events, from the mundane to momentous, are experienced and remembered by people, recorded by some, and passed along to future generations, hopefully for their edification. This course will focus on how History might shape our identity as residents of the Tampa Bay area, with an emphasis on the process by which History is made, and the role that we might play – as students, researchers, and practitioners – in making history ourselves. In partnership with the St. Pete Beach Public Library, the Gulf Beaches Historical Museum, and the Pinellas Memory project, this Honors Capstone course will provide students with hands-on experience in: recording oral histories, producing documentary photography, digitizing visual and print artifacts, cataloguing and creating a historical archive, and developing an exhibition/program of their work. Our goal will be to digitize and add to the collection of the Gulf Beaches Historical Museum, and to contribute our work to the Pinellas Memory online archive of historical artifacts. This is a service learning course, meaning that we integrate community service with guided reflection into the curriculum to enhance and enrich student learning of course material. PLEASE NOTE:This course is offered mainly off-site: near-weekly travel to the beautiful beaches of Pinellas County is required. Students must provide their own transportation and ensure that they leave enough time in their schedule for travel.

Section: 003
Instructor: Alan Bush
Title: Community Resilience Practicum
Day/Time: Tuesday | 5:00-7:45 PM
Description: What is a Resilience Practicum?A combined seminar course (IDH4950) and internship (IDS3947), focused on urban community resilience. Student will be placed in internships in local municipal departments, non-profits & industry leaders, all focused on resilience. The students and practitioners both will participate in the seminar, familiarizing them with the theory & case study research on urban adaptation for resilience. A key objective of the practicum is Leadership Development, fostering a cohort of students with experience relevant to adaptation & resilience work.
Why take the Resilience Practicum?What we know is this: sea levels are rising from climate change, and this will affect Tampa Bay. And, we know that the social, political & economic impacts of climate change will come ashore before the water. Small changes in sea levels can lead to much larger changes in coastal ecosystems. As those ecological changes translate into infrastructural, economic, political and social forces, they enter the complex web of interrelationships that is Tampa Bay. While there is research and practical knowledge about how the ecology of Tampa Bay will react and respond to climate change, we have a limited understanding of the human dimensions: when, where and how will the economic, technical & cultural elements of Tampa Bay respond to climate change? Given what is at stake in economic & humanitarian terms, Tampa Bay deserves to better understand the landscape of future uncertainties presented by climate change, and to begin building the relationships & knowledge to act. The goal of the resilience practicum is to generate practical knowledge & capacities that will support the development of a resilient Tampa Bay.
How will this work?Interested students should apply here: https://goo.gl/forms/AcntX6cs8kkjrVqG2to the Practicum by March 15 in order to hear by the start of Honors Enrollment. If accepted, they will be given permission to enroll in capstone and internship (and can choose 0-3 credits for internship), and will go through a matching process with partner organizations. Internship & course start in fall 2019 unless otherwise arranged.

Section: 004
Instructor: Michael Cross
Title: Creativity and Innovation
Day/Time: Tuesday | 2:00-4:45 PM
Description: Learn about innovation and creativity directly from world-class innovators. In this capstone experience, you will have the opportunity to hear first-hand experiences about inventions such as lasik-surgery, evidence-based medicine, and low-loss optical fiber. You will work on a culminating project with mentorship by faculty of the Institute for Advance Discovery and innovation.

Section: 005
Instructor: Tamara Nemirovsky
Title: Visual Narratives: Tampa's Stories and Histories
Day/Time: Friday | 9:30 AM-12:15 PM
Description: An exploration of how to produce a short documentary to re-tell the stories of our community in a meaningful and reflective way. Emphasis is on history of the media, documentary/film language, concept development, narrative structures as well as all the production stages (pre-production, production, post-production) and technical aspect required to produce a documentary.

Section: 006
Instructor: Leslie Elsasser
Title: Picture This!
Day/Time: Friday | 9:30 AM -12:15 PM
Description: The artistic lens can provide ways of knowing and a means of understanding everyday realities and the world. In this course, Honors students will train in art exploration and research at USF Contemporary Art Museum with the Andy Warhol Collection. Students will study and explore the wider cultural context from which Andy Warhol emerged, and conduct research based on the photographs, prints and other artworks in the collection. Students will create a final project as a means to explore the artistic process, and as a vehicle for constructing our understanding of culture and of ourselves. This course encourages student engagement with the Warhol Collection in recognition of the arts capacity to foster transferable skills by learning how to research, curate, create meaningful dialogue, self-reflect and think critically within all majors and professional disciplines. The arts are powerful tools with potential to improve tangible skills necessary within emerging interdisciplinary and interprofessional professions, including: visual literacy, mindful reflection, empathy, enhanced perspective, sharpened analytic and diagnostic capabilities, increased tolerance for ambiguity, and improved teamwork and communication. No prior experience with art is required.

Section: 008
Instructor: Kebreab Ghebremichael
Title: Sustainability for Engineers
Day/Time: Friday | 9:30 AM-12:15 PM
Description: The Code of Ethics for Engineers explains how the profession, "has a direct and vital impact on the quality of life for all people." In this course, we will examine the concept of sustainable engineering. We will use systems thinking to explore interdependencies in the three pillars of sustainability (social, economic, and environment), and develop engineering solutions driven by trade-offs between these pillars. We will use case studies to help define what a 'sustainable engineering' project is. This course will then use social science field methods to demonstrate how engineers can develop culturally appropriate projects by engaging community members/organizations throughout a project's lifecycle.

 

Section: 009 

Instructor: Donna Ettel 

Title: Quality makes ¢ent$: Healthcare Research & Quality Outcomes 

Day/Time: M 11:00-1:45 

Description: What ethical and legal obligations do hospitals have to patients? What challenges and issues arise while conducting healthcare quality projects? How are quality of care and cost of delivery related? Using literature (Foucault's The Birth of the Clinic, Gawande's Better: A Surgeon's Notes on Performance, and others) and film (The English Surgeon, Malice, and others), this course purposes to instill the knowledge of community needs through cultural enlightenment, interdisciplinary practices, and real-life experience. This course will primarily focus on clinical outcomes, process change, and emphasizes analysis of the patient care process to identify specific interventions. 

Designed for students interested in interprofessional healthcare delivery, this course seeks to assist students with developing competencies expected of professional programs. Additional topics include an overview of accreditation standards; licensure agencies; reimbursement systems; legal/ethical issues; healthcare computerization; documentation, quality, compliance, and regulatory requirements and HIPPA compliance.

 

IDH 4970 Honors Thesis

Section 001: Thesis I

  • Meets FKL writing intensive or capstone requirements

 

Section 002: Thesis II

  • Meets FKL writing intensive or capstone requirements