Current Students

Summer Courses 2022

The Judy Genshaft Honors College offers courses located on all three USF campuses, as well as off-site locations. Judy Genshaft Honors College courses are open to students from any home campus.

The following course numbers are considered Honors Core classes: IDH 2010, IDH 3350, IDH 3100, IDH 3400, IDH 3600, IDH 4200, IDH 4930 (in some cases), IDH 4950, & IDH 4970.

Location: USF Sarasota-Manatee

IDH 3400: Social Sciences

RBG’s Legacy: Examining Women’s Rights in the Workplace and at Home
IDH 3400-00
Instructor: Bonnie Sylvestri
Summer C
Day/Time: M/W 5-7:15pm
Modality: Hybrid - HB

This class will explore women’s legal rights through the lens of the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg; we will study the legal landscape she bequeathed to women in the United States through discussions on gender inequity, sexual harassment, pregnancy and motherhood discrimination. During the semester, we will explore and dream about the policy changes that could impact the daily lives of women and families. This course will meet in-person on the Sarasota-Manatee one day a week and online through Teams another day of the week. Course meeting details will be outlined in the syllabus.

IDH 4950: Honors Capstone (Permit Required)

Policy-making and Contemporary Governance
IDH 4950-001
Instructor: Belisa Marochi
Summer A
Day/Time: TR- 9:30am-1pm
Modality: In Person - CL 

This class focuses on theoretical and practical debates of policy-making and contemporary governance. Governance refers to the collaborations of state and non-state actors to solve complex local and global issues. Students will investigate and analyze governance processes and analyze the process of policy-making to solve these problems in the contemporary world. Students will learn the policy-making process from agenda-setting, formulation, implementation to evaluation. Students will also learn practical research methods such as interviews, focus groups, non-participant observations and ethnographies.

The lectures, seminars, hands-on activities, and the Capstone project will equip students with a critical understanding of a range of governance issues such as health inequalities, human rights, food security and climate change adaptation.

In collaboration with the Florida Department of Health at Manatee County, this class equips students with research and practical skills to understand real-world complex policy and governance problems. Students will work on Capstone projects in collaboration with local stakeholders from the public, private and civil society organizations in Manatee County. This course will meet in person on the Sarasota-Manatee campus for the first 4 weeks of the term, and online via Teams for the final 2 weeks.

Location: USF St. Petersburg

IDH 3400: Social Sciences

Food and History
IDH 3400-601
Instructor: Gary Mormino
Summer A
T/R | 9:30am – 1:00pm

This class meets in person.

"Tell me what you eat," wrote a French gourmand 200 years ago, "and I will tell you who you are." This class examines history through the lens of food. The way we eat/ate is always changing. We will discuss how invaders, wars, immigrants, ethnic groups, technology, the media and politics change our food habits. Students will maintain food journals and write a mini-term paper.

IDH 4200: Geographical Perspectives

Politics, Literature & Film
IDH 4200-601
Instructor: Thomas Smith
Summer A
T/R | 1:15pm - 2:30pm

This class meets on-line with weekly synchronous sessions.

This class examines global political violence through literature and film. We explore British imperialism and current-day violence in India, the weight of the Holocaust on a survivor’s family, Stalin’s GULAG, the brutality of the Cultural Revolution in China, dystopian sexual totalitarianism, and the personal and political fallout from the Iraq War. Questions to be considered include: What is the relationship between politics and art? How is power wielded responsibly? When is the use of violence justified? Is violence legitimate if done for “reasons of state”? What, if any, personal responsibility do citizens bear for violence committed by their governments? What are the hopes for peaceful conflict resolution?

IDH 4970: Honors Thesis I & II

Honors Thesis
IDH 4970-601
Instructor: Thomas Smith
Summer C 
F | 1:00pm - 2:00pm 

This class will meet on-line and in-person.

St. Petersburg Students in the Judy Genshaft Honors College should register for this section of thesis. Intended only for Thesis I students who plan to graduate in December 2022.

Location: USF Tampa

IDH 3100: Arts and Humanities -- NEW LISTING!

Narrative Medicine and Health In/Justice*
IDH 3100-002 (Medical Humanities)
Instructor: Brianna Cusanno
Summer C
T/R | 9:30 AM - 11:40 AM 

*This course will be offered fully online/synchronous. You must attend the online sessions.

This course integrates two movements within healthcare professional education—narrative medicine and structural competency—to examine health inequities and health justice. Narrative medicine is a framework that suggests humans make sense of health, illness, and medicine through creating and sharing stories. Structural competency is a framework for analyzing and dismantling health inequities. Whether you aim to pursue a career in medicine, policy, social services, public health, or journalism, or if you are entering the conversation as a patient or caregiver, narrative medicine and structural competency can offer you powerful insights into health inequities and health justice. When you practice narrative medicine and structural competency together, you will find yourself able to connect with personal stories of illness without losing sight of the ways individual stories fit within a broader landscape of health in/justice. 

To hone our skills in narrative medicine and structural competency, we will engage with diverse perspectives on health and illness, including through academic texts, short stories, poetry, visual art, radio, podcasts, and more. We will engage our creativity by writing about personal experience, creating art, and sharing stories. And we will mobilize for change through research, artistic expression, and community organizing. 

NEW LISTING!
Community Mural Creation

IDH 3100-003
Instructor: Carolina Miles
Summer B
M/W/F | 9:30 AM – 11:50 AM

This course will meet in person at the AMRoC Fab Lab at the University Mall on Bull Runner Route D.

In this class, students will take a close look at our local community to identify what issues impact some populations the most. Students will examine issues such as healthcare access, immigration, unemployment, and housing, and then work together to design a socially conscious mural to be painted in the community. The collaborative mural will serve as beautification, inspiration, and hope, giving voice to a section of the society that otherwise may remain marginalized and unseen. Students will engage in collaborative work and dialog to create a design that utilizes strong visual literacy, focusing on formal elements and principles of design applications. Class sessions will introduce students to our local community, the history of Murals as an art form, understanding of design strategies, color theory, composition, and working with multiple sources and conceptual ideas. No previous drawing or painting experience is required.

IDH 3400: Social Sciences

Food and History
IDH 3400-001
Instructor: Gary Mormino
Summer B
T/R | 9:30am – 1:00pm

This class meets in-person.

"Tell me what you eat," wrote a French gourmand 200 years ago, "and I will tell you who you are." This class examines history through the lens of food. The way we eat/ate is always changing. We will discuss how invaders, wars, immigrants, ethnic groups, technology, the media and politics change our food habits. Students will maintain food journals and write a mini-term paper.

IDH 4200: Geographical Perspectives -- NEW LISTING!!!

NEW LISTING!!!
The Russian Invasion of Ukraine: Implications for Russia and the World

IDH 4200-001
Instructor: Arman Mahmoudian
Summer A
T/R 1:15 PM - 4:45 PM

This class meets in person.

After the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, many assumed that the world would enter a new era of peace and prosperity under the command of liberal democracies. They assumed that the new Russia would at least play along, if not join, the new global order. However, Russia’s invasion of Georgia in 2008 and the occupation of Crimea in 2014 signaled that the new Russia has no interest in promoting the new international order. Russia’s second invasion of Ukraine in February 2022 proved that Moscow not only has no interest in coexisting with the global status quo, it actually is looking to modify the international order in its favor. In this course, we will learn how the collapse of the Soviet Union shaped today’s Russia as well as Russia’s primary foreign policy objectives. We will endeavor to find out what the Kremlin seeks in waging war against Ukraine, and what could be Russia’s ultimate goal.

Women in Conflicts in the World
IDH 4200-002
Instructor: Raheleh Dayerizadeh
Summer A
M/W/F | 12:00 – 2:20 PM

This class meets in-person.

In overlooking the important roles that women have had during wars and the aftermath, women have been depicted historically, as having no agency and as victims. This course examines major issues concerning international conflicts and peacebuilding, particularly through the eyes of women. It is designed to further student abilities to think critically about international relations and feminist studies to re-explore contemporary questions and debates surrounding conflicts in the world. Among the cases of conflicts to be discussed are Argentina, Algeria, Bosnia, Guatemala, Iraq, Iran, Libya, Pakistan, and Rwanda. The role of women as fighters, survivors, leaders, peacemakers, and activists will be examined. This course will be treated as a seminar, allowing each student to actively participate and facilitate with class discussions, individually present to class, work on group projects, and write a final research paper.

 

UN Sustainable Development Goals and Global Competencies
IDH 4200-003
Instructor: Parandoosh Sadeghinia
Summer B
M/W/F | 12:00 - 2:20 PM

This class meets in-person.

In 2015, all United Nations members shared a blueprint for peace and prosperity for people and the planet with an agenda to achieve specific goals by 2030. This blueprint is known as the 17 Sustainable Development Goals. In this course, students will engage in high impact activities related to each goal. This course is designed to help students critically acknowledge global issues and systematically analyze global challenges, leading them to work towards feasible and sustainable solutions. Students will develop an in-depth understanding of cultural pluralism, efficacy, global centrism, and interconnectedness through the lens of global competency. In addition, they will be encouraged to apply socio- political theories to problem- solving oriented class activities, group projects, and a final paper.

IDH 4950: Honors Capstone (permit required)

Civic Literacy and Current Events
IDH 4950-001
Instructor: Dan Ruth
Summer A
T/R | 9:30 AM – 1:00 PM

This class meets in-person.

This is a class designed to give students an enhanced understanding of world events and civic institutions that influence our lives. Having a better grasp of the swirling news events that occur everyday is essential to becoming a more engaged citizen. To that end, students will be required to read a daily newspaper as well as follow other informational platforms from television, to NPR, so social media. This course will include a weekly news quiz. Students will also participate in weekly team presentations exploring i-depth some aspect of current events and/or various civic institutions. It is said the journalism that goes into reporting the news is, in fact, the first draft of history. The goals of this course are two-fold. First, students will become better informed and thus more aware of stories that form their world view. Second, students will gain a keener appreciation of the journalistic challenges associated with keeping them informed.

This class will also require a Capstone writing project of about, 3,000 words. The topic will be a reflection on how news events over the course of the student's life have served to shape and influence their world view.

 

Quality makes ¢ent$: Healthcare Research & Quality Outcomes
IDH 4950-003 (Medical Humanities)
Instructor: Donna Ettel Gambino
Summer B
T/R | 1:15 PM – 4:45 PM

This class meets in-person.

What ethical and legal obligations do hospitals have to patients? What challenges and issues arise while conducting healthcare quality projects? How are quality of care and cost of delivery related? Using literature (Foucault's The Birth of the Clinic, Gawande's Better: A Surgeon's Notes on Performance, and others) and film (The English Surgeon, Malice, and others), this course purposes to instill the knowledge of community needs through cultural enlightenment, interdisciplinary practices, and real-life experience. This course will primarily focus on clinical outcomes and process change, and will emphasize analysis of the patient care process to identify specific interventions. Students will learn to incorporate the research process as they conduct an actual healthcare outcomes study utilizing a quantitative research approach. Students will be prepared to present findings and practical applications to hospital administrators. Designed for students interested in interprofessional healthcare delivery, this course seeks to assist students with developing competencies expected of professional programs. Additional topics include an overview of accreditation standards; licensure agencies; reimbursement systems; legal/ethical issues; healthcare computerization; documentation, quality, compliance, and regulatory requirements and HIPPA compliance.