University of South Florida

School of Art & Art History

USF College of The Arts

Pamela Merrill Brekka

Instructor II, Art History
Ph.D., University of Florida
Phone: (813) 974-2360
Email: pmerrill@usf.edu
Office: FAH 252

Pamela Merrill Brekka specializes in Northern Renaissance and Baroque art. Her research interests include the history of cartography; infrared reflectography for the examination of underdrawings in paintings; the sixteenth-century Antwerp print market; Reformation era exegesis and the illustrated bible, and the history of Jewish art. Brekka's publications include: “Tabernaculi interiori,” in eds. Michel Weemans, et al., Voir double. Pièges et révélations du visisble (Paris: Hazan, 2016); "The ‘Living’ Tabernacle in the Antwerp Polyglot Bible," in eds. Walter Melion, et al., The Anthropomorphic Lens: Anthropomorphism, Microcosmism and Analogy in Early Modern Thought and Visual Arts (Leiden: Brill, 2014); "The Antwerp Polyglot Bible's 'New World Indian-Jew' Map as a Reflection of Empire," in Imago Mundi: International Journal for the History of Cartography, vol. 63 (June 2011); "Pieter de Hooch," "Nicolaes Maes," "Pieter Brueghel the younger," and "Jan Breughel the elder," in ed. Christopher Baker, Absolutism and the Scientific Revolution 1600-1720 (Westport, 2002), and "An Early Netherlandish Adoration of the Magi," in Record of the Art Museum, Princeton University, vol. 59 (2000). Brekka has presented her research at international conferences, including: the College Art Association Annual Conference (Los Angeles, 2018); the Sixteenth-Century Study Conference (San Francisco 1995), and the Southeastern College Art Conference (New Orleans, 2008) and (forthcoming Chattanooga, 2019). She is the recipient of a Newberry Library Fellowship in the History of Cartography; was awarded a University of London, School of Advanced Study scholarship in the History of Maps and Mapping (London Rare Books School), and is a University Women's Club Scholar (University of Florida). At USF, Brekka teaches the History of Visual Arts (HVA) I + II, and undergraduate surveys and seminars in Renaissance Cartography, Northern Renaissance Art and Dutch Baroque Art. She has taught at The University of Tampa, the University of Florida, and Hillsborough Community College, Ybor.