Endowed Lecture

Schneller Chemistry Legacy Lecture Series

Overview

In May, 2014, Stew and Aina Schneller established the Schneller Chemistry Legacy Lectureship endowment in the College of Arts and Sciences on the Tampa campus of the University.
The Schneller Chemistry Legacy Lectureship will host one lecture per year within the Chemistry Department. The Schneller Legacy Lecturer is to be chosen by the chemistry department chair in consultation with appropriate faculty members forming a committee. Each Schneller Chemistry Legacy Lecturer will receive a plaque recognizing his/her lecture. 

Stew Schneller served as a member of the USF chemistry faculty from 1971-1994 that included being chair of the department from 1986-1994.
This Schneller Chemistry Legacy Lectureship honors the chemistry faculty who, from 1960 to 1968, traveled from sand spurs and gravel roads to arrive at a Ph.D. granting department with an undergraduate degree program consistently recognized by the American Chemical Society.

If I have seen further than others, it is by standing upon the shoulders of giants.
~Isaac Newton

schneller

                                      The Schnellers: Aina and Dr. Stewart Schneller

2015
Name Position Lecture Title
Eric N. Jacobsen, Ph.D. Sheldon Emory Professor and Chair Department of Chemistry & Chemical Biology, Harvard University "Anion-Binding Catalysis"
2016
Name Position Lecture Title
Andrew Hamilton, Ph.D. Professor of Chemistry and 16th President New York University "Synthetic Mimics of Protein Structure and Function"
2017
Name Position Lecture Title
Jeffrey Johnston, Ph.D.   New Catalysts, Methods, and Strategies for Therapeutic Development and On-Demand Natural Product Total Synthesis
Table Caption
Name Position Lecture Title
Sarah Reisman, Ph.D.   Necessity is the Mother of Invention: Natural Products and the Chemistry They Inspire
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Name Position Lecture Title
Wendy Young, Ph.D. Senior Vice President of Small Molecule Drug Discovery Genentech, Inc. Delivering Innovative Medicines: Small Changes Can Have a Large Effect