Academic Programs

Coastal Sustainability Concentration

Important Degree Changes for Fall 2018 Affecting Current Students:

The Coastal Sustainability concentration and corresponding graduate certificates will no longer be accepting new students after Spring 2018.

Students currently enrolled in the Coastal Sustainability concentration or certificates have the option to change their concentration of study or select from the following courses to complete their degree requirements:

    • EVR 6216 - Water Quality Policy and Management
    • IDS 6223 - Waste Not, Want Not: Reconsidering Waste, Re-purposing Wasted Resources
    • IDS 6246 - Water Sensitive Urban Design for Sustainable Communities
    • IDS 6247 - Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation
    • OCE 6085 - Ocean Policy

 

Concentration Description:

The Coastal Sustainability Concentration exposes students to the reality that maintaining the quality of life and benefits that the ocean has provided to humankind while sustaining the integrity of ocean ecosystems, requires changes in how we view, plan, manage, govern and use ocean resources and coastal areas. Students will be prepared for public and private sector employment and leadership positions in the areas of land use planning, real estate development, coastal resource management, hazard mitigation planning and floodplain management, emergency planning management and civic organizations.

 

If you would like to sponsor please click here. 

 

Concentration Director: 



Louis Zunguze

Faculty & Coordinator of
Coastal Sustainability Concentration

Dr Zunguze

 

Concentration Courses (9 credit hours)

Choose three: 

  • IDS 6240 - Sustainable Coastal Planning: Concepts and Principles (3)

The course provides an overview of land use planning, introduces sustainable/smart growth principles and provide specific development concepts for coastal and waterfront communities. The course will define and explain coastal resilience. It will introduce cover a holistic approach to what makes a community resilient, including such factors as social capital and sense of place. The course will also explore the societal context of land use planning and proposes a model for understanding and reconciling the divergent priorities among competing stakeholders; it explains how to build sustainable planning support systems to assess current and future conditions, evaluate policy choices, create visions, and compare scenarios; and it sets forth a methodology for creating plans that will influence future land use change.

*This course is available on-campus and online.
*Course number may differ from the USF Class Schedule Search.

  • IDS 6241 - Sustainable Coastal Planning: Strategies & Implementation (3)

The course provides has a strong design-oriented approach focusing on how to create Sustainable Coastal Plans and explaining each major step with examples from various localities. It links each step to current planning practice and to new theory in landscape ecology and sustainable development. The course will provide a framework of sustainable land use planning and proposes a model for preparing and implementing plans within a context of divergent priorities among competing stakeholders; it will show how to build sustainable planning support systems to assess current and future conditions, evaluate policy choices, create visions, and compare scenarios; and set forth a methodology for creating plans that will influence future land use change.

*This course is available on-campus and online.
*Course number may differ from the USF Class Schedule Search.

  • IDS 6247 - Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation (3)

This course will use an interdisciplinary approach to explore climate vulnerability, and pathways of climate mitigation and adaption. Case studies will be reviewed to provide insight on climate change adaption planning and societal resilience. This course is offered both online and on-campus.

*This course is available on-campus and online.
*Course number may differ from the USF Class Schedule Search.

  • OCE 6085 - Ocean Policy (3)

Learn about the community of people involved in marine affairs; the use of the sea and coast; current technology and the major policy issues related to the technology trends, and identify multiple sources of information available to students.

*This course is only available on-campus.

 

On successful completion of this program, participants should be able to: 

  • Understand the principles and concept of sustainable/smart growth for coastal communities
  • Describe the primary drivers that influence growth and development patterns
  • Recognize social, environmental impacts and benefits of various development patterns
  • Understand and explain complex environmental issues, including climate change, and examine current sustainability efforts
  • Assess the current state of growth and development in coastal communities
  • Employ "best practices" resources and tools, such as mapping and zoning techniques to further alternative sustainable planning and growth efforts in coastal areas
  • Communicate effectively about coastal planning and development
  • Relate sustainable coastal planning and development to divergent development priorities among competing stakeholders
  • Understand how to build sustainable planning support systems to assess current and future conditions, evaluate policy choices, create visions, and compare scenarios for coastal communities

For more information about this concentration, please contact the PCGS Academic Programs Director,

Randall Pape
rpape@usf.edu