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Fall 2021 Honors College Courses

The Judy Genshaft Honors College offers courses located on all three USF campuses, as well as off-site locations. Judy Genshaft Honors College courses are open to students from any home campus.

The following course numbers are considered Honors Core classes: IDH 2010, IDH 3350, IDH 3100, IDH 3400, IDH 3600, IDH 4200, IDH 4930, IDH 4950, & IDH 4970.

Location: USF Sarasota-Manatee campus

IDH 2010: Acquisition of Knowledge

Acquisition of Knowledge
IDH 2010-501

Instructor: Cayla Lanier
T/R | 2:00-3:15 PM

Ranging from classical philosophy to the digital age, this first-year honors course invites students to explore the different ways in which knowledge is created and consumed, how understanding is cultivated, the various relationships possible between knowledge and the self, and the implications of these in our contemporary world. Through an examination of common topics, studio experiences, and assignments, all sections of this course will explore different ways of knowing (e.g., historical, philosophical, scientific, creative, etc.)

IDH 3400: Social Sciences


Social Determinants of Health(care): Access, Utilization, and Disparities
IDH 3400-501
Instructor: Michelle Arnold
T/R | 11:00 AM -12:15 PM

Availability of health insurance is often mistaken for access to healthcare. However, this is a fallacy: Numerous barriers exist which prevent individuals in the US from using needed healthcare, even when they have insurance coverage. Further, social and economic factors at the societal and individual levels often dictate healthcare utilization patterns and perpetuate health disparities. In this course, we will explore various determinants of healthcare access, utilization, and disparities within robust health behavior theoretical frameworks. Using chronic conditions and illnesses common to aging (e.g., Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias; cancer; sensory and mobility loss; Covid-19), we will explore who in the US receives healthcare, what kind, how often, and why (or why not). We will also identify disparities in healthcare utilization and outcomes among vulnerable groups in the US.

Location: USF St. Petersburg campus

IDH 3100: Arts & Humanities

St. Petersburg: City of the Arts
IDH 3100-601
Instructor: Catherine Wilkins
T | 1:00 PM – 3:30 PM

St. Petersburg’s thriving arts scene has made it an international cultural mecca, with our downtown and midtown serving as home to many illustrious museums - including the Dalí, Chihuly, St. Petersburg Museum of Fine Arts, the James Museum, the Florida Holocaust Museum, and the Carter G. Woodson Museum of African-American History. How did St. Pete become a city of the arts? And how do our museums reflect and relate to broader issues in the field of museum studies? This class will feature field trips to the institutions listed above, as well as engage students in discussions about the history of museums in general, and the ways in which politics, colonialism, class, gender, ethnicity, and community all contribute to past and present debates within the field of museum studies. No background knowledge about art is required – this class is a great entry point into art appreciation, and a fun way to get to know your city, too. While transportation to the field trip sites is not provided, all the museums are within walking or biking distance from the USFSP campus – we’ll organize a biking caravan and carpool during the first week of class.

IDH 3400: Social & Behavioral Sciences

Human Rights: The Idea of Our Time
IDH 3400-602
Instructor: Thomas Smith
R | 1:00 PM – 3:30 PM

The late jurist Louis Henkin called human rights "the idea of our time." This seminar explores the philosophical, political, and legal underpinnings of the international human rights regime. We explore the rise of human rights laws and norms in the wake of the Holocaust, the emergence of human rights NGOs and activism, as well as cultural critiques of the universality of rights. Particular modules will focus on human rights today in China, Russia, and Turkey. We will consider classic rights issues such as torture, free assembly, or freedom of the press, as well as more recent developments, such as healthcare, refugee rights, and war crimes. Readings and lectures will be complemented by guest speakers, films, and collaborative projects.

IDH 4000: Major Works/Major Issues

Human Rights: The Idea of Our Time
IDH 4000-601
Instructor: Thomas Smith
R | 1:00 PM – 3:30 PM

The late jurist Louis Henkin called human rights "the idea of our time." This seminar explores the philosophical, political, and legal underpinnings of the international human rights regime. We explore the rise of human rights laws and norms in the wake of the Holocaust, the emergence of human rights NGOs and activism, as well as cultural critiques of the universality of rights. Particular modules will focus on human rights today in China, Russia, and Turkey. We will consider classic rights issues such as torture, free assembly, or freedom of the press, as well as more recent developments, such as healthcare, refugee rights, and war crimes. Readings and lectures will be complemented by guest speakers, films, and collaborative projects.

St. Petersburg: City of the Arts
IDH 4000-602
Instructor: Catherine Wilkins
T | 1:00 PM – 3:30 PM

St. Petersburg’s thriving arts scene has made it an international cultural mecca, with our downtown and midtown serving as home to many illustrious museums - including the Dalí, Chihuly, St. Petersburg Museum of Fine Arts, the James Museum, the Florida Holocaust Museum, and the Carter G. Woodson Museum of African-American History. How did St. Pete become a city of the arts? And how do our museums reflect and relate to broader issues in the field of museum studies? This class will feature field trips to the institutions listed above, as well as engage students in discussions about the history of museums in general, and the ways in which politics, colonialism, class, gender, ethnicity, and community all contribute to past and present debates within the field of museum studies. No background knowledge about art is required – this class is a great entry point into art appreciation, and a fun way to get to know your city, too. While transportation to the field trip sites is not provided, all the museums are within walking or biking distance from the USFSP campus – we’ll organize a biking caravan and carpool during the first week of class.

Literature of Migration, Diaspora, and Exile
IDH 4000-603
Instructor: Tracey Maher
MW | 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM

While migration is as old as humanity, the 20th and 21st centuries have seen an unprecedented amount of human movement across the globe. In this course, we will analyze literary narratives of migration, diaspora, and exile. Students will read a range of texts covering key cases of human displacement across the globe, then focus on the particular case of Arab migration, diaspora, and exile to Europe, America and within the Arab world itself. Our texts will include novels, short stories, and poems, as well as other less obviously literary texts. In addition to the key concepts of migration, diaspora, and exile, we will explore ideas such as home, homeland, nation, travel, émigré, and refugee. As we explore these texts and concepts, we will consider how the experience of human displacement is refracted by factors such as gender, class, religion, race, and historical context. We will consider how past experiences of displacement can shed light on migration, diaspora, and exile in our own historical moment.

IDH 4200: Geographic Perspectives

Literature of Migration, Diaspora, and Exile
IDH 4200-601
Instructor: Tracey Maher
MW | 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM 

While migration is as old as humanity, the 20th and 21st centuries have seen an unprecedented amount of human movement across the globe. In this course, we will analyze literary narratives of migration, diaspora, and exile. Students will read a range of texts covering key cases of human displacement across the globe, then focus on the particular case of Arab migration, diaspora, and exile to Europe, America and within the Arab world itself. Our texts will include novels, short stories, and poems, as well as other less obviously literary texts. In addition to the key concepts of migration, diaspora, and exile, we will explore ideas such as home, homeland, nation, travel, émigré, and refugee. As we explore these texts and concepts, we will consider how the experience of human displacement is refracted by factors such as gender, class, religion, race, and historical context. We will consider how past experiences of displacement can shed light on migration, diaspora, and exile in our own historical moment. 

 

IDH 4970 Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
IDH 4970-601
Instructor: Thomas Smith
F | 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM

St. Petersburg Students in the Judy Genshaft Honors College should register for this section of thesis.

Location: USF Tampa campus

IDH 2010: Acquisition of Knowledge

Ranging from classical philosophy to the digital age, this first-year honors course invites students to explore the different ways in which knowledge is created and consumed, how understanding is cultivated, the various relationships possible between knowledge and the self, and the implications of these in our contemporary world. Through an examination of common topics, studio experiences, and assignments, all sections of this course will explore different ways of knowing (e.g., historical, philosophical, scientific, creative, etc.)

Note: This freshman seminar is intended as an introduction to the Judy Genshaft Honors College community for incoming students. There are many sections of this Honors Core course on the Tampa campus, please work with your Honors advisor to select the time that is best for you.

Special Topics in Honors (These courses are not part of the Honors Core.)

Backstage Pass to Health
IDH 2930-051
Instructor: Tricia Penniecook
F | 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM 

In our currently evolving health care system, there is a growing emphasis on team-based approaches. Such approaches require that health professions training focus on inter professional eduction.  This course provides students who plan to pursue a health profession an opportunity to learn form leaders in their field on what is required to successfully study and then work in health professions as part of inter professional teams.

Bystander Interventions
IDH 2930-052
Instructor: Karim Hanna
M | 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM

“Is there a doctor in the house?” Have you heard this before and wondered - how can I help? This course is designed to give students an introduction to how they can be members of society that are more prepared for stress-inducing, unexpected events. In this course, physicians, medical students and content experts will present on potential life-threatening scenarios to spark discussions about ways to get involved and the ethical implications of participating in emergency relief as people who seek to help and not harm.

Rooted in Place: JGHC Community Garden Service-Learning Course
IDH 2930-054
Instructor: Meg Stowe
T/R | 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM at USF Botanical Gardens
0 credit course that will satisfy the honors service requirement

This experiential learning course explores current knowledge, issues, and innovation in community gardening, including: food security, place-based gardening, community health, and community service and education. Participants in this course earn 50 hours of community service through construction, planting, and harvesting of a community garden located in the USF Botanical Gardens. There are no pre-reqs for this course, and you do not have to have prior gardening experience. Completion of this course will satisfy the community service requirement for the JGHC and result in eligibility for the community service scholarship.

 A note from the instructor: In the Judy Genshaft Honors College, we believe that the full potential of education is realized when classroom learning is paired with experiential learning, often defined as "the process of learning through experience, and more specifically learning through reflection on doing." The ability for students to participate in a diverse offering of this type of education is one of the factors that makes our College special. Service is at the heart of the Judy Genshaft Honors College. Care and concern for others motivates the administration, faculty and staff of the College, but we also seek to model for students how intellectually and professionally rewarding service can be. By participating in building our community garden, you have the potential to create a tight-knit community based on shared values: to contribute to your communities through service, leadership, and global citizenship.

10 of 19 seats are reserved for students in the Honors College Living Learning Community. For a permit to enroll, complete this form.

Global Experience Workshop
IDH 2930-055
Instructor: Reginald Lucien
F |2:00 PM - 3:15 PM

This course is designed to prepare students to understand different perspectives and communicate across cultures. Throughout the semester, students will collaborate on creative projects and engage in meaningful discussions on various global topics. Ultimately, we aim to understand our individual biases as well as to refine our abilities to evaluate and navigate new cultures and perspectives. This course is considered a Global Experience and can count toward the completion of one Honors Global Experience Requirement.

Web App Development
IDH 2930-056
Instructor: Reginald Lucien
R | 3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
0 credit course

Are you interested in learning the basics of programming and building web applications, but have little to no experience? This course invites motivated students to go step-by-step from programming basics to creating web applications through exploration of specifically curated resources. Expert guest lecturers will also join us along the way. In addition to our class time, you’ll need to invest additional work each week to practice skills and prepare projects in teams and individually. You will also need access to your own computer in class and at home. This course is an elective as part of the Honors Nano Incubator Program.

Honors Orchestra
IDH 2930-903
Instructor: Helen Lewis
W | 5:00 PM – 6:15 PM in MUS 119
0 credit course

In the Fall 2021 semester, we will re-start the Judy Genshaft Honors College Orchestra! Enrollment available now. More details available soon.

Internship
IDS 3947-112
Instructor: Lauren Bartshe
Online 0-3 credits

Students who have secured an internship and cannot receive internship credit through their major department may enroll in the honors internship course. This course is designed to help students make the most of their internship experience through guided reflections and support for articulating their experiences for future employers, graduate/professional programs, and personal statements. Students will receive transcript credit for enrolling in this S/U course, and enrollment hours will not count towards excess credit hours. This course does not count towards honors requirements. For more information, contact an honors advisor. Permit required.

IDH 3100: Arts & Humanities

Welcome to the Future: Imagining Tomorrow
IDH 3100-001
Instructor: Pablo Brescia
M/W | 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM 

How has our future been imagined in literature and film? What are the coordinates (life, death, body, soul, science and technology, religion) under which we might examine life on Earth years from now? This course will examine texts and films that interrogate the human condition through the representation of possible futures. We will read short stories (Bradbury, Dick, Borges, Rojo and others) and novels (Bioy Casares, Orwell, Atwood) and we will watch films (Sleep Dealer, 2001: A Space Odyssey, The Matrix, AI, Interstellar) in order to understand the ways in which literature and film have dealt with the anxiety of progress. Possible topics for the class include: the effects of globalization; immigration; labor relations; the body and technology; real and virtual identities; time travel and memory; gender and race within a sy fy context. 

"Gotta Dance": The Greatest Dancers
IDH 3100-002
Instructor: Jeffery Donley
M/W | 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM

The phrase “Gotta Dance” comes from perhaps the greatest movie musical ever made—“Singing in the Rain.” Dancing is movement and movement permeates every aspect of life, whether within our bodies, minds, or the world around us. This class is an interdisciplinary integration of creative and critical methods for researching human movement that introduces the aesthetics and creative processes in dance and choreography. You will think critically about dance performance and you will be engaged on dance as a performing art form by transforming you into the roles of dancer, choreographer, audience member, and critic in relation to the realms of aesthetic questions, politics, identity, religion, complex views of the human body. Students will also cultivate their critical thinking and observational skills in the ways that artists and scholars conceive of human movement as a way of knowing the world.   

Students will watch the greatest dancers perform primarily in dance film musicals, stage/television performances, and music videos. Through guided discussions, they will learn how to observe and analyze the choreography of Busby Berkeley, Jerome Robbins, Michael Kidd, Stanley Donen, Gene Kelly, Robert Alton, and Bob Fosse, for their contributions of avant-garde films of the postwar period, translations of stage choreography to screen, architectural studies, cartoon animation, music videos. 

 Drawing on eclectic source materials from different dance genres, the focus of this class will be an examination and observation of dance in film from c. 1928 to the present, including the performances of male dancers Fred Astaire, Gene Kelly, The Nicholas Brothers, Donald O’Connor, John Brasica, Mikhail Baryshnikov, Michael Jackson, and MC Hammer. Female dancers Eleanor Powell, Ginger Rogers, Cyd Charisse, Leslie Caron, Vera-Ellen, Mitzi Gaynor, Ann Miller, and Natalia Osipova will be analyzed. No prior dance experience necessary. 

Rocking the Dead Sea Scrolls
IDH 3100-003
Instructor: Jeffery Donley
M/W | 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM

In March 1947, a young Bedouin goat herder followed two of his wandering goats into the cliffs along the northwestern shore of the Dead Sea. After one of the goats entered an opening in the rocks, Muhammad picked up a rock and tossed it through a second opening. Hearing the sound of breaking pottery, he entered the cave and found scrolls wrapped in linen clothe inside clay jars. Young Muhammad literally “rocked” the Dead Sea Scrolls!

The Dead Sea Scrolls have been hailed as the greatest, most important, and dramatic discoveries of the 20th century. In this course students will explore the discovery of around 1000 ancient manuscripts (dating from the third century BC to the first century AD) in eleven caves on the northwestern shore of the Dead Sea. The content of this multi-media course is an interdisciplinary approach that integrates literature, history, language, sociology, archeology, films, published articles, and special research conducted by your professor and from Dr. Norman Golb, one of the leading experts in the field.

Students will make a detailed study of aspects of the Hebrew Bible or Old Testament, sectarianism in the Second Temple Judaism, the archaeological site of Khirbet Qumran, Biblical texts from the eleven caves, the Copper Scroll, relationship to the beginnings of Christianity, and its laws in comparison to contemporary Jewish Halakhah. All readings are in English.  

The Scripted Self
IDH 3100-004
Instructor: Elizabeth Kicak
M/W | 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM

Who are you? Are you the same “you” to your parents? Your friends? Your employer? A stranger in the grocery store? Can anyone know “you” the same way you know yourself? These are some of the big questions explored in “The Scripted Self.” This course is centered on the idea that who we are is an act of creation, a role that we are constantly developing and performing for others. The class will explore how we construct different selves as well as how we consciously and unconsciously respond and adapt to the different audiences we encounter. Students will analyze their own unique scripts through creative non-fiction, interviews, social media posts, and other common methods of expression in order to develop a deeper understanding of their identities—where they take their cues from, how they adjust to their audience, and the potential consequences of those changes. This class relies on imagination, creative writing, active reading, and philosophical inquiry. Special attention will be given to the role of cultural practices and expectations as well as developing the rhetorical skills commonly used in written, visual, and digital media.

Creators, Images and Sounds
IDH 3100-005
Instructor: Tamara Nemirovsky
F | 12:30 PM – 3:15 PM

In this class, students will learn how to produce a video art that reflects the understanding of current events and their own response to them through the creation of a fictional narrative.

They will become creators of images and sounds that capture their own subjective interpretation of problems that local communities are facing today.

This class will focus on concept development, image, and sound composition, research, storyboarding, film language, and construction of meaning through the creation of multiple visual layers and sounds during filming and editing as well as all technical aspects (camera, lighting, sound, editing software) required to produce a creative video.

Students will collectively explore the aesthetic and rhythmic qualities of images and sounds to evoke emotions and meanings in the viewer. They will research human-social problems (violence, guns, education, poverty, climate change, addictions, communication, etc.) affecting communities today and develop a video art piece that will question at the same time the audience’s and their own systems of beliefs. Students will develop their capacity to recognize how we create understanding through the production of a video step by step, and how creative and fictional work can address their current social and cultural concerns. This course does not require previous film/art knowledge or experience. You will use a DLSR camera

Stop-Motion Animation
IDH 3100-006
Instructor: Tamara Nemirovsky
M | 2:00 PM – 4:45 PM 

In this course, students will create socially conscious stop-motion animation artwork. Students will explore textural imagery and conceptual animation filmmaking by developing their own creative research projects. Projects will examine community issues while incorporating multiple perspectives into production decisions when creating a meaningful and reflective stop-motion animation film. Students will collectively explore the cultural value, story, and emotional meaning of objects, materials, elements, and sounds to evoke emotions and meaning in the viewer by creating socially conscious stop-motion animation artwork.

Emphasis is on animation film language, experimental stop-motion animation techniques, concept development, and narrative structures as well as all the production stages (pre-production, production, post-production) and technical aspect required to produce a stop motion animation film. This course does not require previous animation knowledge or experience. 

Ecopoetry and Environmental Writing
IDH 3100-007
Instructor: Derek Robbins
T/R | 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM

The poet John Shoptaw defines an “ecopoem” as a poem that is both environmental and environmentalist. The former criterion has to do with content. Ecopoetry has for its subject some element of the natural world—whitebark pine, Steller’s jay, but also the ordinary black bug on your windowsill, the palm frond blowing across the Wendy’s parking lot. In this respect, ecopoetry overlaps with nature poetry. However, Shoptaw’s second criterion pushes beyond mere nature poetry by insisting that the ecopoem take an “environmentalist” orientation to the natural world. We’ll examine both criteria in this course. First, we’ll look deeper at nature poetry, paying attention to the work of diverse poets over the past century. How might writers of color, for example, complicate our views of nature poetry? What instances of proto-environmentalism might we find in nature poetry of the past? How does contemporary nature poetry seek to re-envision or recreate our relationship to environment? Second, we’ll ask ourselves what does it mean for a poem to be “environmentalist”? How might poetry respond to the environmental crises of our time? We’ll ground our study of poetry in contemporary ecocriticism and examine common environmental tropes such as pastoral, wilderness, and apocalypse.

Students will use their understanding of ecopoetry, gleaned through careful analysis, to write their own ecopoems. We will study the genre of poetry, learning its formal structures and various means of meaning-making from poetic line to image to metaphor. We’ll use this study for our own creative practice, completing a series of ecopoems that will be collected in a final portfolio and selected for a class anthology of ecopoetry.

Narrative Cartography
IDH 3100-008
Instructor: Ulluminair Salim
M/W | 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM

“You can kiss your family and friends goodbye and put miles between you, but at the same time you carry them with you in your heart, your mind, your stomach; because you do not just live in a world but a world lives in you.” —Frederick Buechner, Author and Theologian

Cartography is the study and practice of map-making, and Narrative Cartography invites students to map the stories of their lives, challenging traditional notions of space, place, and structure. Through reading, writing, and multilayered forms of journeying, students will examine manifold ways to tell stories that matter, from the mundane to the profound. This practice-oriented course leverages both written narrative and traditional and contemporary cartographic methods to visit personal places seldom explored.

Travel Writing & Literature
IDH 3100-009
Instructor: Deepak Singh
M/W | 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM

In this course, students will explore the prose genre of travel writing. They will closely read current and traditional short pieces, essays, and books and analyze them like writers. They will write essays and stories inspired by the readings, and/or their own travels. This course is especially suited to students who have studied abroad, plan to study abroad, or have experience as an international student; however, such experience or plans are not required. This course will give students the opportunity to engage with a variety of views of the world through the accounts of travelers from a variety of cultural and historical lenses. In the process, students will write a story of their own—fiction, non-fiction, or another genre—centering on the transformative potential of travel.

Deconstructing Disney World: Interpreting the Politics, Popularity, and Perceptions of Orlando’s Playground
IDH 3100.010
Instructor: Kevin Yee
M/W | 8:00 AM - 9:15 AM

This is an interdisciplinary honors seminar investigating Walt Disney World in myriad ways you've never thought about before. Why is it so popular? What does it tap into? Which audiences does it exclude, and why? What do the individual rides MEAN if you drill down to investigate them critically, using the tools of cultural analysis? Why does Disney make the decisions it does regarding its theme parks? In the course of learning much about the facts behind Disney parks (through readings and videos), you will also gain the skills necessary to analyze them. You will leave this experience with a fabulously rich tapestry of overlapping viewpoints on this complex cultural symbol that everyone seems to know superficially, but one which few actually take the time to reflect upon. It may "ruin" the magic to some extent (and that is intentional), but ideally it should also open up completely unseen avenues of consideration at the same time, and thus enhance your appreciation of it.

Walt Disney World markets itself as a place to escape reality. We will use the tools of cultural analysis to explore how, and why, the fantasy works, by looking at everything from Disney’s marketing messages right down to individual rides. Our investigation will be wide-ranging. Expect to be challenged in such disparate fields as critical theory, cultural studies, gender studies, film studies, architecture, finance & accounting, local government, marketing, advertising, and history. Your ability to juggle, sift, and prioritize such differing viewpoints at the same time will provide evidence, which can be otherwise elusive, of your capacity to perform "critical thinking" when problem-solving or approaching unfamiliar situations. Through these investigations, we will situate Disney World in today’s complex larger world, with an eye toward understanding it as a cultural touchstone and part of the fabric of international relations.

IDH 3350: Natural Sciences

Interdisciplinary Research in Science: The Laboratory of Life
IDH 3350-001
Instructor: Michael Cross
T/R | 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM 

Natural science is the basis for many applied disciplines including medicine, public health, and engineering. In this course, we look beyond the STEM core, to incorporate other areas of inquiry necessary to advance the human condition. Using the lens of the UN Sustainable Development Goals (UNSDG), we foster interdisciplinary inquiry to address specific opportunities within the local community in collaboration with a non-profit partner. Examples of previous projects include UNSDG (3) Good Health and Well-being to understand how assisted living facilities can better navigate the COVID-19 global pandemic and UNSDG (8) Decent Work and Economic Growth to support programs that engage K-12 in STEM education. Finally, we address your future aspirations in a series of assignments to help you navigate your next, whether that is graduate school, medical school, law school, or entry into the workforce. 

Science Fiction – Science Fact
IDH 3350-002
Instructor: Kevin Mackay
F | 9:30 AM – 12:15 PM 

Science Fiction – Science Fact is a seminar style course exploring facts and fiction in the astronomy media.  We will explore a selection of science fiction movies and novels along with Art and popular culture which has an astronomy basis, and we will critique the ideas presented.  Students will explore what is fact, what is feasible and what is pure fiction and will have the opportunity to express their learning via a class project which may have a scientific or artistic emphasis.

Cli-Fi: Climate Fiction and Climate Change 
IDH 3350-003
Instructor: Andrew Hargrove
T/R | 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM

 Climate fiction is a new and exciting genre of media that has emerged as the science on climate change has become clearer and more widely accepted. In this seminar course, we will explore the facts and fiction of climate change through books, graphic novels, movies, art, and video games. Can these tools be used for educating people on the dangers and realities of climate change or are they merely entertainment? Should media that tackles climate change issues be held to a higher bar than their less critical counterparts? What are the global-political implications of a new genre of media that warns of real impending disaster? We will explore these questions and many more in this exploration of Cli-Fi! 

Microbes and Your Immune System
IDH 3350-004
Instructor: Steve Specter
T/R | 8:00 AM – 9:15 AM

This section will mainly cover general principles of microbiology and immunology with an emphasis on how microbes and humans interact.  This will provide insights into infectious diseases and public health topics.  There will be an opportunity to exam current topics in microbiology via current events sessions.  There will also be some eclectic sessions on other topics, such as evolutionary biology and gene editing.  There is ma strong focus on active learning, so that only a few introductory lectures will be given with discussions on reading materials featured in most classes.  Students will also be afforded the opportunity to look into a few topics in greater depth in order to prepare written and oral presentations.

IDH 3400: Social Sciences

100 Days of Discover: Cultivating Your Curiosity and Finding Relevance
IDH 3400-001
Instructor: Francesca Arnone-Lewis
M/W | 8:00 AM – 9:15 AM 

“Life is your art.
An open, aware heart is your camera.
A oneness with your world is your film.” - Ansel Adams 

While facing the demands and routines of a degree program, you may not necessarily cultivate opportunities nurturing your awareness of the journey as much as your progress toward graduation. Drawing cultural, societal, and community connections aligned with their plan of study, this course affords each student the chance to construct a unique and personally meaningful 100 Days Project connecting their curiosities and passions to aspects of their desired degree outcomes. Coursework emphasizes continuous reflection on the process, encouraging students to investigate new directions and possibilities as their projects transform over the semester. 

Community & Citizenship
IDH 3400-002
Instructor: Cody Hawley
T/R | 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM 

The concept of “community” is foundational to our inherited understanding of what constitutes good citizenship within a democratic society. But what exactly is community, and what role does it play in an era characterized by individualism, mass culture, government interventionism, and global capitalism?

 This course will examine the contested nature of community by exploring both its historic role as an anchor of democratic citizenship and its contemporary manifestations in the twenty-first century. We will employ an interdisciplinary perspective that takes the best work in communication, sociology, economics, political philosophy, law, religion, and history to explore key issues pertaining to the formation and resilience of civic communities. Major themes to be discussed will include volunteerism, family, regionalism, rights and obligations, public spheres, inclusion/exclusion, nationalism and cosmopolitanism. The goal of this course is not to come to concrete answers, but to develop a critical and appreciative perspective of the role community plays in forming social order and identities of self. Success in this course will mean a generative understanding of theory that translates into the real-life practice of community-building.

Music Mania: The Psychology of Music
IDH 3400-003
M/W | 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM 
IDH 3400-004
M/W | 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Instructor: Jeffery Donley

In this course, students will listen to and ENJOY all genres of music. It will explore the scientific understanding of all psychological aspects of music. These include studies on listening, performing, creating, memorizing, analyzing, describing, learning, and teaching, as well as applied social developmental. Students will listen to/experience/and enjoy different genres of 18th – 21st century music for analysis such as:  Classical, Opera, Theater Lyricist and Librettist, Blues, Vocal, Movie Musicals, Easy Listening, Country, Electronic, Folk, Hip-hop, Jazz, Christian, Metal, Disco, Latin, New Age, Punk, Reggae, Rock n Roll, and Rap. 

The psychology of music is a two-way street. First, music experience gives us access to certain features of the world, but in experiencing these things we ourselves are modified by them. Second, musical experiences “make an impression” on us, quite literally, by altering the neural connections in our brains and interacts with creativity (composition, improvisation), performance (reproduction, movement), and reception (listening and interpretation).

This course will expose students to cutting-edge “music as psychology” techniques and theories of psychophysics, cognitive psychology, psychophysiology, particle physics/super string theory, cognitive neuroscience, and music theory & analysis. The concept of the student as “listener” is thematic to our course, and inherently rich and diversified in its definition and application. Students will learn the factors of music listening: 1) to regulate arousal and mood, 2) to achieve self-awareness, and 3) as an expression of social relatedness. Students will learn not to just hear at a subconscious level, but to choose to listen by paying attention to the sound and register the meaning at a conscious level—thus focusing on sounds and using one’s mind to interpret their social and cultural meanings.

Global Health with People First
IDH 3400-005
[This course is certified as part of the Medical Humanities in a Global Context (MHGC) pathway; it is open to all Honors students]
Instructor: Holly Donahue Singh
T/R | 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM

This course introduces students to the general principles and foundations of public health using a global framework and giving particular emphasis to qualitative and mixed methods health research. This approach centers the experiences and perspectives of people who comprise health systems, experience health systems, and face the consequences of policy. It introduces students to the social and behavioral sciences through cultural and sociopolitical inquiry and aims to cultivate ethical ideas and practices pertaining to civic engagement, dimensions of human experience, and the complexity of social interaction. 

What is the Environment? Philosophy, Society, Culture, and Meaning-Making in the Development of the Environment 
IDH 3400-006
Instructor: Andrew Hargrove
T/R | 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM

You may think the answer to this question is simple, but this seminar style course will critically explore the way the social construction of the environment has changed through history and how our conception of what the environment is affects how we treat it and what we determine is acceptable. In this course, we will take a global perspective on how the environment is perceived around the world, what we are doing about solving the many environmental problems globally, and how a shift in perspective can spark change. We will explore the environment from philosophical, sociological, psychological, and environmental science perspectives and discuss how such a simple concept is actually quite complex.  

Emotions: Experience, Expression, and Understanding
IDH 3400-007
Instructor: Lisa Spinazola
T/R | 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM

What accounts for the differences in how we understand and experience emotions like guilt, love, shame, joy, gratitude, regret, hope, or anger? Knowledge and expression of emotions are impacted by how we are raised, culture, gender, personalities, style of interaction, and current life stressors. We will extend our understanding of emotions through various lenses and disciplines: psychology, sociology, biology, communication, and/or social construction. Cognitive Behavioral therapy posits if we change our ways of thinking, we can impact the emotions we feel, and ultimately change behaviors that cause disruption and distress in our lives. Can it be this simple? Paul Ekman studies the universality of emotions, physiological responses to (and causes of) basic or foundational emotional states, as well as the importance of displaying and expressing emotions to the formation and maintenance of interpersonal relationships. Deborah Tannen writes about the origins of, problems that arise, and ways to better understand the gendered language of emotions. Combining photography and electronic journaling, we’ll add texture and visuals to the expression of emotional states we’ll discuss over the course of the semester. For the final project, students will choose a relationship (and its various emotions) or an emotion (through various relationships) to write about and reflect upon to demonstrate how their understanding of emotions has changed and/or developed over the course of the semester.

Experimental Travel – Tampa Bay
IDH 3400-008
Instructor: Colin Whitworth
F | 9:30 AM – 12:15 PM 

“The pleasure we derive from journeys is perhaps dependent more on the mindset with which we travel than on the destination we travel to.” 
― Alain de Botton, The Art of Travel 

 To walk, to travel, and to move are embodied practices that engage us in a variety of ways of thinking and being. This class asks us to engage in travel in and around the Tampa Bay area as a way of experiencing and interrogating tourist practices as a mode of performance, as an engagement with space and place, and as a practice to critically reflect upon ourselves and our cultural identities. Working with a variety of methods—ethnography, poetic inquiry, performance, and more—students will use local travel as the genesis for written, performed, and artistic works. Regular classroom meetings and occasional individual or group trips to local destinations are required for this class. Students should be prepared to document our travel through writing, audio/video recording, and photography—using phones, cameras, notebooks, and other technologies they may have access to. By attending to de Botton’s view that “tourism is a view of the world,” we will work to question our own views through a deep and embodied engagement with the places and spaces of Tampa Bay.

Please note: Some class meetings will be held off-campus; transportation will not be provided. Off-campus meetings will be held during regular class hours. Students must provide their own transportation and ensure that they leave enough time in their schedule for travel to and from off-site locations.  

Women and Leadership Discourse
IDH 3400-009
Instructor: Amaly Santiago
M/W | 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM

What do organizations communicate to professional women? How are women advised to be leaders in organizational settings? How should a leader be? This seminar aims to cultivate the understanding of leadership by exploring women’s leadership discourse and the asymmetries in the workplace that dictate women’s career advancement. We will explore how organizational practices construct leadership discourse and how leaders are made in organizations. This course will engage in leadership issues through readings, organizational practices, case studies, and interactive projects.

 

IDH 3600: Seminar in Applied Ethics

Biomedical Ethics
[This course is certified as part of the Medical Humanities in a Global Context (MHGC) pathway; it is open to all Honors students]
Instructor: John Dormois
IDH 3600-001
T/R | 8:00 AM – 9:15 AM
IDH 3600-002
T/R | 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM (this section restricted to 7-year BS/MD students; contact Mr. Mejias)

This course uses a case-based approach to explore a number of ethical dilemmas that occur in medicine. Students will participate in groups of 3 to prepare class presentations, write summaries on those presentations, and write a 10-page research paper on a medical topic with ethical implications. Class discussions are an important part of the overall experience.

Ethics at the End of Life
IDH 3600-003
[This course is certified as part of the Medical Humanities in a Global Context (MHGC) pathway; it is open to all Honors students]
Instructor: Lindy Davidson
M/W | 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM 

Death is a taboo topic in American culture, in spite of the 100% chance that every human will eventually experience it. This aversion to serious consideration and conversation regarding death, even among physicians, results in a lack of preparation for many people at the end of life. In this course in applied ethics, we will examine the intersection of medical ethics and end-of-life care. We will look at the history of ethics and decision-making by examining notable cases from U.S. history; consider multiple end-of-life contexts including pediatric illness, cultural perspectives, the impact of religion, and institutional influences; and examine the tools used by healthcare professionals to address ethics at the end of life. This interactive course will engage students by using creative arts activities, reading responses, and perspective taking. The course will culminate in students producing a creative or educational project for patients, families, students and/or practitioners that relates to end-of-life.

Controversies in Medical Research
IDH 3600-004
Instructor: David Diamond
M | 2:00 PM – 4:45 PM

In this seminar we will investigate flaws, conflicts of interest, outright deception and breaches of ethics in medical research. This will be an active learning course in which students will study the literature in specific topics, and then summarize the research in an engaging discussion with the class through the use of a PowerPoint presentation. 

Ethics of Visual Rhetoric
IDH 3600-005
Instructor: Meredith Johnson
M/W | 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM 

For over 2,000 years, the art of rhetoric has equipped speakers and writers for public participation. Visual rhetorics, ranging from political yard signs to protest posters to Instagram posts, are an important part of public participation. In this class, we consider visual rhetorics as: 

  • a means to solve communication problems. How can designed texts use color, typography, illustrations, layout, and media to achieve rhetorical goals? Which design practices are the most inclusive, producing accessible texts that allow all our users to achieve their goals?
  • agents of knowledge making, action, or change. How do the designed aspects of documents shape what we are able, allowed, or made to see? How do visual rhetorics influence decisions about what counts as a public problem and which problems are significant? How do visual rhetorics invite (new) behaviors and attitudes? 

Students read and analyze theories of visual rhetoric that are based on research in behavioral economics, communication, human-computer interaction, persuasion, design, and more as they study and produce ethical visual texts. “Visual text” is broadly construed here to include emoji, pie charts, buildings, patient education brochures, shampoo bottles, video games, photographs, and so on. We’ll examine these texts to better understand how visuals act rhetorically, promote equity, and disrupt privilege. 

Moral Machines?: The Social Impacts of Artificial Intelligence
IDH 3600-006
Instructor: Ora Tanner
T/R |9:30 AM – 10:45 AM 

This course provides an introduction to artificial intelligence and its social, political, economical, environmental, and cultural impacts. Topics such as racist bots, sexist algorithms, and biased societal outcomes due to the unethical design, development, and deployment of artificial intelligence (AI) systems will be discussed.  Students will be challenged to interrogate assumptions about AI as a supposedly “neutral” and “objective” technology through an exploration of interactive case studies in healthcare, criminal justice system, computer science, environmental science, the arts, education, religion, journalism, future workforce, and more. Using a multidisciplinary ""reading"" list that includes playing digital games, exploring AI tools, and engaging with multimedia content, students will be introduced to critical scholarship that examines the intersection of ethics and technology. Students will demonstrate their newly developed perspectives about AI through a social impact project that addresses an ethical question about the application of AI in a particular area. No coding or programming required. All majors welcome. 

The Ethics of Political Grievances, Freedom, and the Response to Tyranny
IDH 3600-007
Instructor: Stephanie Williams
M | 5:00 PM – 7:45 PM 

This course will examine the questions surrounding the concepts of political grievances, freedom, and tyranny through the study of conservative, and centrist political speeches.  These readings include politicians and political activists from the Revolutionary War and the founding of America through the Biden Administration.  Students will discuss what it means to express and hold political grievances and debate of what a ""just"" society must look like. The class will also look at the issue of ethics through their arguments related to political freedom from the right to vote, the right to be free from political violence, the right to determine which citizens have “the right to rise,” may make demands of our political systems through protest, and make changes to government policies and institutions that don’t serve their political interests, and make demands to preserve tradition and culture.  By the conclusion of the course, students will improve their skills in political discourse by learning how to research and articulate the major topics that shape our national values.  The professor ensures that the students are engaged in productive conversations that are civil and fair by allowing students of all political views to be heard in class in a respectful environment. 

For the Good of the Community
IDH 3600-008 
Instructor: Michael Tkacik
M/W | 8:00 AM – 9:15 AM

Why do people serve others? As an educated person in a democratic society, do you have an obligation to serve others? What is community? What role do communities play in communicating values, providing meaning and shaping the character of its members? What factors contribute to, challenge and threaten communities and communal membership? How do diversity and plurality edify communal experiences, and how are some marginalized from communities due to race/ethnicity; social class; sexual orientation; etc.? What principles can serve as foundational for service and decision-making which might transform communities and facilitate the common good?

 Informed by the mission and values of the Judy Genshaft Honors College which espouses experiential learning and community service, this course will provide students the opportunity to examine ethical foundations of service and community and learn to view social, economic, political and religious aspects of community and community organization from various perspectives. Participation in a community service project of the student’s choosing is required, for this course is committed to community-engaged service-learning pedagogy. Service-learning entails critical reflection on praxis. Consequently, the expectation is that students will honor their service commitment, share their experience with the class, and deliberately reflect upon their service in conversation with course readings. Serving others can be perspective-altering and life-transforming.

Please Note: Students in the course will be expected to engage in community service for 2-3 hours a week over the course of the semester. Suggestions for local non-profit organizations, some within the USF Tampa campus neighborhood, will be provided to assist students. ​​​​​Out of respect to community partners and those served, honoring one’s service commitment is an essential part of the course.

 

IDH 4200: Geographical Perspectives

Post World War II History and the Evolution of Television
IDH 4200-001
Instructor: Dan Ruth
R | 8:00 AM – 10:45 AM 

This class explores post-World War II history as seen through the camera's lens. Students will follow and explore many pivotal moments from the early 1950s through the present day and how they were covered, first by the earliest days of television to the explosion of present day technology and advanced social media. This course will discuss the Army/McCarthy Hearings, the Kennedy/Nixon debates, the Kennedy assassination, Vietnam, the Civil Rights movement, the Iraq wars, presidential scandals, the Iranian hostage crisis, as well as Brexit and how each of these historic moments not only were viewed through the lens, but how the camera influenced the public's understanding of them.

Beasts and Burdens: Survival, Imagination, and Risk in the (Global) South
IDH 4200-002
[This course is certified as part of the Medical Humanities in a Global Context (MHGC) pathway; it is open to all Honors students]
Instructor: Ulluminair Salim
T | 8:00 AM – 10:45 AM

""Can the subaltern speak?"" --Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak 

Beasts and Burdens: Survival, Imagination, and the Politics of Risk in the (Global) South will investigate health (inequality) and risk through the artistic lens of women and children in southern, postcolonial spaces, examining their critical, creative, and unconventional responses to subjugation.  Through thematic and geographic “travels,” students will examine axes of inequality, subalternity, and survival across the globe.  Beasts and Burdens will leverage audio, video, imagery, and narrative as windows into the social imaginary. 

Guiding Questions

How can students and scholars of the (global) south envision alternative narratives and intervene upon existing characterizations? That is, what are elsewheres and elsewhens of representing power and agency in southern spaces? Finally, what are ways in which we can critically theorize gender inequality, health, and resilience in risky spaces?  How can we map them and map onto them? As such, the study of (gendered) violence, power, and socioeconomic and environmental conflict are central to the issues that this course seeks to examine. 

While the course privileges the stories and lived experiences of women and children of the (global) south, it welcomes students of all gender identities.

Cultural Identity and Social Class
IDH 4200-003
Instructor: Linda Tavernier-Almada
M/W | 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM

The fight for social capital within social class structures can be brutal if the group trying to achieve the desired social status is culturally different from the dominant group. In turn, the exclusion of a group from standard avenues of social mobility can create such devastating consequences for the marginalized group that it creates and foments a counterculture. Using readings from various fields of study and select films from around the world, we will look at the struggles for sociocultural status taking place across the globe. Through an interdisciplinary lens, we will look at groups like the street children of Brazil, the Untouchables of India, the teenage Muslims in France, the woman of Afghanistan, etc. Our goal will be to advance solutions for some of the real-world problems that we discover during the semester. 

Cultures of the World: Globalization and Cultural Pluralism
IDH 4200-004
Instructor: Linda Tavernier-Almada
M/W | 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM 

Around the globe, traditional cultural beliefs guide much of human behavior. Various aspects of traditional cultural beliefs and norms inform the everyday decisions of average citizens, world leaders, CEOs, and other people of influence. The impact that traditional beliefs have on the behavior of people across the globe is often not understood by most Americans. Typically, aside from the superficial information that they get from their TVs or short tourist trips, most Americans are completely unfamiliar with the fundamental cultural concepts that guide the behaviors of people in other countries. Yet, because we now live in a global society, it is crucial that we understand which cultural traditions and beliefs are motivating the people in the communities and markets that are intertwined around globe. In this course, students will become cultural pluralists by developing the skill sets needed to identify a broad range of international cultural norms and beliefs and navigating through an increasingly pluralistic global workforce.

Health and History
IDH 4200-005
[This course is certified as part of the Medical Humanities in a Global Context (MHGC) pathway; it is open to all Honors students]
Instructor: Andrea Vianello
T/R | 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM 

Health care has for centuries been a major concern of societies around the globe. From shamanism, the rituals of ancient Mesopotamia, the medical texts of ancient Egypt, the insights on Roman medicine provided by Pompeii and the epidemics and pandemics that have been recorded since the Middle Ages, to the beginnings of scientific medicine, the history of health care provides an exciting perspective with lessons valid even today. The role of the physician in societies, ethical issues, and the effects of epidemics on people and societies are the key themes covered.

Using a scientific approach within archaeology and history, the course will present an innovative and up-to-date history of the world focusing on health. The course will emphasize a transdisciplinary deep history and evolutionary approach towards pathogens. The course stems from a research project based in Venice, Italy, on the first quarantine in the world, trying to reconstruct the epidemics and pandemics of the last 600 years. Upon completion of the course, students in any discipline will be better equipped to understand and contend with health care and public health challenges.

Arab Literature, Culture & Film
IDH 4200-006
Instructor: Raja Benchekroun
T/R | 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM 

Arab Literature, Culture and Film is a gateway to the Arab World based on scholarly research, authentic voices, textual, translated resources, media, and literature by authors of Arab origins. The course will introduce students to the variety of languages, dialects and cultures in the region which comprise a kaleidoscopic wealth of the world’s most ancient societies, and major past/ current events that transformed the Arab region.

A New Global Struggle: The Return of Cold War
IDH 4200-007
Instructor: Arman Mahmoudian
M/W | 9:30 AM – 10:45 PM

In this course, students will primarily review the history of the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union with a focus on their proxy wars in Yemen, Vietnam and Korea and also their Intelligence/espionage conflicts. Then, students will study the Russia-US relations in the Post Cold War Era with focus on how war in Bosnia changed the paradigm in the US-Russia relation. Finally, students will learn about how the US-Russia proxy conflicts in Syria, Ukraine and Libya and their escalating espionage/Intelligence rivalry which caused the emergence of the new Cold War.

International Security: Why do states behave the way they do?
IDH 4200-008
Instructor: Arman Mahmoudian
M/W | 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM 

The goal of this course is to help students understand states’ behavior and why they act in the way that they do. Thus, through this course students will learn about theoretical, conceptual frameworks regarding interstate relations and why states sometimes choose to compete rather than cooperate.

 This course contains four stages: 1) students will learn about the concept of international security. 2) students will study theories which help them to understand states’ behaviors. 3) students will learn about potential solutions to the instability. 4) students will examine case studies which help them to apply what they have learned to practical situations. 

Cultural Identity and Social Class
IDH 4200-009
Instructor: Linda Tavernier-Almada
M/W | 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM 

The fight for social capital within social class structures can be brutal if the group trying to achieve the desired social status is culturally different from the dominant group. In turn, the exclusion of a group from standard avenues of social mobility can create such devastating consequences for the marginalized group that it creates and foments a counterculture. Using readings from various fields of study and select films from around the world, we will look at the struggles for sociocultural status taking place across the globe. Through an interdisciplinary lens, we will look at groups like the street children of Brazil, the Untouchables of India, the teenage Muslims in France, the woman of Afghanistan, etc. Our goal will be to advance solutions for some of the real-world problems that we discover during the semester.

Access to Justice
IDH 4200-010
Instructor: Alma Dedic Sarenkapa
T/R | 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM 

People need protection from possible harm inflicted on them. All of us can find ourselves in harmful situations, especially when we engage in disputes or conflicts of interest. In these situations, we start looking into actions or remedies we can use to redress the harm. When remedies are guaranteed by law, they are called legal remedies. Legal remedies involving a third party such as a legal institution lead to resolving disputes mostly through compensation or restitution. The ability of people to access and seek remedies through different mechanisms is the main concern of the Access to Justice concept. In this course, we will look into this concept and its relationship to social justice. This relationship can be examined from different perspectives such as equal or unequal opportunities, privileges, and economic justice. We will also study different models of access to justice and human rights standards that are linked to them, in particular as seen through the lens of recent events around the world – how did they shape access to justice and human rights in general? We will look at the global perspective of human rights implementation and subsequent influence on access to justice in the Americas, Europe & Asia, and Africa. Students will have the opportunity to learn about human rights protection in the country and around the world through specific case studies, facilitated discussions, and workshops.

Contemporary Middle East: Political Challenges in a Global Age
IDH 4200-011
Instructor: Nazek Jawad
T/R | 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM

Recently, the Middle East is conceived as a region that breeds fundamentalism and an area of long-lasting conflicts. Due to the distorted notions and misrepresentations of the Middle East circulated and promoted in corporate media, and in conventional media outlets as well, this course is set into a great mission. This course aims to provide students with an authentic understanding of the diversified multi-layered facets of the Middle East, and to expose them to the breadth of Middle Eastern cultures, and their political and cultural landmarks within historical and contemporary contexts. This course discusses the main social, economic, and political developments in the Middle East from the 19th century onward. Topics to be covered include, but are not limited to: colonial legacies; Islamic Sharia Laws, identity politics, social movements, Arab uprisings, women and politics in the Middle East, terrorism, and development. Additionally, this course also highlights the Middle East’s abundant culture, and introduces students to countless contributions of Middle East countries to human civilizations in a wide range of areas, including science, arts, architecture, and music. The aim of this course is to broaden students' intellectual perspective by introducing them to the geography, history, politics, political economy, culture, and arts of the Middle East. Another equally important goal of this course is to impart appreciation of other cultures by introducing students to the diversified cultures of the Middle East.

Culture and (Post)Colonialism in South and Southeast Asia
IDH 4200-012
Instructor: Angsumala Tamang
W | 2:00 PM – 4:45 PM

If global politics in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries marked the effects of European colonialism in South and Southeast Asia, the second half of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries have been categorized as belonging to an era of post-colonialism. Post-colonialism, of course implies that the struggle for national liberation from colonial rule has been “successful” and that the formerly colonized “state” and its people are now independent of foreign control. However, does it mean that centuries of imposed imperial rule and cultural dominance end with the formation of an independent nation-state? Or, does the colonial discourse continue via processes of nation-building, neocolonialism, and culture works that underpin colonial legacy through complex overlapping structures of social, historical, traditional, and native hierarchies?

Starting with South Asia – India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka – we will travel to Southeast Asia via Myanmar, Vietnam, and Cambodia. The readings will focus on theoretical discussions and critical thinking with the objective of stimulating interdisciplinary understanding of postcolonial realities via readings on music, dance, and film studies in relation to the politics of representation involving nationalism, religion, language, gender, caste, and class.

Sub-Saharan Africa
IDH 4200-013
Instructor: Fenda Akiwumi
M/W | 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM

This class will look at culture, societies, and development in Sub-Saharan Africa, in historical and contemporary context. It will be a broad interdisciplinary introduction to the study of this part of the African continent. Africa’s history, politics, cultures, and societies are rich, diverse, and complex yet generalizations and negative stereotypes about Africa by the media, academics, and policy-makers are common (apocalyptic scenarios of civil war, poverty, famine, diseases such as AIDS and failed states, for example). Using selected case studies we will explore political, economic, and socio-cultural characteristics of both modern and traditional Africa and through critical evaluation of course materials obtain a more balanced portrayal of the continent and its development.

Collaborative Service-Learning in Ghana: Transforming Spectators into Problem-Solvers
IDH 4200-014
Instructor: Elizabeth Doone
T/R | 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM

The purpose of this course is to foster a mutually beneficial exchange of knowledge about real -life issues that challenge communities. Utilizing a multi-disciplinary lens, students will collaboratively select a shared concern with a global peer mentor, generate ideas and responses, critically weigh options and create an action plan. This course is relevant for honors students desiring to immerse in a cultural exchange of ideas and understandings while honing their communication and problem-solving skills.

International Relations
IDH 4200-015
Instructor: Rep. Gus Bilirakis
F | 2:00 PM – 4:45 PM

Course Description coming soon.

(Global)2 Perspectives of Health: Exploring Components of Holistic Health in the Global North and South
IDH 4200-016
[This course is certified as part of the Medical Humanities in a Global Context (MHGC) pathway; it is open to all Honors students]
Instructor: Lydia Asana
M/W | 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM

This course focuses on comparative explorations of holistic health in the Global North and Global South. In this course, students will identify existing narratives of health in terms of the Global North and South while becoming familiar with four primary components of holistic health namely: Body, mind, spirit (faith/culture) and environment (geographical/societal). Students will explore the significance of the four primary components with respect to a selected country or region and will be challenged to objectively compare and contrast predominant narratives and alternative perspectives in light of course content and independent research findings. Towards the end of the course, students will each present their findings and collaborate to bring forth conclusions and contributions to the understanding of, and approaches to, addressing holistic health around the world.

Anticipated outcomes of this course include expanded knowledge through instruction and contributions from experts including guest speakers and sharpened critical thinking through interactive, guided discussions that incorporate knowledge acquired, experiences shared, and possibilities imagined in the context of global perspectives. This course will enable students to foster their research skills through individual exploration of a given country or region and enhance their communication skills through presentation of research findings using diverse methods. Ultimately, students will expand their intellectual and professional skills through reflection papers and the integration of individual interests and talents in the choice of guided project presentation format. Finally, a deeper appreciation for the benefits of collaboration will be earned through the integration of ideas and findings towards re-imagined conclusions about global perspectives of health, particularly with respect to the Global North and the Global South. 

Arab Literature, Culture & Film
IDH 4200-017
Instructor: Raja Benchekroun
T/R | 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM 

Arab Literature, Culture and Film is a gateway to the Arab World based on scholarly research, authentic voices, textual, translated resources, media, and literature by authors of Arab origins. The course will introduce students to the variety of languages, dialects and cultures in the region which comprise a kaleidoscopic wealth of the world’s most ancient societies, and major past/ current events that transformed the Arab region.

Global Perspectives of Financialization
IDH 4200-018
Instructor: Olubukola Olayiwola
M/W | 8:00 AM – 9:15 AM 

The term financialization may bring to mind the constellation of global financial-economic activities in the hands of “smart” experts on Wall Street, but financialization extends beyond these activities to the daily lives of people all over the world. In this class, our examination of financialization will take a global view. We will begin with a close look at Wall Street, the regime of accumulation, and shareholder value orientation. We will then direct our searchlight to the often taken-for-granted financial activities in everyday lives of market vendors and commodity producers who inhabit the informal economic sector, particularly in the global south with emphasis on sub-Saharan Africa. In this course, we will examine the development of the concept of financialization drawing from different fields in social sciences. We will critique the concept of financialization including its limits (analytic, theoretical, strategic, optic and empiric limits). We will debate various international development issues and anthropology of development including those rooted in global capitalism and neoliberalism (e.g., microfinance). And we will link our discussion to major anthropological debates on the informal and formal economic sectors. Drawing from readings examining the lives and experiences of various communities, we will suggest essential components of everyday lives and livelihood, which must be factored in to understand what constitutes financialization, be it at the level of household, community, or state.   

UN Sustainable Development Goals and Global Competencies 
IDH 4200-019
Instructor: Parandoosh Sadeghinia
T/R | 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM 

In 2015, all United Nations members shared a blueprint for peace and prosperity for people and the planet with an agenda to achieve specific goals by 2030. This blueprint is known as the 17 Sustainable Development Goals. In this course, students will engage in high impact activities related to each goal. This course is designed to help students critically acknowledge global issues and systematically analyze global challenges, leading them to work towards feasible and sustainable solutions. Students will develop an in depth understanding of cultural pluralism, efficacy, global centrism, and interconnectedness through the lens of global competency. In addition, they will be encouraged to apply socio- political theories to problem- solving oriented class activities, group projects, and a final paper.

IDH 4930: Special Topics in Honors

Honors Seminar in Pharmacy
IDH 4930-001

Instructor: Yashwant Pathak
W | 2:00pm – 4:45pm

Learn about innovation in the pharmaceutical sciences directly from faculty researchers of the Taneja College of Pharmacy! In this seminar, you will have the opportunity to hear first-hand experiences about technological advances in pharmacy, basic sciences in pharmacy, pharmacogenomics, geriatrics, and drug discovery. You will work on a culminating project with mentorship by faculty of the Taneja College of Pharmacy.

 

IDH 4950: Honors Capstone (permit required)

To apply for a permit, click here.

Perspectives in Performing Arts Healthcare
IDH 4950-001
[This course is certified as part of the Medical Humanities in a Global Context (MHGC) pathway; it is open to all Honors students]
Instructor: Nancy Burns
T/R | 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM

Performing artists are individuals who engage in creative and artistic activity as discipline and career that includes dance, music, drama, and other expressive arts. Identifying the occupational risks affecting performing artist is an emerging interdisciplinary field of study among artists, educators, and healthcare professionals.

In this course, performing artists will be framed as workers whose occupational craft (dancing, playing music, singing, etc.) is their employment. Students will be introduced to the values and culture of performing artists and learn health concerns among this population. 

Becoming the Next Problem Solver: Creator, Thinker, Changemaker
IDH 4950-002
Instructor: Michael Cross
T/R | 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM

In this course, we use the lens of the UN Sustainable Development Goals (UNSDG) to develop solutions to Real World Problems–a core assignment–in collaboration with a community partner. Examples of previous projects include UNSDG (2) Zero Hunger to propose increased community garden development within the Uptown Tampa Innovation Quarter, UNSDG (9) Industry, Innovation, and Infrastructure to identify new transit methods in partnership with Hillsborough Area Regional Transit, and UNSDG (12) Sustainable Consumption and Production to assist a company in converting to recyclable marketing mailers.  We also engage in a series of assignments to answer questions critical to your personal and professional development such as “What do you want to do vs what do you want to be?” and “What’s your next?” 

Civic Literacy and Current Events
IDH 4950-003
Instructor: Dan Ruth
T | 8:00 AM – 10:45 AM

This is a class designed to give students an enhanced understanding of world events and civic institutions that influence our lives. Having a better grasp of the swirling news events that occur everyday is essential to becoming a more engaged citizen. To that end, students will be required to read a daily newspaper as well as follow other informational platforms from television, to NPR, so social media. This course will include a weekly news quiz. Students will also participate in weekly team presentations exploring i-depth some aspect of current events and/or various civic institutions. It is said the journalism that goes into reporting the news is, in fact, the first draft of history. The goals of this course are two-fold. First, students will become better informed and thus more aware of stories that form their world view. Second, students will gain a keener appreciation of the journalistic challenges associated with keeping them informed.

This class will also require a Capstone writing project if about, 3,000 words. The topic will be a reflection on how news events over the course of the student's life have served to shape and influence their world view.

Exploring Behind the Veil: The New Honors Building
IDH 4950-004
Instructor: Atsuko Sakai
T/R | 3:30 PM – 4:45 PM

Construction of our new home has begun! Let’s use this rare opportunity to capture a unique moment in the history of our Judy Genshaft Honors College. While observing parts of the building structure being constructed, we will explore the concept of architectural design and imagine the future of our innovative learning environment. This course will take you to a backstage tour of the multi-year design process we have gone through and you will be exposed to various design features that support the complex building systems and functions through readings, review of visual documents, hands-on design exercises, site visits, and interactions with different specialists from the large design & construction team. In addition to learning about the physical design elements (i.e., what’s in the building such as structure, lighting, building materials, and landscape), we will discuss how we actually experience 3-dimensional spaces and the effects of our surroundings on our behavior, mood, and learning in particular. In order to examine both human factors and environmental factors, we will be actively exchanging ideas on a variety of topics including: nature and sustainability; neuroscience and environmental psychology; and disability and accessibility. No previous architectural knowledge or design experience is required—students from all majors are welcome to join our first expedition.

Reproductive Health, Rights, and Justice
IDH 4950-005
[This course is certified as part of the Medical Humanities in a Global Context (MHGC) pathway; it is open to all Honors students]
Instructor: Holly Donahue Singh
T/R | 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM 

This course examines contemporary social movements around reproductive health, rights, and justice in global historical contexts. The historical and cross-cultural examination of debates about, and advocacy around, reproduction will ground students' research into current medical, legislative, and social reform movements aimed at changing the ways people imagine human futures and work to create them through policy, education, and activism. Students' research will serve as the basis for creating their own projects aimed at increasing public understanding of their topics in the form of a public event, a podcast, an exhibition, a website, a course syllabus, a documentary, or another form.

Connections: Mental Healthcare, Community Engagement, and Art
IDH 4950-006
[This course is certified as part of the Medical Humanities in a Global Context (MHGC) pathway; it is open to all Honors students]
Instructor: Catherine Wilkins
R | 2:00 PM – 4:45 PM

In this collaboration between the USF Honors College and the Tampa Museum of Art, Honors students learn about medical conditions such as dementia, depression, substance use disorder, and PTSD and are trained to facilitate interactions with works of art for patient groups dealing with these diagnoses.  Students will learn how to deliver therapeutic interactions with art that allow participants to give their own personal interpretations without fear of judgment or failure.  The methods utilized in class have been found to help patients access and express memories, improve communication skills, externalize emotions, relieve stress and anxiety, and promote positive feelings. This class will also instruct students in the practices of observation, deep listening, and critical thinking, build empathy and understanding, and engage students with the community.  This capstone course will allow students to participate in furthering the research in these areas by providing an immersive experience at the intersection of art, medicine, and mental health.  Please note that this class meets at the Tampa Museum of Art – allow time for traveling back and forth when you are planning your schedule. Transportation is not provided, but parking is validated.

Transitional Justice
IDH 4950-007
Instructor: Alma Dedic Sarenkapa
T/R | 11:00 AM – 12:15 PM

In the realm of international politics, countries in transition from an authoritarian regime to democracy or from war to peace often face multiple transitions and different challenges, for instance, the challenge of overcoming past abuses of human rights such as political executions, ethnic cleansing, or mass murder. Such societies at times reach for transitional justice mechanisms to redress past atrocities and human rights violations. Transitional Justice (TJ) mechanisms consist of judicial and non-judicial measures, including truth-seeking mechanisms, reparation programs, and institutional reforms. This complex set of measures if applied in counties in transition can offer reconciliatory elements for grieving and often divided societies on their path to democracy and global trends.

This course will offer an exploration of Transitional Justice mechanisms using real-life experiences. Yet, together we will reach even further and look into our own society and communities we live in. What can we learn from societies in transition? Can we apply such measures and experience in our own society and communities? In this course, students will practice how to bridge the gap between academic concepts, and real-life experiences in a complex environment using problem solving approach and TJ tools. This course may be of particular interest to students in the field of politics, law, humanities, criminology, planning, sociology, history, and ethics. Through a series of thematic sessions, case studies, workshops, round table, and focus group discussions from human rights and socio-political perspective this course is designed to also enhance students’ critical thinking, team-work, and communication skills.

 “A New Lens”
IDH 4950-008
Instructor: Leslie Elsasser
F | 9:30 AM – 12:15 PM

The artistic lens can provide ways of knowing and a means of understanding everyday realities.  "A New Lens" offers an innovative, curriculum through an active course of study that is grounded in USF Contemporary Art Museum’s art exhibitions, research and close looking at art dedicated to socially engaged artistic practices.  In this trans-disciplinary arts-based course, Honors students will learn the latest skills and practicum to create, design and facilitate a 21st-century tour at the USF Contemporary Art Museum, through object-based learning, interpretive skills, readings, and practice in the museum.  The course addresses pertinent issues of our day, diverse perspectives, and blurs the boundaries between artmaking, education, and anthropological, sociological, economic, historical, and medical issues facing us today.  The arts are powerful tools.  They highlight our social contexts and have a role as a catalyst that can trigger ideas, stories, conversations and in  "A New Lens" will help amplify your stories that needs to be heard.  They offer the potential to improve tangible, transferable skills necessary within emerging interdisciplinary and interprofessional professions, including enhanced perspective, mindful reflection, research, visual literacy, sharpened analytic and diagnostic capabilities, increased tolerance for ambiguity, and improved teamwork and communication.

High Impact Practices in Medicine
IDH 4950-009
[This course is certified as part of the Medical Humanities in a Global Context (MHGC) pathway; it is open to all Honors students]
Instructor: Donna Ettel
W | 2:00 PM – 4:45 PM

What ethical and legal obligations do hospitals have to patients? What challenges and issues arise while conducting healthcare quality projects? How are quality of care and cost of delivery related? Using literature (Foucault's The Birth of the Clinic, Gawande's Better: A Surgeon's Notes on Performance, and others) and film (The English Surgeon, Malice, and others), this course purposes to instill the knowledge of community needs through cultural enlightenment, interdisciplinary practices, and real-life experience. This course will primarily focus on clinical outcomes, process change, and emphasizes analysis of the patient care process to identify specific interventions. Students will learn to incorporate the research process as they conduct an actual healthcare outcomes study utilizing a quantitative research approach. Students will be prepared to present findings and practical applications to hospital administrators. Designed for students interested in interprofessional healthcare delivery, this course seeks to assist students with developing competencies expected of professional programs. Additional topics include an overview of accreditation standards; licensure agencies; reimbursement systems; legal/ethical issues; healthcare computerization; documentation, quality, compliance, and regulatory requirements and HIPPA compliance.

Systems Thinking for Sustainability
IDH 4950-010
Instructor: Kebreab Ghebremichael
T | 8:00 AM – 10:45 AM

In this course, we will examine the concept of sustainability and we will use systems thinking to explore interdependencies in the three pillars of sustainability (social, economic, and environment). In this course we will apply system thinking tools to analyze complex problems and develop robust solutions driven by trade-offs between the system components.  

We will use case studies to help define what a sustainable development is. This course will then use social science field methods to demonstrate how one can develop culturally appropriate projects by engaging community members/organizations throughout a project’s lifecycle. The course will provide students an in-depth engagement with colleagues and peers through group project.

Visual Narratives
IDH 4950-011
Instructor: Tamara Nemirovsky
F | 9:30 AM – 12:15 PM

In this class, you will have the opportunity to work collectively in producing a documentary. You will learn how to Pre-produce (developing story ideas, research, developing a proposal and pitching, writing a treatment, script, writing questions to interview participants), how to Produce (the logistic of filming well planned and well execute interviews and shoots that include conceptual aspect as framing, types of shots, etc. as well as technical aspect like camera use, light, sound, etc.) and how to Post- Produce (editing concepts, process and use of editing software) to turn your project into a documentary that re-tell the stories of our community in a meaningful and reflective way. During the semester, you will explore how to produce a short documentary about Tampa’s communities’ stories through visual narration.

If you pay attention, your knowledge of what is happening around you is many times communicated through images, either through photography, videos, or movies. Your generation is perhaps the one that most frequently uses visual elements to create social memories. Most of the time this process is not evident, and you do not even reflect on its social functions, this Honors’ class will teach you to do precisely that. You can decide to work on science, sports, politics, media, fashion, music, generational issues, and whatever you might like to investigate to know it better within Tampa Bay’s local events and/or communities. This course does not require previous film knowledge or experience. You will use your smartphone to shoot.

IDH 4970: Honors Thesis I & II

IDH 4970-001
IDH 4970-002
Instructor: Atsuko Sakai 

The Honors Thesis consists of Thesis I & Thesis II. It is a two-semester program where students will conduct an independent study under the guidance of their own thesis chair selected by each student. The thesis process mirrors a mentorship system common in graduate schools (e.g., dissertation for a Ph.D. program). By closely working with your own chair, you will come up with a research topic, develop research methods, and produce your own creative work such as a research paper, artwork, a business proposal, etc. It is a great opportunity to create your own unique research project, learn from faculty about the research process, and gain research skills. We recommend that students who are interested in the Honors Thesis prepare early. Permit required. Please go to Honors Thesis for more information, or compare different Research Track options. 001 for first-semester thesis; 002 for second-semester thesis.