Program

Courses

Educational Psychology Course Descriptions

Undergraduate Level

  • EDF 3122 Learning and the Developing Child (3 credits)
    EDF 3122 is an introductory course designed to acquaint students with the major theories and research in educational psychology. The major goal is for students to learn to apply theories and research to situations with children in everyday life. The course provides an overview of physical, cognitive, and social-personality development through the pre-adolescent period. Classroom management techniques and the characteristics of effective classroom instruction are also taught. A student in this class will learn to recognize others’ theoretical perspectives and will better understand why different educators recommend different types of educational programs. The catalog description is as follows: “Preadolescent child growth and development, learning theory, and behavioral analysis applied to instruction and to the organization and management of the classroom.”
    Offered: Every semester

  • EDF 3214 Human Development and Learning (3 credits)
    EDF 3214 is an introductory course designed to acquaint students with the major theories and research in human development and learning. The major goal is for students to learn to apply theories and research in situations with children in daily life. The course provides an overview of neurological, cognitive, and social-personality development during the adolescent period. The course also provides an overview of various theories of learning, as well as the role of motivation and emotion in learning. Characteristics of effective classroom learning and instruction in light of student development and learning are also taught. A student in this class will learn to recognize others’ theoretical perspectives and will better understand why different educators recommend different types of educational programs. The catalog description of the class is as follows: “Overview of developmental and learning theories and application to effective classroom learning and instruction.”
    Note: This course is required for Secondary Education students.
    Offered: Every semester (face to face, sometimes offered online)

  • EDF 3228 Human Behavior and Environmental Selection (3 credits)
    EDF 3228 is an elective course designed to provide students with knowledge about a broad range of commonly applied theories in the behavioral and social sciences. A student in this class will learn to recognize theoretical perspectives, and determine the need and rational for various behavioral methods. Through critical examination of various theories students will gain an appreciation for the inherent strengths, complexities and variations of human behavior and learning as well its reciprocal relationship with the environment. Students will acquire and advance their skills in applying commonly used theories in the behavioral sciences to real-life scenarios and their respective career fields. This course does not count as the Educational Psychology course (e.g. EDF3122, EDF3214 and EDF4124) required for teacher certification. The catalog description is as follows: “Learning principles, behavior analysis applied to global environmental and social issues.”
    Offered: Every semester (online)

  • EDF 4124 Child Growth and Learning (3 credits)
    EDF 4124 is an introductory course designed to acquaint students with the major theories and research in child development.  The major goal is for students to learn to apply theories and research to situations with young children in everyday life and to make good educational decisions in the classroom.  The course provides an overview of physical/motor development, cognitive development, and social/emotional development through the third grade in order to help students provide age appropriate instruction.  The course also addresses individual differences and the effects of providing a meaningful context for learning in order to provide instruction that is both individually and culturally appropriate.  The catalog description is as follows: “An introduction to child development and learning from an educational and psychological perspective. Emphasis is on the application of relevant constructs as they would reflect developmentally appropriate practices in early childhood learning settings.”
    Note: This course is required for Early Childhood students.
    Offered: Every fall semester (fall: face to face, spring: online)

  • EDP 3273 Learning and Development within a School Context (3 credits)
    EDP 3273 is an introductory course designed to acquaint students with developmental theories and research that can be applied within a school context. The major goal is for students to learn to apply theories and research to situations with children in schools. The course provides an overview of cognitive development, as well as learning, social, and moral development theories, with emphasis on elementary school age children. Classroom management techniques and characteristics of effective classroom instruction also are taught.  Students learn why it is important to consider individual differences and needs in designing curricula, and how to use data to make instructional decisions. Students in this class will learn to recognize others’ theoretical perspectives and will better understand why different educators recommend different types of educational programs.
    Note: This course is required for Elementary Education students.
    Offered: Every fall and spring semester (face to face)

  • EDP 3271 Child Development within a School Context (1 credit)
    EDP 3271 is the first course in a series of courses designed to acquaint students in special education with the cognitive developmental theories and research that can be applied within a school context. The major goal is for students to learn to apply theories and research to situations with children in schools. The course provides an overview of cognitive development, with emphasis on elementary school age children. EDP 3271 is one of three one-credit courses that are required for the Special Education program. Collectively, these courses meet teacher certification requirements and the teaching competency requirements in the State of Florida Department of Education program approval statute. The content of these courses provide the background knowledge in psychology that is essential to the teaching competencies expected of prospective teachers and others who work with children. Concurrent or subsequent program courses and field experiences build upon the knowledge and understanding acquired in this course.
    Note: This course is required for Special Education students.
    Offered: Every fall semester (online)

  • EDP 3272 Learning within a School Context (1 credit)
    EDP 3272 is the second course in a series of courses designed to acquaint students in special education with the major theories and research in educational psychology. The major goal of this series of courses is for students to learn to apply theories and research to situations with children in schools. This particular course places emphasis on brain development and learning. Classroom management techniques and characteristics of effective classroom instruction also are taught. In addition, the course provides an overview of social and moral development theories. The periods from preschool to middle school are emphasized. Students learn why it is important to consider individual differences and needs in designing curriculum, and how to use data to make instructional decisions. EDP 3272 is one of the three one-credit courses that is required for the Special Education program. Collectively, these courses meet teacher certification requirements and the teaching competency requirements in the State of Florida Department of Education program approval statute. The content provides background knowledge in psychology that is essential to the teaching competencies expected of prospective teachers and others who work with children. Concurrent or subsequent program courses and field experiences build upon the knowledge and understanding acquired in this course. The content and assignments for this course are integrated with students’ other courses during the semester it is taught.
    Note: This course is required for Special Education students.
    Offered: Every spring semester (online)

  • EDP 4275 Enhancing Children’s Learning and Development within a School Context (1 credit)
    EDP 4275 is the third and last course in a series of courses designed to help students learn and apply theories and research in educational psychology to real situations with children in a school context, with an emphasis on elementary and middle school age children. A student in this class is expected to apply different theoretical perspectives to instructional design and to have a deeper understanding of why different educators may recommend different types of educational programs to support students’ learning and development. Finally, students will learn why it is important to consider individual differences and needs in designing curriculum and how to use data to make instructional decisions. EDP 4275 is one of three 1-credit courses that are required for the Special Education Program. Collectively, these courses meet teacher certification requirements and the teaching competency requirements in the State of Florida Department of Education program approval statute. The content of these courses provide the background knowledge in psychology that is essential to the teaching competencies expected of prospective teachers and others who work with children. Concurrent or subsequent program courses and field experiences build upon the knowledge and understanding acquired in this course.
    Note: This course is required for Special Education students.
    Offered: Every summer semester (online)

Masters Level

  • EDF 6211 Psychological Foundations of Education (3 credits)
    EDF 6211 is a master’s level course that focuses on the major theories and research in educational psychology. The major goal is for students to learn to apply theories and research in situations with children and adolescents in daily life. The course provides an overview of research in the field of educational psychology, contexts of learning and development, models of learning, and applications to the teaching process. Classroom management techniques and the characteristics of effective classroom instruction are also taught. A student in this class will learn to recognize others’ theoretical perspectives and will better understand why different educators recommend different types of educational programs. The catalog description of the class is: “Selected topics in psychology of human development and learning, related to schools and educational settings.”
    Note: This course is intended primarily for students who are in the College of Education MAT programs or is primarily for those who have not completed an undergraduate course in Educational Psychology.
    Offered: Every semester

  • EDF 6215 Learning Principles Applied to Instruction (4 credits)
    This master’s-level course is taught with a two-fold purpose. The first is to develop in students basic understandings on principles and propositions about human learning emanating from major psychological theories and the empirical research they have engendered. The second is to orient students toward the application of conceptual, theoretical, and empirical insights to the design and delivery of instruction. Special emphasis is placed on cognitive and social-cognitive frameworks. The course deviates from the tradition of defining learning principles narrowly as a ready-to-be-applied set of “scientifically proven” ideas to be offered to students. Rather, learning principles are framed broadly to include theoretically sound and empirically testable insights that might be drawn from in-depth understandings of theory and research. For this reason, the course prepares students for the deliberate, self-regulated process of probing deeply into theory and research findings to derive relevant applications. The course serves as a bridge to further course work on instructional design. The catalog description of the class is: “Learning principles and their application to classroom instruction.”
    Note: This course is intended primarily for students in MA or MEd programs.
    Offered: Every semester

  • EDF 6354 Human Development and Personality Theories (4 credits)
    The catalog description of the class is: “A study of psycho-social and cognitive development throughout a person's life span with an analysis of the major personality theories.”
    Note: This course is only offered to Counselor Education master students.
    Offered: Every spring semester

  • EDF 6217 Behavior Theory and Classroom Learning (4 credits)
    The catalog description of the class is: “Theory and practical applications of behavior modification; introduction to experimental method for behavior modification; operant methods in behavior and development, analysis and field work”. Prerequisite includes EDF 6215 or Consent of Instructor.
    Offered: Every fall and spring semester

  • EDF 6938 Child Development (4 credits)
    The catalog description of the class is: “Exploration and demonstration of knowledge in an area of special interest to the student and/or in an area for which the student needs to demonstrate a higher level of competence. Designed to fit the needs of each student.”
    Note: This course is intended primarily for students in MA or MEd programs.
    Offered: Every spring semester

Doctoral Level

  • EDG 7357 Applications of Developmental Theories (4 credits)
    An introductory course that helps students to understand various theories of development that have implications for curriculum design, student learning, and other educational and mental health practices. This course is offered via distance learning periodically.
    Taught by Dr. DeMarie, Offered: Fall

  • EDF 7138 Adolescent Development (4 credits)
    This course examines adolescent development in the physical, cognitive, social, and motivational domains. Central developmental issues addressed include identity, autonomy, intimacy, sexuality, motivation, and achievement. Social and cultural contexts, developmental theory, methodology, and educational practices and policies are discussed.
    Taught by Dr. Kiefer, Offered: Fall

  • EDF 7145 Cognitive Issues in Instruction (4 credits)
    Selected cognitive models of intelligence, memory, problem solving, thinking, and motivation applied to instructional strategies (PR: Admission to doctoral program and EDF 6215).
    Taught by: Dr. DeMarie, Offered: Spring

  • EDF 7265 The Psychology of Oral and Written Language Development (4 credits)
    This course focuses on theoretical and empirical perspectives of monolingual and bilingual language and literacy development. A foundational understanding of language and literacy allows a student the ability to critically analyze practical implications.
    Taught by Dr. Lopez, Offered: Spring

  • EDF 7359 Resilience in Human Development (4 credits)
    This course explores (1) the concepts of resilience in human development from developmental, cognitive, neuropsychological and social-cultural perspective, (2) the factors underpinning the relations between adverse experiences and positive outcomes, and (3) the intervention and prevention strategies that can be used to facilitate resilience.
    Taught by Dr. Tan, Offered: Fall

  • EDF 7239 Supervised Experiences in College Teaching (1 credit)
    A seminar to increase knowledge and competencies in college instruction. Students must have advanced graduate standing, be currently teaching a college level course, willing to be observed, and able to discuss ongoing classroom practices and problems. Open to all doctoral level Education majors, other doctoral students if space available.
    Offered: Every semester

  • EDG 7931 Professional Seminar (1 credit per semester, minimum of 4 credits required)
    A one credit professional seminar acts as the binding glue that brings all students, regardless of their level in the program, and selected faculty members together each semester. In this course, students learn aspects of how scholars in educational psychology do their work. For example, students will learn to review conference papers, the psychology of selecting journals where manuscripts are sent and of publishing in general, how to review journal articles, how to write a grant, how to write job application letters and how to interview for a job, how to establish a program of research, the politics of departments, what is needed to earn tenure, etc. Students will complete a minimum of one credit of professional seminar their first four semesters in the program. It is open to other students from other doctoral programs as well.
    Offered: Every semester

  • EDG 7910 Research Practicum (1 credit per semester, minimum of 4 credits required)
    A one credit research practicum acts as the glue for the mentorship of each student with a faculty member who is affiliated with Educational Psychology. Students are expected to be engaged in research with a faculty member every semester during the program. Students will complete a minimum of one credit of research practicum their first four semesters in the program.
    Offered: Every semester