Current Students

Fall 2020 Courses

The Judy Genshaft Honors College offers courses located on all three USF campuses, as well as off-site locations. Judy Genshaft Honors College courses are open to students from any home campus.

Location: USF Sarasota Manatee campus

IDH 2010: Acquisition of Knowledge  

Acquisition of Knowledge: Interdisciplinary Inquiry and Practical Wisdom
IDH 2010-501
Instructor: Raman Sachdev
T/R | 3:30pm – 4:45pm
Permit Required

Ranging from classical philosophy to the digital age, the course invites students to explore the different ways in which knowledge is created and consumed, how understanding is cultivated, the various relationships possible between knowledge and the self, and the implications of these in our contemporary world. Through an examination of common topics, studio experiences, and assignments, all sections of this course will explore different ways of knowing (e.g., historical, philosophical, scientific, creative, etc.)


Location: USF St. Petersburg campus

IDH 2010: Acquisition of Knowledge

Acquisition of Knowledge: Interdisciplinary Inquiry and Practical Wisdom
IDH 2010-601
Instructor: Raman Sachdev
M/W | 1:00 PM – 2:15 PM
Located on St. Petersburg campus

Ranging from classical philosophy to the digital age, the course invites students to explore the different ways in which knowledge is created and consumed, how understanding is cultivated, the various relationships possible between knowledge and the self, and the implications of these in our contemporary world. Through an examination of common topics, studio experiences, and assignments, all sections of this course will explore different ways of knowing (e.g., historical, philosophical, scientific, creative, etc.)

Acquisition of Knowledge: Interdisciplinary Inquiry and Practical Wisdom
IDH 2010-602
Instructor: Raman Sachdev
M/W | 2:30 PM – 3:45 PM
Located on St. Petersburg campus
 
Ranging from classical philosophy to the digital age, the course invites students to explore the different ways in which knowledge is created and consumed, how understanding is cultivated, the various relationships possible between knowledge and the self, and the implications of these in our contemporary world. Through an examination of common topics, studio experiences, and assignments, all sections of this course will explore different ways of knowing (e.g., historical, philosophical, scientific, creative, etc.) 

 

IDH 3100: Arts & Humanities

New Media, Art, and Culture
IDH 3100-601 (cross-listed with IDH 4000-691)
Instructor: Catherine Wilkins
M/W 11:00am - 12:15pm
Location: St. Petersburg campus
 
For the past two hundred years, technology has been transforming traditional creative practices.  From the invention of photography in 1827 to the advent of video games and CGI, this course will explore the evolution of “new media” such as these from a historical perspective, while also examining the key theoretical issues in the past and present philosophy and practice of New Media Arts.  In so doing, the course will provide students with a critical analytical framework for approaching the contemporary media culture that we interact with on a daily basis.  Additionally, we will seek to expand upon these commonplace experiences with “new media” through unusual hands-on projects, such as building a camera obscura and designing a virtual reality experience.

 

IDH 3400: Social and Behavioral Sciences

Chinese Politics and Culture
IDH 3400-602
Instructor: Patti Weeks
Wednesday | 1:00pm – 3:30pm
Location: St. Petersburg campus

The fall of the Qing Dynasty marked the end of China’s ancient dynastic rule and the rise of a modern day world power.  This course explores China’s journey from insular kingdom to influential state, focusing on the political, economic, and cultural transformation that has bemused politicians, seduced merchants, and intrigued the world.  We will investigate the psychological effects of political campaigns and the various means that governments employ to create mass movements that mobilize citizens to accomplish State objectives.  We will explore both classic texts and lesser known reads discussing the salient issues that make China unique.

Introduction to Comparative Politics: China
CPO 2002-602 (Honors Only; Cross listed with IDH 3400-602)
Instructor: Patti Weeks
Wednesday | 1:00 PM – 3:30 PM
Permit Required
 
This Honors-only class will focus on China in comparative perspective. The fall of the Qing Dynasty marked the end of China’s ancient dynastic rule and the rise of a modern day world power.  This course explores China’s journey from insular kingdom to influential state, focusing on the political, economic, and cultural transformation that has bemused politicians, seduced merchants, and intrigued the world.  We will investigate the psychological effects of political campaigns and the various means that governments employ to create mass movements that mobilize citizens to accomplish State objectives.  We will explore both classic texts and lesser known reads discussing the salient issues that make China unique.

 

IDH 4000: Major Works/Majors Issues

Literature of Migration, Diaspora, and Exile
IDH 4000-601 (cross listed with IDH 4200-601)
Instructor: Tracey Maher
T/R | 1:00pm – 2:15pm
Permit Required

While migration is as old as humanity, the 20th and 21st centuries have seen an unprecedented amount of human movement across the globe. In this course, we will analyze literary narratives of migration, diaspora, and exile. Students will read a range of texts covering key cases of human displacement across the globe, then focus on the particular case of Arab migration, diaspora, and exile to Europe, America and within the Arab world itself. Our texts will include novels, short stories, and poems, as well as other less obviously literary texts. In addition to the key concepts of migration, diaspora, and exile, we will explore ideas such as home, homeland, nation, travel, émigré, and refugee. As we explore these texts and concepts, we will consider how the experience of human displacement is refracted by factors such as gender, class, religion, race, and historical context. We will consider how past experiences of displacement can shed light on migration, diaspora, and exile in our own historical moment. 

How to Make History
IDH 4000-602 (cross-listed with IDH 4950-701)
Instructor: Catherine Wilkins
Friday 9:30am - 12:15pm
Location: Off-campus
Permit Required

In 1963, Martin Luther King, Jr. wrote that “We are made by history,” emphasizing the importance of historical events and narratives in constructing our understanding of the world and ourselves. Many of us might think of History – the academic discipline - as little more than a sequence of objective facts, a chronological list of important names, dates, and battles. In reality, history – as a lived experience – is much more personal and intimate. It is experienced every day, by every individual. Events, from the mundane to momentous, are experienced and remembered by people, recorded by some, and passed along to future generations, hopefully for their edification. This course will focus on how History might shape our identity as residents of the Tampa Bay area, with an emphasis on the process by which History is made, and the role that we might play – as students, researchers, and practitioners – in making history ourselves. In partnership with the St. Pete Beach Public Library, the Gulf Beaches Historical Museum, and the Pinellas Memory project, this Honors Capstone course will provide students with hands-on experience in: recording oral histories, producing documentary photography, digitizing visual and print artifacts, cataloguing and creating a historical archive, and developing an exhibition/program of their work. Our goal will be to digitize and add to the collection of the Gulf Beaches Historical Museum, and to contribute our work to the Pinellas Memory online archive of historical artifacts. This is a service learning course, meaning that we integrate community service with guided reflection into the curriculum to enhance and enrich student learning of course material. PLEASE NOTE: About half of the classes during the semester take place off-campus, on beautiful Pass-a-Grille beach in Pinellas County. Off-campus classes begin promptly at 9:30 and last until 12:15. Students must provide their own transportation and ensure that they leave enough time in their schedule for travel.

New Media, Art, and Culture
IDH 4000-691 (cross listed with IDH 3100-601)
Instructor: Catherine Wilkins
M/W 11:00-12:15
Location: St. Petersburg campus
Permit Required

For the past two hundred years, technology has been transforming traditional creative practices. From the invention of photography in 1827 to the advent of video games and CGI, this course will explore the evolution of “new media” such as these from a historical perspective, while also examining the key theoretical issues in the past and present philosophy and practice of New Media Arts. In so doing, the course will provide students with a critical analytical framework for approaching the contemporary media culture that we interact with on a daily basis. Additionally, we will seek to expand upon these commonplace experiences with “new media” through unusual hands-on projects, such as building a camera obscura and designing a virtual reality experience.

 

 

 

 

IDH: 4200 Geographical Perspectives

Literature of Migration, Diaspora, and Exile
IDH 4200-601 (cross listed with IDH 4000-601)
Instructor: Tracey Maher
Day/Time: T/R | 1:00 PM – 2:15 PM
Location: St. Petersburg campus

While migration is as old as humanity, the 20th and 21st centuries have seen an unprecedented amount of human movement across the globe. In this course, we will analyze literary narratives of migration, diaspora, and exile. Students will read a range of texts covering key cases of human displacement across the globe, then focus on the particular case of Arab migration, diaspora, and exile to Europe, America and within the Arab world itself. Our texts will include novels, short stories, and poems, as well as other less obviously literary texts. In addition to the key concepts of migration, diaspora, and exile, we will explore ideas such as home, homeland, nation, travel, émigré, and refugee. As we explore these texts and concepts, we will consider how the experience of human displacement is refracted by factors such as gender, class, religion, race, and historical context. We will consider how past experiences of displacement can shed light on migration, diaspora, and exile in our own historical moment.

 

IDH 4950: Honors Capstone

How to Make History
IDH 4950-701  (course cross-listed with IDH 4000-602)
Instructor: Catherine Wilkins
F 9:30-12:15
Location: Off-campus

In 1963, Martin Luther King, Jr. wrote that “We are made by history,” emphasizing the importance of historical events and narratives in constructing our understanding of the world and ourselves. Many of us might think of History – the academic discipline - as little more than a sequence of objective facts, a chronological list of important names, dates, and battles. In reality, history – as a lived experience – is much more personal and intimate. It is experienced every day, by every individual. Events, from the mundane to momentous, are experienced and remembered by people, recorded by some, and passed along to future generations, hopefully for their edification. This course will focus on how History might shape our identity as residents of the Tampa Bay area, with an emphasis on the process by which History is made, and the role that we might play – as students, researchers, and practitioners – in making history ourselves. In partnership with the St. Pete Beach Public Library, the Gulf Beaches Historical Museum, and the Pinellas Memory project, this Honors Capstone course will provide students with hands-on experience in: recording oral histories, producing documentary photography, digitizing visual and print artifacts, cataloguing and creating a historical archive, and developing an exhibition/program of their work. Our goal will be to digitize and add to the collection of the Gulf Beaches Historical Museum, and to contribute our work to the Pinellas Memory online archive of historical artifacts. This is a service learning course, meaning that we integrate community service with guided reflection into the curriculum to enhance and enrich student learning of course material. PLEASE NOTE: About half of the classes during the semester take place off-campus, on beautiful Pass-a-Grille beach in Pinellas County. Off-campus classes begin promptly at 9:30 and last until 12:15. Students must provide their own transportation and ensure that they leave enough time in their schedule for travel.

 

 

IDH 4970: Honors Thesis

Honors Thesis
IDH 4970-601
Instructor: Thomas Smith
Friday | 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM
Location: St. Petersburg campus
Permit Required

The thesis is the culmination of your Honors experience. The thesis emphasizes critical thinking, high-quality research, top-flight writing, and independent, creative work. The goal is to produce a work of publishable or exhibitable quality. In most cases the thesis may relate to your major, but this is not a requirement. A good way to get started it to glance through the electronic archive of past USF St. Petersburg honors theses here: https://digital.usfsp.edu/honorstheses/

 


Location: Off-Site

IDH 4950: Honors Capstone

 

How to Make History
IDH 4950-701  (course cross-listed with IDH 4000-602)
Instructor: Catherine Wilkins
Friday 9:30-12:15
Location: Off-campus

In 1963, Martin Luther King, Jr. wrote that “We are made by history,” emphasizing the importance of historical events and narratives in constructing our understanding of the world and ourselves. Many of us might think of History – the academic discipline - as little more than a sequence of objective facts, a chronological list of important names, dates, and battles. In reality, history – as a lived experience – is much more personal and intimate. It is experienced every day, by every individual. Events, from the mundane to momentous, are experienced and remembered by people, recorded by some, and passed along to future generations, hopefully for their edification. This course will focus on how History might shape our identity as residents of the Tampa Bay area, with an emphasis on the process by which History is made, and the role that we might play – as students, researchers, and practitioners – in making history ourselves. In partnership with the St. Pete Beach Public Library, the Gulf Beaches Historical Museum, and the Pinellas Memory project, this Honors Capstone course will provide students with hands-on experience in: recording oral histories, producing documentary photography, digitizing visual and print artifacts, cataloguing and creating a historical archive, and developing an exhibition/program of their work. Our goal will be to digitize and add to the collection of the Gulf Beaches Historical Museum, and to contribute our work to the Pinellas Memory online archive of historical artifacts. This is a service learning course, meaning that we integrate community service with guided reflection into the curriculum to enhance and enrich student learning of course material. PLEASE NOTE: About half of the classes during the semester take place off-campus, on beautiful Pass-a-Grille beach in Pinellas County. Off-campus classes begin promptly at 9:30 and last until 12:15. Students must provide their own transportation and ensure that they leave enough time in their schedule for travel.

 

Connections: Mental Healthcare, Community Engagement, and Art
IDH 4950.702
Instructor: Catherine Wilkins
Wednesday 2:00-4:45 PM
Location: Off-campus

In this collaboration between the USF Honors College and the Tampa Museum of Art, Honors students learn about medical conditions such as dementia, depression, substance use disorder, and PTSD and are trained to facilitate interactions with works of art for patient groups dealing with these diagnoses.  Students will learn how to deliver therapeutic interactions with art that allow participants to give their own personal interpretations without fear of judgment or failure.  The methods utilized in class have been found to help patients access and express memories, improve communication skills, externalize emotions, relieve stress and anxiety, and promote positive feelings. This class will also instruct students in the practices of observation, deep listening, and critical thinking, build empathy and understanding, and engage students with the community.  This capstone course will allow students to participate in furthering the research in these areas by providing an immersive experience at the intersection of art, medicine, and mental health.  Please note that this class meets at the Tampa Museum of Art – allow time for traveling back and forth when you are planning your schedule. Transportation is not provided. Due to high demand, an application process is used to select students for this course. For full consideration, students should apply by March 27; decisions will be given by March 29. APPLY HERE: https://goo.gl/forms/1gpVC5MZ9rz5Ysmm1


 


Location: USF Tampa campus

IDH 2010: Acquisition of Knowledge

Acquisition of Knowledge: Interdisciplinary Inquiry and Practical Wisdom
IDH: 2010

Ranging from classical philosophy to the digital age, the course invites students to explore the different ways in which knowledge is created and consumed, how understanding is cultivated, the various relationships possible between knowledge and the self, and the implications of these in our contemporary world. Through an examination of common topics, studio experiences, and assignments, all sections of this course will explore different ways of knowing (e.g., historical, philosophical, scientific, creative, etc.)

Note: This freshman seminar is intended as an introduction to the Judy Genshaft Honors College community for incoming students. There are many sections of this course on the Tampa campus, please work with your Honors advisor to select the time that is best for you.

 

IDH 2930: Special Topics in Honors

Backstage Pass to Healthcare Professions
2930-050
Instructor: Tricia Penniecook
Monday | 4:00pm - 4:50pm
This is a 1 credit course
 
In our currently evolving health care system, there is a growing emphasis on team-based approaches. Such approaches require that health professions training focus on interprofessional education. This course provides students who plan to pursue a health profession an opportunity to see what happens “backstage” in the health care field by shadowing interprofessional teams. The students will rotate among interprofessional teams that may consist of: medical students, residents, physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, pharmacists, physical therapists, social workers, health administrators, health educators, etc. The students will present their experiences during the class period and complete assignments in order to receive credit.

 

IDH 3100: Arts & Humanities

 

Narrative Cartography
IDH 3100-001
Instructor: Ulluminair Salim
M/W | 11:00am – 12:15pm
 
“You can kiss your family and friends goodbye and put miles between you, but at the same time you carry them with you in your heart, your mind, your stomach; because you do not just live in a world but a world lives in you.”
—Frederick Buechner, Author and Theologian
 
Cartography is the study and practice of map-making, and Narrative Cartography invites students to map the stories of their lives, challenging traditional notions of space, place, and structure. Through reading, writing, and multilayered forms of journeying, students will examine manifold ways to tell stories that matter, from the mundane to the profound. This practice-oriented course leverages both written narrative and traditional and contemporary cartographic methods to visit personal places seldom explored.
 
 
Cities, Heterotopias & Science Fiction
IDH 3100-002
Instructor: Alan Bush
T/R | 9:30am – 10:45am
 
This course will attempt to use the authorship of science fiction to shape the course of the future.
 
If and how we flourish as individuals and communities is interdependent. Our experience of ourselves is strongly influenced by the community in which we live. Our communities are heavily influenced by the sorts of institutions that reproduce them. The sorts of institutions that exist within our communities is heavily influenced by what preceding generations thought possible. What our ancestors through possible was enabled & constrained by the art they experienced, as the distillation of the “desirable-possible.” A flourishing community therefore depends upon having vibrant art.   
 
We live in the Urbanocene, a geologic era in which cities contain the majority of all humans, and urban society influences the geologic and biological composition of the globe.  This course will explore this question: what is the "desirable-possible” for our urban Earth? To explore this, the course will use case studies of heterotopias. A heterotopia is an “other place” that stands outside of our experience, without being a utopia (desirable but not possible) or a dystopia (possible but not desirable). The course will use case studies of contemporary & historical cities, and stories from science fiction to prepare for the authorship of short works of science fiction.  The course will be a writing group, reviewing, appreciating, contesting, nurturing, refining and contributing to each others’ work over the course of the semester.

 

Rocking the Dead Sea Scrolls
IDH 3100-003
Instructor: Jeffery Donley
M/W |  9:30am-10:45am

In March 1947, a young Bedouin goat herder followed two of his wandering goats into the cliffs along the northwestern shore of the Dead Sea. After one of the goats entered an opening in the rocks, Muhammad picked up a rock and tossed it through a second opening. Hearing the sound of breaking pottery, he entered the cave and found scrolls wrapped in linen clothe inside clay jars. Young Muhammad literally “rocked” the Dead Sea Scrolls. The Dead Sea Scrolls have been hailed as the greatest, most important, and dramatic discoveries of the 20th century. In this course students will explore the discovery of around 1000 ancient manuscripts (dating from the third century BC to the first century AD) in eleven caves on the northwestern shore of the Dead Sea. The content of this multi-media course is an interdisciplinary approach that integrates literature, history, language, sociology, archeology, films, published articles, and special research conducted by your professor and from Dr. Norman Golb, one of the leading experts in the field. Students will make a detailed study of aspects of the Hebrew Bible or Old Testament, sectarianism in the Second Temple Judaism, the archaeological site of Khirbet Qumran, Biblical texts from the eleven caves, the Copper Scroll, relationship to the beginnings of Christianity, and its laws in comparison to contemporary Jewish Halakhah. All readings are in English.
 

Creator, Images and Sounds
IDH 3100-004
Instructor: Tamara Nemirovsky
Friday | 12:30pm – 3:15pm

In this class students will learn how to produce a video that reflect the understanding of current events and their own response to them through the creation of a fictional narrative. They will become creators of images and sounds that capture their own subjective interpretation of problems that local communities are facing today.

This class will focus on concept development, image and sound composition, research, storyboarding, film language and construction of meaning through the creation of multiple visual layers and sounds during filming and editing as well as all technical aspects (lighting, sound, editing software) required to produce a creative video.

Students will collectively explore the aesthetic and rhythmic qualities of images and sounds to evoke emotions and meanings in the viewer. They will research on human-social problems (violence, guns, education, poverty, climate change, addictions, communication, etc.) affecting communities today and develop a video art piece that will question at the same time the audience’s and their own systems of beliefs. Students will develop their capacity to recognize how we create understanding through the production of a video step by step, and how creative and fictional work can address their current social and cultural concerns. This course does not require previous film/art knowledge or experience. You will use a DLSR camera. 

 

Russia: Culture and Legend
IDH 3100-005
Instructor: Nana Tutinya
Wednesday | 2:00pm – 4:45pm
 
Russia’s enigmatic presence on the world’s cultural scene defies both the geographic distance and the ideological isolation it experienced in the past. Its brilliant literature, its satire, the timeless music scores, classical ballet, and avant-garde art and architecture win audiences in the Western world, but not an understanding of this unique culture. This class will investigate the distinct dimensions of the Russian culture, such as logocentrism, soul-searching, morality, religious orthodoxy, liberalism, patriotism, nostalgia, and preoccupation with the West to find out more about the nation behind the culture. We will look into the cultural influences Russia itself had absorbed, the sources of its growth and cohesion, diversity, innovation, and projected development. Focusing on different examples of the unique cultural expression in Russia by watching movies, videos, ballet, reading literature, and experiencing as much of it as possible firsthand we will attempt to find out what has been lost in translation and what Russian culture can still potentially contribute to the world. 
 
 
 
Travel Writing and Literature
IDH 3100-006
Instructor: Deepak Singh
M/W | 9:30am – 10:45am
 
In this course, students will explore the prose genre of travel writing while living and studying abroad. They will closely read current and traditional short pieces, essays, and books and analyze them like writers. They will write essays and stories inspired by the readings, and/or their own travels. This course is especially suited to students who have studied abroad, plan to study abroad, or have experience as an international student; however, such experience or plans are not required. This course will give students the opportunity to engage with a variety of views of the world through the accounts of travelers from a variety of cultural and historical lenses. In the process, students will write a story of their own--fiction, non-fiction, or another genre—centering on the transformative potential of travel.

 

"Gotta Dance": The Greatest Dancers
IDH 3100-007
Instructor: Jeffery Donley
M/W | 11:00am – 12:15pm

The phrase "Gotta Dance" comes from perhaps the greatest musical ever made--"Singing in the Rain." Dancing is movement and movement permeates every aspect of life, whether within our bodies, minds, or the world around us. This class is an interdisciplinary integration of creative and critical methods for researching human movement that introduces the aesthetics and creative processes in dance and choreography. You will think critically about dance performance and you will be engaged on dance as a performing art form by transforming you into the roles of dancer, choreographer, audience member, and critic in relation to the realms of aesthetic questions, politics, identity, religion, complex views of the human body. Students will also cultivate their critical thinking and observational skills in the ways that artists and scholars conceive of human movement as a way of knowing the world.

Students will watch the greatest dancers perform primarily in dance film musicals, stage/television performances, and music videos. Through guided discussions, they will learn how to observe and analyze the choreography of Busby Berkeley, Jerome Robbins, Michael Kidd, Stanley Donen, Gene Kelly, and Bob Fosse, for their contributions of avant-garde films of the postwar period, translations of stage choreography to screen, architectural studies, cartoon animation, music videos.

Drawing on eclectic source materials from different dance genres, the focus of this class will be an examination and observation of dance in film from c. 1928 to the present, including the performances of male dancers Fred Astaire, Gene Kelly, The Nicholas Brothers, Donald O’Connor, Mikhail Baryshnikov, Michael Jackson, and MC Hammer. Female dancers Eleanor Powell, Ginger Rogers, Cyd Charisse, Leslie Caron, Vera Ellen, Ann Miller, and Natalia Osipova will be analyzed. No prior dance experience necessary.

 

Modern Latin American Culture/ Human Rights and Humanities in Latin America
IDH 3100-008
Instructor:  Rachel May
T/R | 3:30pm – 4:45pm
Permit Required
 
This course will begin with an overview of the history of the human rights movement and the international human rights regime.  We will then study human rights in the context of late 20th century Latin American history.  Topics include: the Cold War; Latin America as a fore-runner of the human rights movement, organizations of families of the disappeared, human rights and democratization, transitional justice and memory in Latin America, human rights and neo-liberalism, and human rights and new social movements.  The course will focus on creative writing (fiction and non-fiction), film, and visual art as an important facet of the human rights movement in Latin America, and as a means for understanding a human rights centered worldview.

 

Narrative Medicine
IDH 3100-009
Instructor: Lindy Davidson
M/W | 9:30 – 10:45
Permit Required

Medical institutions rely heavily on lists in order to communicate with and about patients (Browning, 1992), yet Arthur Frank (1995) says that patients find their way through illness by telling their stories. In order to improve understanding about patients’ perspectives of health and illness, their stories must be reclaimed from the diagnostic lists and treatments that dominate patient identities. As medical schools begin to select students based not only on their scientific acumen but also their understanding of the humanities, they are recognizing what Rita Charon (2008) states:

Along with their growing scientific expertise, doctors need the expertise to listen to their patients, to understand as best they can the ordeals of illness, to honor the meanings of their patients’ narratives of illness, and to be moved by what they behold so that they can act on their patients’ behalf (p. 3).

In addition to aiding in their treatment of patients, narrative medicine offers a means for medical practitioners to reflect on difficult cases by exploring their emotions and personal challenges in a career that is marked by significant stress (Roscoe, 2012). Students will read illness narratives and the theoretical background of narrative medicine, develop their own personal narratives of health and illness, and work with others to narrativize their illness experiences.

 

Picture This!
IDH 3100-010
Instructor: Leslie Elsasser
W | 11:00am – 1:45pm
Permit Required

The artistic lens can provide ways of knowing and a means of understanding everyday realities in our rapidly changing and evolving world. In this course, Honors students will train in art exploration and research at USF Contemporary Art Museum with the Andy Warhol Collection. Students will study and explore the wider cultural context from which Andy Warhol emerged, conduct research based on the photographs, prints and other artworks in the USF Contemporary Art Museum collection and look at our current issues through the lens of Andy Warhol’s oeuvre. The arts are powerful tools. They highlight our social contexts, and have a role as a conceptual catalyst that can trigger ideas, stories, conversations, emotions, feelings and mental states. They offer the potential for dialog and to improve tangible skills necessary within emerging interdisciplinary and interprofessional professions, including: enhanced perspective, mindful reflection, empathy, visual literacy, sharpened analytic and diagnostic capabilities, increased tolerance for ambiguity, and improved teamwork and communication. This course encourages student engagement with the Warhol Collectionin recognition of the arts capacity to transform us, to gain a greater perspective, investigate and foster transferable skills through learning how to research, curate, create meaningful dialogue, self-reflect and think critically within all majors and professional disciplines.

 

 

 

 

 

IDH 3350: Natural Sciences

Earth Day at 50
IDH 3350-001
Instructor: Richard C. Bargielski
M/W | 12:30pm – 1:45pm

On April 22, 1970 the first Earth Day protests were held in major cities across the United States. For decades industrial pollution had increasingly become a scourge on national landscapes and people were finally beginning to recognize the harmful effect it ultimately had on human health. Later that year, Richard Nixon created the Environmental Protection Agency to address problems of pollution in society. Since that time, the environmental movement has evolved to encompass an array of concerns including biodiversity, climate change, environmental racism/justice, energy independence, and more. This course will take a critical look at the 50 year history of the U.S. environmental movement since Earth Day. We will begin by reading Rachel Carson’s classic book Silent Spring. We will investigate the different, evolving scientific and technological principles that underlie environmentalist thought and behavior. A key focus of this course is developing a sense of critical interdisciplinarity that addresses environmental science, ethics, and social justice. The course project will be a research paper and presentation on a current environmental issue of personal interest.

How Microbes and People Get Along
IDH 3350-002
Instructor: Steven Specter
T/R | 8:00am - 9:15am

This is an interactive course based on reading articles and discussing in class how microorganisms affect our daily lives. The course will offer an understanding of the scientific method, both common and exotic infections, how our immune systems protect us from infections, and class discussions of the topics that students decide are important. A few sessions will be devoted to current events in microbiology drawn from current popular press. The class will include the opportunity for students to explore in depth topics that are of interest to them using both written and oral reports.

 

Science Fiction, Science Fact
IDH 3350-003
Instructor:  Kevin MacKay
Friday | 9:30am – 12:15pm
 
This is a seminar style course exploring facts and fiction in the astronomy media. We will explore a selection of science fiction movies and novels along with Art and popular culture which has an astronomy basis and we will critique the ideas presented. Students will explore what is fact, what is feasible and what is pure fiction and will have the opportunity to express their learning via a class project which may have a scientific or artistic emphasis.
 

The History and Culture of Science
IDH 3350-004
Instructor: Richard Bargielski
M/W | 2:00pm - 3:15pm

When one thinks about science, their minds often conjure up images of numbers on computers or beakers filled with colored liquids. But science is not an isolated process; it is a social institution and practice conducted by people including you and your professors. In this course we will examine the historical development of science as a social institution, beginning with the philosophical underpinnings of empiricism and ending in the present day. We will use an interdisciplinary perspective that draws readings from anthropology, sociology, history, and science-technology studies (STS) to examine the values, beliefs, and practices that comprise a scientific system of inquiry. We will address key dimensions of the scientific process that often go unnoticed. For example: How do scientists with competing findings settle debates in their field? Why does the scientific method usually require us to start with a hypothesis? What is the difference between hypothetical and theoretical thinking? How are science and technology used to reinforce or advance power structures? A key part of this course will be firsthand experience conducting observations in a scientific lab and interviewing scientists about their work.
 

Geology of National Parks
IDH 3350-005
Instructor: Judy McIlrath
T/R | 9:30am - 10:45am

Why do we have public lands set aside as National Parks? What geologic processes created the variety of landscapes so unique that our predecessors mandated that those landscapes be preserved? In our growing need for natural resources, should we exploit the resources of the parks? Students will have the opportunity to express their learning by researching a national Park of their choice as a term project which may have both a scientific and creative emphasis. An optional field trip to several National Parks, most likely in Arizona, will be a consideration for the enthusiastic! 

 

Interdisciplinary Research in Science
IDH 3350-007
Instructor: Michael Cross
T/R | 9:30am - 10:45am
Permit Required
Course will be offered fully online this semester
 
Natural science is the basis for many applied disciplines including medicine, public health, and engineering. This course uses evidence-based practice, student-centered design, and integrated learning experiences. Regardless of major, you will gain from the methods, practice, and culture of scientific research. This includes literature review, experimental design, and presentation skills required for success in interdisciplinary science research. In addition, you will identify potential research opportunities and meet with researchers in your area of interest.

 

IDH 3400: Social/Behavioral Sciences

More courses coming Soon

The Compassionate City: A Social Autopsy
IDH 3400-001
Instructor: Ulluminair Salim
M/W | 2:00pm - 3:15pm
 
What is a city, and how does emotion influence its development? This course is premised on the notion that cities are people(d).  We ​are cities. We make policies.  We draw boundaries.  We decide who is in and who is out, who is dangerous and who is safe. We design buildings.  We invest money or divest, and we have the capacity to perpetuate harm or cultivate compassion within cityscapes. 
 
While cities often are characterized as bustling epicenters of trade, consumption, development, and creation, they also are spaces rife with conflict and complexity.  This course examines social problems within cities, proposing that we can challenge and erode oppressive structures within them.  
 
Through examination of social issues such as immigration and indigeneity, homelessness and place, imagined communities and so-called dangerous classes, we will identify patterns of (in)compassion and envision new paradigms and structures that give everyone a right to the city.
 
 
Fertility and the Future
IDH 3400-002; [part of the Medical Humanities in a Global Context (MHGC) pathway; open to all Honors students]
Instructor: Holly Donahue Singh
M/W | 2:00pm - 3:15pm
 
This course approaches family-making as a bio-cultural process, addressing claims to the universal and the particular in reproduction. How do gender, class, race, and religion shape reproductive ideals and practices around the world? How do difficulties in reproduction, ranging from infertility and pregnancy loss (miscarriage) to natural disaster and political upheaval, impact those ideals and practices? And how do examinations of fertility from afar through demography, politics, and ethics articulate with intimate, embodied (and dis-embodied) experiences of reproduction, from adoption and abortion to IVF and surrogacy? The course will examine these issues across a variety of geographic contexts and situate local examples within national and global struggles to (re)produce the future.
 

Emotions: Experience, Expression, and Understanding
IDH 3400-003
Instructor: Lisa Zonni Spinazola
T/R | 12:30pm – 1:45pm 

What accounts for the differences in how we understand and experience emotions like guilt, love, shame, joy, gratitude, regret, hope, or anger? Knowledge and expression of emotions are impacted by how we are raised, culture, gender, personalities, style of interaction, and current life stressors. We will extend our understanding of emotions through various lenses and disciplines: psychology, sociology, biology, communication, and social construction. Cognitive Behavioral therapy posits if we change our ways of thinking, we can impact the emotions we feel, and ultimately change behaviors that cause disruption and distress in our lives. Can it be this simple? Paul Ekman studies the universality of emotions, physiological responses to (and causes of) basic or foundational emotional states, as well as the importance of displaying and expressing emotions to the formation and maintenance of interpersonal relationships. Deborah Tannen writes about the origins of, problems that arise, and ways to better understand the gendered language of emotions. Combining photography and electronic journaling with either Tumblr or Instagram, we’ll add texture and visuals to the expression of emotional states we’ll discuss over the course of the semester. For the final project, students will choose a relationship (and its various emotions) or an emotion (through various relationships) to write about and show how their understanding has changed and/or developed over the course of the semester.

 

Political Polarization
IDH 3400-004
Instructor: Patrick Casey
T/R | 12:30pm – 1:45pm

Modern American life has become marked by deep ideological encampment. Decades long trends reveal that more and more people identify as strongly liberal or conservative, with a growing void of contempt between them. The question posed by this course is twofold: how can we explain this increase in political polarization, and what can be done to counter it? This course offers students a chance to put their practical wisdom to the test as we engage with issues relevant to what observers have called the “culture wars”—the politicization of moral and social issues. As this culture war rages there is a dire need for good faith discussions rooted in the practical wisdom that Honors students have been cultivating. This course provides students with the resources and opportunities necessary to learn about the issues that Americans disagree on most strongly and consistently, the sociological and psychological roots of these disagreements, and the perspectives they adopt in evaluating the social and moral order of American society. Additionally, class meetings will offer students a safe space outside the political echo chambers that make up so much of what we are exposed to from media and social media alike, to discuss these issues intelligently with the goal of increasing empathy and reducing polarization.


 
 
Interaction and Influence: Adventures in Sociological Psychology 
IDH 3400-005 
Instructor: David Zeller 
Wednesday | 2:00pm – 3:15pm 
  
A person holds a sign that reads “hungry – anything helps” while standing in the median of a busy road. Protestors chant “no justice, no peace” as they march together toward city hall. How do human beings convince others to take a particular course of action? Sociological psychology is an interdisciplinary field of research that focuses on social interaction and influence. The course explores classical and contemporary research and phenomena related to interaction and influence by focusing on sociologically-informed concepts such as peer pressure, civil inattention, impression management, and framing, among others. Students will apply relevant insights to complex issues to gain a more nuanced understanding of influence-related mechanisms and processes. 
 

Society & Surveillance: How are surveillance technologies altering social life?
IDH 3400-007
Instructor: Wesley Johnson
Thursday | 2:00pm – 4:45pm
Permit Required

This course will explore the question proposed in the title by examining the ways that media and culture interact to produce security, fear, control, vulnerability, and/or empowerment. Some of the areas covered will include social media, systematic monitoring of individuals at schools and workplaces, television systems in public, passenger-screening technologies at airports. Readings will be drawn from the social sciences, science fiction, and popular media. Films will be shown to facilitate inquiry into popular perceptions of surveillance and culture. Ideally, you will cultivate a technological literacy that will allow you to analyze and critique surveillance technologies as social entities.

 
Biopsychosocial Components of Health
IDH 3400-008; [part of the Medical Humanities in a Global Context (MHGC) pathway; open to all Honors students]
Instructor: Melvin James
M/W | 11:00am – 12:15pm
Permit Required [see IDH 3400-010 below for non-permitted section]

This course provides scientific inquiry, reasoning skills and content areas for the Psychological and Social Foundations of Behavior for the new MCAT 2015. In this course, human behavior and illness are viewed from a systemic rather than a reductionist perspective. The combination of biological, psychological and social determinants, and their contributions to behavior and health, is examined from critical analysis and evidence-based problem-solving approaches.


Using Films to Advance Social Policy and Practice
IDH 3400-009
Instructor: Lillian Wichinsky
Wednesday | 5:00 PM – 7:45 PM
 
This course will give students an opportunity to expand their worldview of social policy through the medium of film. Students will explore how political, economic, cultural, religious, historical and environmental factors impact social policies and the delivery of human services in different regions of the world. The geographical context for this course will primarily be North America, Africa, Asia and the Middle East and special emphasis will be given to the social issues created by HIV/AIDS, Poverty, Genocide, Immigration, and War. By examining international models of social policy practice, this course will appeal to students who may have an interest in working with culturally diverse populations in the United States and around the globe.
 
Biopsychosocial Components of Health
IDH 3400-010; [part of the Medical Humanities in a Global Context (MHGC) pathway; open to all Honors students]
Instructor: Melvin James
M/W | 3:30pm – 4:45pm

This course provides scientific inquiry, reasoning skills and content areas for the Psychological and Social Foundations of Behavior for the new MCAT 2015. In this course, human behavior and illness are viewed from a systemic rather than a reductionist perspective. The combination of biological, psychological and social determinants, and their contributions to behavior and health, is examined from critical analysis and evidence-based problem-solving approaches.

 

IDH 3600: Seminar in Ethics

 

Biomedical Ethics
IDH 3600-001; [part of the Medical Humanities in a Global Context (MHGC) pathway; open to all Honors students]
Instructor: John Dormois
T/R | 8:00am – 9:15am

This seminar in applied medical ethics will cover a variety of subjects that will be primarily practical rather than purely philosophical. Topics to be explored include: experimentation on human subjects, access to care, health care disparities, abortion, and the right to die. The primary objective will be to develop a method for approaching ethical issues in medicine. Students will be primarily responsible to leading discussions with minimal formal lecturing.
 
 
Biomedical Ethics
IDH 3600-002; [part of the Medical Humanities in a Global Context (MHGC) pathway; open to all Honors students]
Instructor: John Dormois
T/R | 9:30am - 10:45am
Permit Required

This seminar in applied medical ethics will cover a variety of subjects that will be primarily practical rather than purely philosophical. Topics to be explored include: experimentation on human subjects, access to care, health care disparities, abortion, and the right to die. The primary objective will be to develop a method for approaching ethical issues in medicine. Students will be primarily responsible to leading discussions with minimal formal lecturing. (Permit required for this section only – see Mr. Mejias for details)
 
 
Political Grievances, Populism, Nationalism: Understanding the fight for freedom and liberation through the examination of political speeches and documents
IDH 3600-003
Instructor: Stephanie Williams
M | 5:00pm - 7:45pm
 
This course is designed to cultivate an understanding of how rhetoric, political opinions, and political documents both articulate political grievances inform nations values.  Further, students will read and discuss speeches from historical figures whose grievances challenges the ideals of freedom and who is entitled expand or restrict the expansion of political, social, and economic rights through government institutions and policies.
 
 
Ethics in Medical Research
IDH 3600-004; [part of the Medical Humanities in a Global Context (MHGC) pathway; open to all Honors students]
Instructor: David Diamond
Monday | 2:00 PM – 4:45 PM
 
This course will provide students with guidance toward identifying misinformation and outright deception in health-related research. We will focus on how poorly designed and flawed research has compromised the validity of much of the guidance provided by major health organizations. Each class will involve discussion of examples of how dogmatic views on health issues, including diet, heart disease, diabetes and cancer, have been influenced by philosophical biases and financial conflicts of interest.

 

The American Revolution: Ethics in a Time of World War, 1776
IDH 3600-005
Instructor: Jeffery Donley
T/R | 2:00pm – 3:15pm

This course is a seminar in applied ethics that includes new avenues that set the stage for the ethical lens of the colonial transformation that was caused and became inseparable from the American Revolution, creating a fundamental shift in ethical ideas that still remains today. What made the American War for Independence (1775-1783) revolutionary? Students will investigate whether it was the ethical principle that rights are not the product of human will or historic development are inherent in all human beings by God’s design—a principle reaching back to the arguments of English philosopher John Locke and Scholastic philosopher Thomas Aquinas and explicitly well established as the point of division from the mother country at least fourteen years before the “shot heard round the world?”

We will go on a journey of an interdisciplinary exploration of an “Ethics of Revolution” that integrates the “Just War Theory”of a nationalistic endeavor of honor, raw courage, and self-sufficiency of American exceptionalism manifested in George Washington, Nathaniel Green, Daniel Morgan, Benjamin Franklin, etc. Students will decide if our Founding Fathers made the ethical decision of whether they had “the right to go to war” against Great Britain in that it was just(jus ad bellum) as well as whether the means employed in “the conduct/guidelines of engagement” were ethical (jus in bello).

The ethical principle of “honor” will be thoroughly investigated in this course. Students will analysis, wrestle with, and make conclusions to the following two questions. 1. As British retaliation continued, did people of all classes and means (including women and slaves), feel a slight to their personal honor which provided the ethical argument to break their oaths to King George III? 2. Was this the beginning of the revolutionary movement to elevate the ethic of national honor above personal honor through commitment and sacrifice? Students will read primary sources that will provide them with insights which may be relevant in our current political situation which is experiencing ethical and virtuous challenges across many spectrums.

 

The Power of One: Ethics in 19th Century Global Literature
IDH 3600-006
Instructor: Jeffery Donley
T/R | 3:30pm – 4:45pm

The purpose this course is to critically engage with the global literary masterworks of thought from the nineteenth century concerning the power of one person to affect another, which is a theme that pervades all ethical moral decisions. Great 19thcentury literary masterworks and films made from them have the capacity to make students identify with fictional and non-fictional characters in ways that show possibilities and potential vulnerabilities for themselves. This kind of empathic identification is important for good ethical practice in diverse and global/pluralistic communities.

Students will analyze the ethical themes of the following 19thcentury masterworks and films made from them: from England Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol(1843), H.G. Wells’ The Time Machine(1895) and Oscar Wilde’s Picture of Dorian Gray(1890), from America Herman Melville’s Moby Dick(1851), Louis May Alcott’s Little Women(1868/69), and Harriet Ann Jacobs’ Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl(1861), from Russia Fyodor Dostoevsky’s The Karamazov Brothers(1879/80), from France Victor Hugo’s Les Miserable (1862) and Jules Verne’s 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea(1864), from Germany Johann Wolfgang von Goethe’s Faust(1806/29), from Scotland Sir Walter Scott’s Ivanhoe(1819), and from Japan Higuchi Ichiyo’s Takekurabe(1895/96).

Throughout the semester, students will learn Global ethical issues from multiple geographical perspectives that bring about an increased awareness of the implication of literature in the operations of power and ideology such as: poverty, the homeless, the orphaned, greed, determinism, social justice/human rights, class conflicts, the existential theme of the meaning of life, justice/injustice, prostitution, human rights, thievery, political resistance, free will, obsession, revenge, the limits of knowledge, good vs. evil, the supremacy of youth & beauty, innocence, appearances, sexual harassment and abuse, art & morality, the negative exercise of influence, anti-semitism, forgiveness and the “other,” identity, change, technology and modernization, female independence versus submission, the role of women.
The focus of this seminar-style course will be one of reading, reflection, writing, collaborative inquiry, and discussion of an authentic ethical understanding and appreciation of the inter-dynamics of the diversified multi-layered global facets of the literary masterworks of the 19thcentury.


Physicians of the Soul: Medicine, Philosophy, and the Good Life
IDH 3600-007; [part of the Medical Humanities in a Global Context (MHGC) pathway; open to all Honors students]
Instructor: Benjamin Scott Young
T/R | 11:00am – 12:15pm

The origins of medicine and philosophy are deeply connected. This is true not only in the Western traditions, but in many cultural and intellectual settings throughout the world. Moreover, not only is the historical development of philosophy and medicine inseparably interwoven, but they share a common motivation—and so also a common intellectual and emotional pattern. This motivation might best be expressed simply as “care for well-being.” Medicine cares for the well-being of the body and philosophy cares for the well-being of thoughts, beliefs, and experience. Both traditions struggle to articulate what “well-being” means for human beings—body and mind—and both develop methods and procedures by which to remedy and avoid identifiable pathologies and errors.

Furthermore, like the analogy that Plato’s Socrates draws in Protagoras, whereby he imagines the similarities between those who care for the body—physicians—and those who care for the soul—philosophers (i.e., “physicians of the soul”)—the one who participates in the cultivation of culture might be thought of as a “physician of culture.” Both the body and the mind are experienced through the inherited cultural constellation of ideas, practices, and concerns that have shaped our lives from birth. To examine, compare, appreciate, and critique these inherited cultural ideas participates too in that same care for well-being.

Despite having been “thrown,” as it were, into an always already on-going constellation of cultural traditions, each of us is also always in the position to evaluate these, select some, discard others, and create still more. This process of evaluation and creativity with regards to the question of what sort of life is most worth of our love and striving might be summed up as: the question and quest for the good life. Therefore, our aim in this course is, ultimately, to draw on both philosophy and medicine—historical and contemporary—to enable us cultivate answers to the everyday practical and existential question about what it means for each of us to live a good and choiceworthy life with regards to mind, body, and culture.


 

 

IDH 4200: Geographical Perspectives

More courses coming soon

Global and Multicultural Perspectives
IDH 4200-001
Instructor: Bárbara C. Cruz
T/R | 11:00am -12:15pm
 
Shift happens! As the United States and the world continues to change in unprecedented ways, how do these changes and shifts impact our daily lives?  This course will examine the major issues, practices, and controversies surrounding global and multicultural perspectives in our society.  Students will become conversant in these topics and consider global and multicultural perspectives in their lives, fields of study, and future professions. Special attention will be given to the U.S. and Latin America and the Caribbean.
 

Experience Japan - from Hospitals to Hospitality (Omotenashi)
IDH 4200-002; [part of the Medical Humanities in a Global Context (MHGC) pathway; open to all Honors students]
Instructor: Atsuko Sakai
T/R | 2:00pm -3:15pm
 
What does it mean and what does it take to “care” for others? This course asks these basic questions through explorations of Japan. Throughout its history Japan has fought to survive natural disasters, famines and disease in addition to the fighting between Samurais to unite the country’s leadership. The customary practices—extending from daily habits (such as taking a bath or drinking tea) to superstitious rituals—often came from the fear of sickness, hope for a cure, and prayer. We will study the history of Japan and examine various artifacts (literature, arts, designed objects and spaces, etc.), which reflect these customary practices and beliefs from different time periods.  Modern Japan also faces serious social issues including suicide, overwork, unbalanced demographics due to low birth rates, and negative environmental effects associated with industrialization, natural disasters, and war. While these current issues are not unknown to other countries, there are some public health systems and services unique to Japan such as a Mother-Child Pocketbook. Thus, we will analyze the “caring” system in Japan from various perspectives including medical, health, nursing, and childcare. 
 
 
#Hashtag Global Activism: The Politics and Dynamics of Social Movements
IDH 4200-003
Instructor:  Cam Silver
T/R | 12:30pm - 1:45am
Permit Required
 
#Kony2012 #Fake News #BLM, #Loveislove, #IIcantbreathe, and etc are just a few examples of modern social movements. This class will examine the processes of collective action in Social Movements. This course will investigate social movements from collective action from domestic and international perspectives. The course will focus on the hitherto success and failure of social movements: waves of feminism, the civil rights movement, and the LGBTQ+ movement. Students will learn the many methods of successful social movements such as peaceful protesting, sit-in’s, acts of civil disobedience, and riots. The transdisciplinary academic boundaries of Global Social Movements combine and draw from sociology, political science, and anthropology. From the use of case studies, students will comparatively be able to understand issues in the power of the social problems (not to be limited) such as police brutality that has resulted in collective action that resulted in the Egyptian Revolution from the 2020 unrest around the globe.
 

Sub-Saharan Africa
IDH 4200-004
Instructor: Fenda Akiwumi
T/R | 9:30am -10:45am

This course will look at culture, societies and development in Sub-Saharan Africa in historical and contemporary context. It will be a broad interdisciplinary introduction to the study of this part of the African continent. Africa's history, politics, cultures, and societies are rich, diverse, and complex yet generalizations and negative stereotypes about Africa by the media, academics, and policy-makers are common (apocalyptic scenarios of civil war, poverty, famine, diseases such as AIDS and failed states, for example). Using selected case studies we will explore political, economic, and socio-cultural characteristics of both modern and traditional Africa and through critical evaluation of course materials obtain a more balanced portrayal of the continent and its development.
 

Arab Literature, Culture, and Film​
IDH 4200-005
Instructor:  Raja Benchekroun
T/R | 9:30am – 10:45am
 
This course is an introduction to Arab Literature, Culture, and Film. Students will be introduced to new Arab perspectives and principles in today's Middle East and North Africa, from social and family values in everyday life, gender roles, education and an overview of religious and political affiliations. The course will provide an equitable amount of past and contemporary views, influential writers, speakers, novelists and musicians in the Middle East and North Africa. We will similarly cover the challenges that Arabs are facing to identify as a Muslim, Arab Muslim, and Arab Non-Muslim in today's world.  There are invisible barriers that are shielding us from seeking knowledge, facts about each other (whether as Arabs or non-Arabs). 
 

Post-WW2 History, Television, and Global Political Events
IDH 4200-006
Instructor:  Dan Ruth
Thursday | 9:30am – 12:15pm
 
This class explores post World War II history as seen through the camera’s lens. Students will follow and explore many pivotal moments from the early 1950s through the present day and how they were covered, first by the earliest days of television to the explosion of present-day technology and advanced social media. This course will discuss the Army/McCarthy hearings of the 1950s, the Kennedy/Nixon presidential debates, the Kennedy assassination, Vietnam, the civil rights movement, the Iraq wars, presidential scandals, the Iranian hostage crisis, as well as Brexit and how each of these historic moments not only were viewed through the lens, but how the camera influenced the public’s understanding of them.   

Globalization and Cultural Pluralism
IDH 4200-007
Instructor: Linda Tavernier-Almada
M/W | 3:30-4:45 PM

Around the globe, traditional cultural beliefs guide much of human behavior. Various aspects of traditional cultural beliefs and norms inform the everyday decisions of average citizens, world leaders, CEOs, and other people of influence. The impact that traditional beliefs have on the behavior of people across the globe is often not understood by most Americans. Typically, aside from the superficial information that they get from their TVs or short tourist trips, most Americans are completely unfamiliar with the fundamental cultural concepts that guide the behaviors of people in other countries. Yet, because we now live in a global society, it is crucial that we understand which cultural traditions and beliefs are motivating the people in the communities and markets that are intertwined around the globe. In this course, students will become cultural pluralistsby developing the skill sets needed to identify a broad range of international cultural norms and beliefs.

Cultural Identity and Social Class
IDH 4200-008
Instructor: Linda Tavernier-Almada
M/W | 5:00-6:15 PM

The fight for social capital within social class structures can be brutal if the group trying to achieve the desired social status is culturally different from the dominant group. In turn, the exclusion of a group from standard avenues of social mobility can create such devastating consequences for the marginalized group that it creates and foments a counterculture. Using readings from various fields of study and select films from around the world, we will look at the struggles for sociocultural status taking place across the globe. Through an interdisciplinary lens, we will look at groups like the street children of Brazil, the Untouchables of India, the teenage Muslims in France, the woman of Afghanistan, etc. Our goal will be to advance solutions for some of the real-world problems we discover during the semester. 

Women in the Middle East
4200-009
Instructor:  Jawad Nazek
T/R | 3:30pm – 4:45pm
 
Women have been central to the political history between the Middle East and the West. The region of the Middle East has been perceived and understood by the West through gender relations and gender representations. This course is set to examine the gendered representations of the Middle East and analyze the political implications of such representations. The course offers a systematic reading of how the political and cultural structures of both colonialism and anti-colonialist nationalist movements informed feminine and masculine identities. The inter-dynamics of Islamism, globalization, and neoliberalism in various countries in the region, including, Egypt, Iran, Turkey, and Iraq will be discussed, in addition to the role of women in social movements and recent uprisings.
 

Contemporary Middle East: Political Challenges in a Global Age
4200-010
Instructor:  Jawad Nazek
T/R | 2:00pm – 3:15pm
 
Recently, the Middle East is conceived as a region that breeds fundamentalism and an area of long-lasting conflicts. Due to the distorted notions and misrepresentations of the Middle East circulated and promoted in corporate media, and in conventional media outlets as well, this course is set into a great mission. This course aims to provide students with an authentic understanding of the diversified multi-layered facets of the Middle East, and to expose them to the breadth of Middle Eastern cultures, and their political and cultural landmarks within historical and contemporary contexts. This course discusses the main social, economic, and political developments in the Middle East from the 19th century onward. Topics to be covered include, but are not limited to: colonial legacies; Islamic Sharia Laws, identity politics, social movements, Arab uprisings, women and politics in the Middle East, terrorism, and development. Besides, this course also highlights the Middle East abundant culture, and introduces students to countless contributions of Middle East countries to human civilizations in wide range of areas, including science, arts, architecture, and music. The aim of this course is to broaden students' intellectual perspective by introducing them to the geography, history, politics, political economy, culture, and arts of the Middle East. Another equally important goal of this course is to impart appreciation of cultures other than their own, by introducing them to the diversified cultures of the Middle East. 
 

Financialization: Cross-Cultural Perspectives
IDH 4200-011
Instructor:  Olubukola Olayiwola
M/W | 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
 
When one thinks about financialization, what comes to one’s mind is the constellation of global financial-economic activities in the hands of “smart” experts in Wall Street. However, the concept of financialization has become so critical in neoliberal capitalism such that anthropologists have approached it differently. One of the major ways of achieving a wider coverage (macroscopic institutional and structural factors essential in understanding financialization) cross-culturally is to make “the familiar strange” (i.e. demystifying Wall Street, regime of accumulation, and shareholder value orientation) and make “the strange familiar” by directing our searchlight to often taken-for-granted financial activities in everyday lives of market vendors and petty commodity producers who inhabit the informal economic sector particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. In this course, we will examine the development of the concept of financialization drawing from different fields in social sciences. We will critique the concept of financialization including its limits (analytic, theoretical, strategic, optic and empiric limits). We will debate various international development issues and anthropology of development including those rooted in global capitalism and neoliberalism (e.g., microfinance). And we will link our discussion to major anthropological debates on the informal and formal economic sectors. Having drawn from different ethnographic pieces, we will suggest essential components of everyday lives and livelihood, which must be factored in to understand what constitutes financialization, be it at the level of household, community, and state.   
 

Comedy in a Global Context
4200-012
Instructor: David Jenkins
T/R | 2:00PM – 3:15 PM
 
From the plays of Aristophanes to Sacha Baron Cohen's This is America comedy has been been used as a form of entertainment and a tool for critique. This course takes both a global and historical approach to how comedy works (or doesn't). Students will develop a firm theoretical foundation before examining specific comedic artifacts from the past and present. This course draws on continental philosophy, communication theory, performance studies, sociology, and theater studies. Comedy is fraught, the idea that it's all "just jokes" doesn't remove the potential for unintended consequences, and so by examining it from multiple perspectives students will develop a deeper understanding and appreciation for the greater world we inhabit.
 
Music, Nationalism, and (Post)Colonialism in South Asia
4200-013
Instructor: Angsumala Tamang
Friday | 2:00-4:45 PM

If global politics in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries marked the effects of European colonialism in South Asia, the second half of the twentieth century and twenty-first century are often characterized as belonging to an era of post-colonialism. Post-colonialism, of course implies that the struggle for national liberation from colonial rule has been "successful" and that the formerly colonized "state" and its people are now independent of foreign control. However, does it mean that the centuries of imposed imperial rule and cultural dominance ends with the formation of an independent nation-state? Or, does the colonial legacy continues via processes of nation-building, music-making, gender relations, and culture works that underpin colonial theories within complex juxtaposition of socio-historical associations and traditional hierarchies? Starting with South Asia – India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka – we will travel onwards to Southeast Asia via Myanmar, Vietnam, Cambodia, Indonesia, and the Philippines. The readings will focus on theoretical discussions and critical thinking with the objective of stimulating interdisciplinary understanding of postcolonial realities in terms of music performance, music production, and film studies in relation to the politics of representation – region, religion, language, gender, class and caste. No prior technical knowledge of music or musical terms is required for this course.

Access to Justice Around the World
IDH 4200-014
Instructor: Alma Dedic
T/R | 11:00am – 12:15pm
 
People need protection from possible harm inflicted on them. All of us can find ourselves in harmful situations, especially when we engage in disputes or conflicts of interest. In these situations, we start looking into actions or remedies we can use to redress the harm. When remedies are guaranteed by law, they are called legal remedies. Legal remedies involving a third party such as a legal institution lead to resolving disputes mostly through compensation or restitution. The ability of people to access and seek remedies through different mechanisms is the main concern of the Access to Justice concept. In this course we will look into this concept and its relationship to social justice. This relationship can be examined from different perspectives such as equal or unequal opportunities, privileges, and economic justice. We will also study different models of access to justice and human rights standards that are linked to them, in particular as seen through the lens of recent events around the world – how did they shape access to justice and human rights in general? Students will have an opportunity to learn about human rights protection in the country and around the world through specific case studies, facilitated discussions, forums and student led workshops.

Health and History
IDH 4200-015 [part of the Medical Humanities in a Global Context (MHGC) pathway, open to all Honors students]
Instructors: Michael Decker & Andrea Vianello
T/R | 12:30pm – 1:45pm

Health care has for centuries been a major concern of societies around the globe. From the rituals of ancient Mesopotamia, the medical texts of ancient Egypt, the insights on Roman medicine provided by Pompeii and the epidemics and pandemics that have been recorded since the Middle Ages, to the beginnings of scientific medicine, the history of health provides an exciting perspective with lessons valid even today. As humans change the environment ever more and reach unprecedented demographic levels, old and new foes return: diseases previously considered defeated adapt and (re-) emerge, creating widespread disruption.

Using a scientific approach within archaeology and history, the course will present an innovative and up-to-date history of the world focusing on health. We will emphasize a transdisciplinary deep history and evolutionary approach towards pathogens. The course stems from a research project based in Venice, Italy, on the first quarantine in the world, trying to reconstruct the epidemics and pandemics of the last 600 years. Upon completion of the course, students in any discipline will be better equipped to understand and contend with new health challenges.

 

IDH 4950: Honors Capstone (NEW LISTING: See section 006)

 

Reproductive Health, Rights, and Justice
IDH 4950-001
Instructor: Holly Donahue Singh
Tuesday | 2:00pm - 4:45pm
 
This course examines contemporary social movements around reproductive health, rights, and justice in global historical contexts. The historical and cross-cultural examination of debates about, and advocacy around, reproduction will ground students' research into current medical, legislative, and social reform movements aimed at changing the ways people imagine human futures and work to create them through policy, education, and activism. Students' research will serve as the basis for creating their own projects aimed at increasing public understanding of their topics in the form of a public event, a podcast, an exhibition, a website, a course syllabus, a documentary, or another form.
 

Leadership in the Back Loop
IDH 4950-002
Instructor: Alan Bush
Friday | 9:30am - 12:15pm
 
May you live in interesting times: ecological collapse, political upheaval, social change, economic upheaval. Predictions of each expect that life for Gen Z is going to be characterized conditions that are volatile, paths that will be uncertain, moral choices that will be ambiguous. We are entering what is termed in Complexity Science as the Back Loop, a period of release & reconfiguration.  It will be rough. And, the possibility of building far more fulfilling lives and more vibrant society and lives than your parents experienced is possible. 


The meaning and styles of effective leadership changes in the Back Loop.  The study of resilient communities & effective organizations in dynamic markets reveals that leadership is better thought of as a property that emerges from relationships, not people.  In complexity, “we” can lead, not I.  This course will introduce you to first the science and then the art of leading in complexity, help you develop the habits of mind and action of an effective leader during changing times, and offer settings to practice. This course is for students that are interested in explore non-traditional ways to inhabit leadership, particularly if traditional conceptions of leadership do not speak to you.
 

Visual Narratives: Tampa's Stories and Histories
IDH 4950-003
Instructor: Tamara Nemirovsky
Friday | 9:30 AM – 12:15 PM

An exploration of how to produce a short documentary to re-tell the stories of our community in a meaningful and reflective way. Emphasis is on history of the media, documentary/film language, concept development, narrative structures as well as all the production stages (pre-production, production, post-production) and technical aspect required to produce a documentary.

Creativity and Innovation
IDH 4950-004
Instructor: Michael Cross
Thursday | 2:00pm – 4:45pm
 
Learn about innovation and creativity directly from world-class innovators. In this capstone experience, you will have the opportunity to hear first-hand experiences about inventions such as lasik-surgery, evidence-based medicine, and low-loss optical fiber. You will work on a culminating project with mentorship by faculty of the Institute for Advance Discovery and innovation.

 

Civic Literacy and Public Discourse
IDH 4950-005
Instructor: Dan Ruth
Tuesday | 9:30am – 12:15pm

This class is designed to give students an enhanced understanding of world events and civic institutions that influence their lives. Having a better grasp of swirling news events and the confidence to be able to articulate their importance is essential to becoming a more engaged citizen. To that end, students will be required to read both the Tampa Bay Times and New York Times, as well as follow other information platforms such as broadcast and cable news outlets, NPR and social media. This course will also include a weekly news quiz. Students will also participate in weekly team presentations exploring in depth some aspect of current news events and/or various civic institutions. It is said that journalism often represents the first draft of history. The goals of this class are two-fold. First, students will become better informed and thus more aware of stories that will help form their world view. Second, students will also gain a keener understanding of the journalistic challenges associated with bringing the news to the public’s attention.

Perspectives in Performing Arts Healthcare [MHGC]
IDH 4950-006
Instructor: Nancy Burns
F | 9:30am – 12:15pm

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the physical and mental health issues of performing artists as a vulnerable and underserved population and explore evidence-based solutions to advance the health care and health access to this population. This course will be useful to future healthcare providers, performers and educators. Completion of the course will leave students with specific knowledge and empathetic approach to caring for performing artists that can translate into caring for general population.

Transitional Justice
IDH 4950-007
Instructor: Alma Dedic
T/R | 12:30pm – 1:45pm
 
In the realm of international politics, countries in transition from an authoritarian regime to democracy or from war to peace often face multiple transitions and different challenges, for instance the challenge of overcoming past abuses of human rights such as political executions, ethnic cleansing or mass murder. Such societies at times reach for transitional justice mechanisms to redress past atrocities and human rights violations. Transitional justice mechanisms consist of judicial and non-judicial measures, including truth-seeking mechanisms, reparation programs and institutional reforms. This complex set of measures if applied in counties in transition can offer reconciliatory elements for grieving and often divided societies on their path to democracy and global trends.

This course will offer an exploration of Transitional Justice mechanisms using real-life examples and experiences from around the world. Yet, together we will reach even further and look into our own society and communities we live in. What can we learn from societies in transition? Can we apply such measures and experiences in our own society and communities? In this course students will practice how to bridge the gap between academic concepts, and real-life project design and implementation in complex environment (such as conflict sensitive and/or divided communities) using problem solving approaches and tools such as visual material. This course may be of particular interest to students in the field of law, politics, international relations, psychology, sociology, criminology, planning, history, and ethics. Through a series of thematic sessions, case studies, workshops, round table and focus group discussions from human right and political perspectives this course is designed to also enhance students' critical thinking, teamwork and problem-solving skills. 

Sustainability for Engineers
IDH 4950-008
Instructor: Kebreab Ghebremichael
Tuesday | 8:00am – 10:45am

Description: The Code of Ethics for Engineers explains how the profession, "has a direct and vital impact on the quality of life for all people." In this course, we will examine the concept of sustainable engineering. We will use systems thinking to explore interdependencies in the three pillars of sustainability (social, economic, and environment), and develop engineering solutions driven by trade-offs between these pillars. We will use case studies to help define what a 'sustainable engineering' project is. This course will then use social science field methods to demonstrate how engineers can develop culturally appropriate projects by engaging community members/organizations throughout a project's lifecycle.

Quality makes ¢ent$: Healthcare Research & Quality Outcomes
IDH 4950-009
Instructor: Donna Ettel
Tuesdays | 2:00pm – 4:45pm
 
What ethical and legal obligations do hospitals have to patients? What challenges and issues arise while conducting healthcare quality projects? How are quality of care and cost of delivery related? Using literature (Foucault's The Birth of the Clinic, Gawande's Better: A Surgeon's Notes on Performance, and others) and film (The English Surgeon, Malice, and others), this course purposes to instill the knowledge of community needs through cultural enlightenment, interdisciplinary practices, and real-life experience. This course will primarily focus on clinical outcomes, process change, and emphasizes analysis of the patient care process to identify specific interventions. 

How to Make History
IDH 4950-701  (course cross-listed with IDH 4000-602)
Instructor: Catherine Wilkins
F 9:30-12:15
Location: Off-campus

In 1963, Martin Luther King, Jr. wrote that “We are made by history,” emphasizing the importance of historical events and narratives in constructing our understanding of the world and ourselves. Many of us might think of History – the academic discipline - as little more than a sequence of objective facts, a chronological list of important names, dates, and battles. In reality, history – as a lived experience – is much more personal and intimate. It is experienced every day, by every individual. Events, from the mundane to momentous, are experienced and remembered by people, recorded by some, and passed along to future generations, hopefully for their edification. This course will focus on how History might shape our identity as residents of the Tampa Bay area, with an emphasis on the process by which History is made, and the role that we might play – as students, researchers, and practitioners – in making history ourselves. In partnership with the St. Pete Beach Public Library, the Gulf Beaches Historical Museum, and the Pinellas Memory project, this Honors Capstone course will provide students with hands-on experience in: recording oral histories, producing documentary photography, digitizing visual and print artifacts, cataloguing and creating a historical archive, and developing an exhibition/program of their work. Our goal will be to digitize and add to the collection of the Gulf Beaches Historical Museum, and to contribute our work to the Pinellas Memory online archive of historical artifacts. This is a service learning course, meaning that we integrate community service with guided reflection into the curriculum to enhance and enrich student learning of course material. PLEASE NOTE: About half of the classes during the semester take place off-campus, on beautiful Pass-a-Grille beach in Pinellas County. Off-campus classes begin promptly at 9:30 and last until 12:15. Students must provide their own transportation and ensure that they leave enough time in their schedule for travel.

 

Connections: Mental Healthcare, Community Engagement, and Art
IDH 4950.702
Instructor: Catherine Wilkins
Day/Time: W 2:00-4:45 PM
Location: Off-campus

In this collaboration between the USF Honors College and the Tampa Museum of Art, Honors students learn about medical conditions such as dementia, depression, substance use disorder, and PTSD and are trained to facilitate interactions with works of art for patient groups dealing with these diagnoses.  Students will learn how to deliver therapeutic interactions with art that allow participants to give their own personal interpretations without fear of judgment or failure.  The methods utilized in class have been found to help patients access and express memories, improve communication skills, externalize emotions, relieve stress and anxiety, and promote positive feelings. This class will also instruct students in the practices of observation, deep listening, and critical thinking, build empathy and understanding, and engage students with the community.  This capstone course will allow students to participate in furthering the research in these areas by providing an immersive experience at the intersection of art, medicine, and mental health.  Please note that this class meets at the Tampa Museum of Art – allow time for traveling back and forth when you are planning your schedule. Transportation is not provided. Due to high demand, an application process is used to select students for this course. For full consideration, students should apply by March 27; decisions will be given by March 29. APPLY HERE: https://goo.gl/forms/1gpVC5MZ9rz5Ysmm1

 

IDH 4970: Honors Thesis

Coming Soon