Undergraduate

Major

Why Choose an Anthropology Major?

Anthropology is the study of people, of what makes us human. Anthropology is unique, even among the social sciences: It explores what it means to be human in all its dimensions. When we study anthropology, we learn how we fit in the global tapestry of cultures, ethnicities, and histories - by learning about others, we come to understand ourselves more fully.

The field of anthropology is made up of four subfields: cultural, linguistic, biological, and archaeology. Cultural anthropology explores how people across the globe live and view the world around them. Anthropologists want to listen to all voices and viewpoints to better understand the differences and similarities within and between groups. Linguistic anthropologists study the ways in which people communicate. This includes looking at how languages work, how they have changed over time, and how different languages relate to one another. Linguistic anthropologists also look at the various ways humans use language in our lives to create society and culture. Biological anthropologists focus on a wide variety of topics related to the human body. They are interested in genetics, human skeletal remains, diet, health, evolution, and much more. Biological anthropologists study humans, living and dead, as well as other primates and human ancestors. Archaeologists study human culture by analyzing people of the past, usually focusing on the objects they made. Through careful digging, past cultures can be revealed and a clearer understanding of how people lived, differences and similarities between groups, and the way past people affected the world around them can be gained.

The USF Anthropology B.A. offers a taste of all the major subfields, while stressing the applied importance of anthropology and its relevance to real world, current problems. Applied anthropology uses the theories, methods, and findings of anthropological research and combines it with other anthropological skills, such as communication, cultural awareness, and critical thinking, to solve problems and build bridges between various groups of people. Applied anthropologists work in a wide variety of fields, including health and medicine, human rights, education, business, cultural resource management, museums, natural and cultural disasters, and international relations. The department at USF often offers opportunities for hands-on fieldwork, and our Honors Program provides an individualized research opportunity for high-achieving students.

Where will my degree take me?

A B.A. in anthropology can be the gateway to a range of opportunities and careers. Many of our graduates go on to medical school, law school, or other professional programs, or stay within anthropology to study for a Masters or Doctoral degree. And the demand for trained anthropologists is strong and growing. Anthropologists with higher degrees find fulfilling careers in national and international development, heritage and museum fields, health care, education, marketing, human rights advocacy, and NGO and relief agencies. And did you know that many corporations love anthropologists

But the B.A. is also an excellent entry-level qualification for many careers. In an increasingly globalized and multi-cultural world, anthropology graduates offer skills in communication, cultural awareness, critical thinking, and research methods. Whatever your job title, you can bring anthropological insights into any field

A choice of two useful Minors

Anthropology also offers two Minors - one that touches on all aspects of the discipline, and one in Biomedical Anthropology, which is a perfect companion to degrees in Pre-Med, Public Health, or Nursing.

 For information and advice about the Anthropology major or minor(s), contact the Undergraduate Advisor Elicia Dick.

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REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR IN ANTHROPOLOGY (2018-2019 CATALOG YEAR)

The major in Anthropology consists of 19 credit hours of major core courses. Students will normally begin progress toward the major by taking at least one course from the major core, as these often serve as prerequisites for the electives. Students are urged to consult with the anthropology advisor to create the most beneficial set of courses. In order to graduate, students must maintain an average best attempt 2.5 GPA in all courses counted toward the major.

MAJOR CORE COURSES - 19 HOURS

MAJOR ELECTIVE COURSES - 18 HOURS

Students are required to complete a minimum of 18 hours of 4000-level elective coursework, including at least one course from each subfield. A minimum of three (3) of these 18 credits must be selected from a list of designated Methods courses. Methods courses may also be counted toward the subdivision requirement. For a full list of elective courses, please click here

An example of a four-year curriculum plan for Anthropology Majors can be found here