Academic Program

Electives

Students select three available courses (9 credits) such as the following typically offered to complete the M.A. or M.S. degree.

Electives

ANG 5937 - Global Tourism (3)
ANG 5937 - Globalization and Technology (3)
ANG 6436 - Issues in Heritage Tourism (3)
ANG 6469 - Anthropology of Food (3)
ARC 5931 - Special Topics in Architecture: Landscape & Ecology as Urbanism (3)
ARC 5931 - Sustainable Neighborhood Development (3)
CGN 6933 - Green Engineering for Sustainability (3)
CGN 6933 - Green Infrastructure for Sustainable Communities (3)
CGN 6933 - Sustainable Transportation (3)
CWR 6305 - Urban Hydrology (3)
ECH 5785 - Sustaining the Earth: An Engineering Approach (3)
EEL 6935 - Sustainable Energy (3)
EIN 6935 - Lean Six Sigma (3)
ENT 6016 - New Venture Formation (3)
ENT 6415 - Venture Capital and Private Equity in Entrepreneurship (3)
ENT 6606 - Product Development (3)
ENT 6930 - Global Entrepreneurship (3)
ENT 6947 - Advanced Topics in Entrepreneurship (3)
ENV 4417 - Water Quality and Treatment (3)
ENV 6667 - Environmental Biotechnology (3)
EVR 6216 - Advances in Water Quality Policy and Management (3)
EVR 6320 - Environmental Management (3)
EVR 6937 - Seminar in Environmental Policy: Environmental Policy and the Built Environment (3)
EVR 6937 - Seminar in Environmental Policy: Planning, Policy and Politics (3)
EVR 6937 - Seminar in Environmental Policy: Sustainability and Development (3)
GEB 6457 - Ethics, Law and Sustainable Business Practices (3)
GEB 6930 - Environmental Law and Issues (3)
GMS 6095 - Principles of Intellectual Property (3)
IDS 6938 - Environmental Law and Sustainable Business Practices (3)
IDS 6938 - Sustainability Design Laboratory (3)
MAN 6930 - Global Entrepreneurship (3)
MAR 6936 - Sustainable Marketing (3)
PAD 5035 - Intro to Applied GIS (3)
PAD 6335 - Urban Growth Management (3)
PAD 6336 - Community Development Programs and Strategies (3)
PHC 6934 - Public Health Topics in Global Sustainability (3)
URP 6930 - Disaster Resilient Community (3)
URP 6930 - Environmental Planning Issues in Coastal Communities (3)
URP 6930 - Environmental Policy & the Built Environment (3)
URP 6930 - Food Systems Planning (3)

Course Descriptions

ANG 5937 -  Global Tourism (3)
Global tourism is perhaps the largest scale movement of goods, services, and people that humanity has ever seen. Consequently, it has been (and continues to be) a significant catalyst for economic development and sociopolitical change throughout the world. According to the United Nations, international tourist arrivals in 2013 totaled nearly one billion! While tourism increasingly accounts for ever greater segments of national economies, the consequences of this growth for cultural exchanges are diverse and uncertain. The proliferation of tourists also challenges classic theoretical descriptions of just what an economy is. What are the commodities being consumed? What is the division of labor between producers and consumers in creating the value of tourist exchanges? How do culture, power, and history shape these interactions? What are the prospects for sustainable tourism? How is cultural heritage being shaped by tourists and stakeholders around the world? In this course, we will exam these critical questions through a systems approach, emphasizing tourism's interconnectedness with social, political, economic, and natural environments.

ANG 5937 -  Globalization and Technology (3)
Cultural anthropology, founded on the desire to understand humans' interactions and differences, has long confronted the socio-cultural encounters that have resulted from European exploration, travel, tourism, and the expansion of capitalism. But in our contemporary world, new technologies increasingly combine new generations of people into complex relations that span the globe. The results include new types and experiences of cross-cultural relationships as people are drawn together into global networks. The first part of the course is largely historical, focusing on print media, mass production, photography, and music. The course then turns to an investigation of the recent effects of digital media and information and communication technologies (ICTs) on socio-cultural connectivity. The course will ask questions such as: How has access to digital technologies such as cell phones and email shaped new understanding of socio-cultural differences? How have ideologies of neoliberalism, globalization, and democracy shape lived reality today? How has increased dependence on digital technologies reconfigured power relations, providing new opportunities for some, but deepening inequality for others? This course combines in-class discussions with readings, media presentations (including documentaries and music and film clips), weekly response papers, and a final research project. Final projects will require students to research a social networking site or online community. The focus of projects will be to identify, observe, and then discuss inequalities based on gender, race, class, or nationality, as well as the production of or resistance to new forms of exotification and social connectivity being produced through new media and digital technology.

ANG 6436 -  Issues in Heritage Tourism (3)
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the theoretical and practical issues in heritage
tourism and the business of heritage resource management from an anthropological perspective.

ANG 6469 -  Anthropology of Food (3)
Please contact Sue Rhinehart for more information. You can reach her at:
Phone: 813.974.2726
Email: srhineha@usf.edu

ARC 5931 -  Special Topics in Architecture: Landscape & Ecology as Urbanism (3)
This course will examine landscape and ecology as urbanism as a critical design practice and theory that has
emerged within the past decade, which engages urbanism and the natural and ecological worlds in a
symbiotic and interdependent relationship. This model of applying science and ecological thinking to the
design of the built urban environment is of particular importance with respect to contemporary challenges
facing the urban designer, including issues of sustainability and remediation of the urban environment.

ARC 5931 -  Sustainable Neighborhood Development (3)
Urban designers, architects, landscape architects, planners, real estate developers, environmental
engineers, public officials and community advocates are all involved the integrated decision-making
processes often referred to as urban and community design, or more specifically that of city building.
Increasingly they are being asked to create healthy, sustainable, adaptive and resilient urban
neighborhoods. This course will focus on understanding and evaluating sustainable neighborhood
development strategies by utilizing multiple concepts, practices and approaches. In doing so, the course
will apply a number of criteria used at the national level to establish benchmarks and rating metrics for
sustainable neighborhood design and development (including LEED for Neighborhood
Development). Students will assess and critique neighborhood development projects and design
proposals that reflect a number of qualities related to sustainable urbanism in general or seek to
promote specific aspects of sustainable and resilient communities. The scope of this course will include a
survey of sustainable conditions related to the built urban landscape, within the broader context of the
city as an integrated dynamic urban social-ecological system.

CGN 6933 -  Green Engineering for Sustainability (3)
This course will provide a foundation for green engineering design. Concerns regarding population
growth, global warming, resource scarcity, globalization and environmental degradation have led to an
increasing awareness that current engineering design and policy strategies can be engaged more
effectively to advance the goal of sustainability. Approaching sustainability from a design perspective
requires the need for a fundamental conceptual shift from the current paradigms of product toward a
more sustainable system based on efficient and effective use of benign materials and energy.

CGN 6933 -  Green Infrastructure for Sustainable Communities (3)
The focus of the course will be on green infrastructure for urban settings, i.e., water, wastewater, transportation, roads, bridges, buildings, energy, wastes, housing, etc. Of particular emphasis will be the complex interdependencies of infrastructures in an urban/regional setting. Green building and green construction will be a part of the class. We will address the various USGBC LEED programs, from buildings to communities. The course aims to bring together engineers, architects, planners, business managers, natural and social scientists, health professionals, etc in the same class and form multidisciplinary project teams to plan a green building.

CGN 6933 -  Sustainable Transportation (3)
Please contact Sarina Ergas for more information. You can reach her at:
Phone: 813-974-1119
Email: sergas@usf.edu

CWR 6305 -  Urban Hydrology (3)
This course focuses on the study of the quantity and quality problems, and solution techniques
associated with urban runoff.

ECH 5785 -  Sustaining the Earth: An Engineering Approach (3)
This course will introduce an approach of global perspective on ecological principles, revealing how all
the world's life is connected and sustained within the biosphere, and how engineering provides the tools
to design solutions, engaging materials science and environmental ethics.

EEL 6935 -  Sustainable Energy (3)
This course aims to introduce students to concepts of sustainable energy production. Solar, wind,
hydroelectricity, hydrogen, biomass and geothermal energy production methods as well as main storage
technologies will be discussed. These major production methods will be quantitatively compared
throughout the course with the main energy consumption pathways of human societies in different
parts of the globe. Energy consumption of transportation, heating/cooling, food production and
manufacturing of goods will be discussed. Energy savings potentials of the various consumption
pathways will also be examined. After successful participation in this course students will be able to
assess technological aspects of public energy policy, as well as have the foundation for advanced study
of sustainable energy topics.

EIN 6935 -  Lean Six Sigma (3)
Lean topics address concepts of elimination of waste and reduction of cycle time in organizational
processes. Six Sigma principles consist of problem-solving techniques, data collection and statistical
analysis, reduction of process variation, process capability and cost analysis.

ENT 6016 (3) New Venture Formation (3)
An overview of the new venture creation process, this course is intended to provide new students with a
basic understanding of the entrepreneurial process of venture creation and innovation. Lectures and
selected case studies are combined with experienced guest speakers to give students a rich
understanding of the challenges facing entrepreneurs.

ENT 6415 -  Venture Capital and Private Equity in Entrepreneurship (3)
The course focuses on critical skills necessary to develop appropriate financing strategies for new
venture creation and growth. Students will use case studies and team projects in the course of study.
Three primary topics are covered: 1) an overview of the entrepreneurial finance process and involved
players; 2) performing business valuations; and 3) securities law with emphasis on developing term
sheets and private placement memorandums. Student teams will complete a valuation and mock
securities offering for an existing small to mid-size business. Financial valuations and terms sheets
developed by student teams will be presented to a panel of venture capital professionals for evaluation
and critique.

ENT 6606 -  Product Development (3)
This course focuses on new product development process from invention to commercialization of
technology products. Topics include intellectual property, product design, manufacturing process,
patent process, licensing, market assessment and commercialization. Students will use case studies and
team projects in the course of study.

ENT 6930 -  Global Entrepreneurship (3)
Entrepreneurship is constantly changing on a global scale with entrepreneurship experiencing radical changes in technology, communications, capital markets and geopolitical frameworks. Today's globally-focused startups are building successful ventures to compete around the globe. In this class students will gain an understating and appreciation for the challenges of conducting business outside the United States gaining knowledge in investor strategies, global supply chains, addressing international customers, and managing employees located around the globe. The challenges these entrepreneurs face, particularly in emerging markets, are some of the most complex and sophisticated for their businesses and the governments under which they operate.

ENT 6947 -  Advanced Topics in Entrepreneurship (3)
The Advanced Topics course is intended to provide students the opportunity to apply acquired
knowledge into practice. This is achieved either through an individual, faculty directed project or
through a field study/internship. Students elect either option depending on their individual needs and
goals. Individual projects typically involve developing a business plan for a business the student intends
to launch. Internships involve working directly with senior business leaders in an entrepreneurial
environment. Students will be expected to participate in open classroom discussion of their ongoing
experiences during their projects/internships, with a presentation of their project before peers and
faculty. (A limited number of fellowships may also be applied.)

ENV 4417 -  Water Quality and Treatment (3)                                                                                                                                     ENV4417 provides students with experience in conducting engineering calculations to evaluate water quality and to design water and wastewater treatment facilities. Topics include water quality, principles of physical, chemical, and biological treatment systems, design calculations, and interpretation of regulatory constraints. Students learn to evaluate performance and reliability of treatment units used in the production of drinking water and treatment of wastewater. Constraints associated with municipal,private and point-of-use treatment systems are evaluated.

ENV 6667 -  Environmental Biotechnology (3)
Environmental biotechnology is an important tool in providing sustainable water resources and
protecting the health of humans and ecosystems. The focus of the class will be on both principles and
applications of environmental biotechnology pertaining primarily to biological wastewater treatment. It
is anticipated that topics of bioremediation will also be covered to some extent. Under principles, we will
review the basics of microbiology and cover topics such as electron and oxygen equivalents,
stoichiometry, energetics and kinetics of microbial growth, substrate degradation kinetics, suspendedand
attached-growth systems, bioreactor concepts for completely-mixed and plug flow systems. Under
applications, we will cover treatment processes relevant to environmental engineering, such as lagoons
and ponds, activated sludge, biological nutrient removal, membrane bioreactors, trickling filters and
rotating biological contactors, fluidized bed reactors and anaerobic digestion. This class will be most
useful to engineers and scientists interested and responsible for municipal and industrial wastewater
treatment, as well as the biological treatment of industrial and hazardous wastes.

EVR 6216 -  Advances in Water Quality Policy and Management (3)
This course focuses on the conceptual structure and practical implementation of U.S. watershed-based
water quality regulations and policies. Practical application of scientific information and quantitative
methods in management/policy decisions for water quality protection is a necessary component of
coursework.

EVR 6320 -  Environmental Management (3)
This course introduces the students to environmental management from technical and non-technical
perspectives. The major topics covered will be water and air quality, environmental sustainability,
collaboration and building consensus.

EVR 6937 -  Seminar in Environmental Policy: Environmental Policy and the Built Environment (3)
Critical assessment of environmental policy and regulatory formulation, implementation, evaluation,
and revision in the context of scientific, technological, institutional, political, social and economic
factors; case studies of major U.S. policies.

EVR 6937 -  Seminar in Environmental Policy: Planning, Policy and Politics (3)
Critical assessment of environmental policy and regulatory formulation, implementation, evaluation,
and revision in the context of scientific, technological, institutional, political, social and economic
factors; case studies of major U.S. policies.

EVR 6937 -  Seminar in Environmental Policy: Sustainability and Development (3)
The course will take a holistic approach to exploring the concepts of sustainability and development. We
will critically evaluate sustainability initiatives and challenges, the role of economic, political and cultural
systems in development, environmental and social change, and the notion of development as progress.
The seminar will largely be an article-based course where each student will have the opportunity to
focus on an issue or topic related to research interests in the context of sustainability and development.
Students may explore criteria associated with AGENDA 21 including, but not limited to: strategies for
sustainable development; cooperation and alliances for a sustainable future; education, culture and
sustainable development; business, corporate social responsibility and green technology; environmental
management and sustainability; global, national and local governance and institutions for sustainability.

GEB 6457 -  Ethics, Law and Sustainable Business Practices (3)
This course examines major and emerging issues pertaining to business sustainability. Sustainability for
business requires a strategic focus on the triple bottom line via an assessment of environmental, social,
and economic factors. The course surveys key regulations and trends and reviews models for creating
socially and environmentally responsible organizations. The study of sustainability is a study of society's
mechanisms for long-term planning particularly regarding the use and protection of scarce resources.
The goal is to develop an appreciation for the fundamental role environmental considerations must play
in decision-making processes.

GEB 6930 -  Environmental Law and Issues (3)
Please contact Karen Carlin for more information. You can reach her at:
Phone: (813) 974-3335
Email: karencarlin@usf.edu

GMS 6095 -  Principles of Intellectual Property (3)
This course focuses on the various approaches to protection of intellectual property rights including
domestic and international patent filings, copyrights, trademarks and trade secrets. The course
examines the relevance of intellectual property protection to the development of a global strategy for
business growth.

IDS 6938 - Sustainability Design Laboratory (3)

The "PCGS Sustainability Design Laboratory" is a collaborative all-hands-on-deck and definitively hands-on workshop course in "Geospatial Imagineering" that trains students to cooperatively "Envision Sustainability" and communicate their best-practice scientific and policy possibilities and solutions through Geodesy/GIS based and gamified iterative design and digital engineering.  It is the technology-oriented companion course to the more philosophical and academic Envisioning Sustainability course.

The course takes place at the USF 3D Access Lab where students have access to state-of-the-art gaming computers and extensible reality (XR/VR/AR) headsets and powerful hardware and software for the creative visualization of sustainability. 

 It is a sustainability oriented media production course "of the students and faculty, by the students and faculty, FOR the students and faculty" that stays current because, like the "Experimental Prototype Community of Tomorrow"  built by the Disney Imagineering community, this adaptive  course  will always be  in a constant state of becoming, attentive to the needs of each incoming class, adapting to the rapid pace of technological change in the context of accelerated climate and habitat change. The curriculum is designed to co-evolve with input from you,  its stakeholders,  so that you can show the world what sustainability means and looks like and feels like to YOU.

MAN 6930 -  Global Entrepreneurship (3)
Entrepreneurship is constantly changing on a global scale with entrepreneurship experiencing radical
changes in technology, communications, capital markets and geopolitical frameworks. Today's globallyfocused
startups are building successful ventures to compete around the globe. In this class, students
will gain an understating and appreciation for the challenges of conducting business outside the United
States, gaining knowledge in investor strategies, global supply chains, addressing international
customers and managing employees located around the globe. The challenges these entrepreneurs face,
particularly in emerging markets, are some of the most complex and sophisticated for their businesses'
and the governments under which they operate.

MAR 6936 -  Sustainable Marketing (3)
A course designed to help students understand the challenges and opportunities with respect to
marketing an organization that strives to be sustainable.

PAD 5035 -  Intro to Applied GIS (3)
Please contact the School of Public Affairs for more information. You can reach them at:
Phone: 813-974-7861

PAD 6335 -  Urban Growth Management (3)
Examines the political economy of controlling the growth and development of human settlements, regulatory and non-regulatory techniques of growth management, and the evolution of growth management practices in the U.S.

PAD 6336 -  Community Development Programs and Strategies (3)
Discusses community development principles and practices in historical and contemporary perspectives, federal, state and local initiatives, physical, social, and economic approaches to community development.

PHC 6934 -  Public Health Topics in Global Sustainability (3)
Please contact the College of Public Health for more information. You can reach them at:
Phone: (813) 974-3623

URP 6930 -  Disaster Resilient Community (3)
Study of the factors that promote effective disaster preparedness and mitigation, with a focus on involvement of community stakeholders. Students will participate in a "service learning" project with the Hillsborough County Hazards Mitigation office.

URP 6930 -  Environmental Planning Issues in Coastal Communities (3)
Consideration of the planning and environmental policy concerns that affect the resiliency of coastal communities. Explores the roles of both urban and environmental planners in shaping policies and management decisions for cities located in the unique coastal zone environment, within Federal, state, and local regulatory contexts. Topics include urban planning within the framework of climate change impacts, especially sea level rise; the evaluation of natural and man-made infrastructure solutions; and cutting edge planning tools for protecting and developing coastal communities, such as ecosystem based management, integrated coastal management, and strategic environmental assessment.

URP 6930 -  Environmental Policy & the Built Environment (3)
Please contact the School of Public Affairs for more information. You can reach them at:
Phone: 813-974-7861

URP 6930 -  Food Systems Planning (3)
Topics Include Food Systems in a Globalizing World, Global Food Security and Supply, Food and Sustainability, Local Food, Slow Food, Production Issues: Rural and Urban, Social Issues: Immigrants, Jobs, Neighborhoods, Food System Workers, and Access and Consumption