Equal Opportunity

Protected Categories

Age

Age discrimination

Age discrimination involves treating an applicant or employee less favorably because of his or her age.

The Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) forbids age discrimination against people who are age 40 or older. It does not protect workers under the age of 40. Discrimination can occur when the victim and the person who inflicted the discrimination are both over 40. The State of Florida does not have a minimum age requirement before receiving protection against age discrimination. Florida extends age discrimination protection to an individual at any age.

Age Discrimination & Work Situations

The law prohibits discrimination in any aspect of employment, including hiring, firing, pay, job assignments, promotions, layoff, training, benefits, and any other term or condition of employment.

Age Discrimination & Harassment

It is unlawful to harass a person because of his or her age.

Harassment can include, for example, offensive or derogatory remarks about a person's age. Although the law does not prohibit simple teasing, offhand comments, or isolated incidents that are not very serious, harassment is illegal when it is so frequent or severe that it creates a hostile or offensive work environment or when it results in an adverse employment decision (such as the target of the harassment being fired or demoted).

The harasser can be the target’s supervisor, a supervisor in another area, a co-worker, or someone who is not an employee of the employer, such as a client or customer.

Disability

Disability forms and links:

Request for Public Accommodation Form
Disability and Accommodations (Public/Employees/Students)
Johnson Scholarship Application Form

USF Minimum Electronic and Web Accessibility Standards (MEWAS)

The University of South Florida is committed to creating websites, electronic course content, and on-line learning environments that are inclusive and accessible to all users. This explicitly includes users with disabilities who employ assistive technologies or other alternative means to access our electronic or web information.

USF has assured compliance with both Section 504 and Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 which requires that all public institutions be accessible to persons with disabilities. Section 508 requires that the University make its websites accessible to users with visual, hearing, mobility and cognitive disabilities.

Developers throughout the USF System should take some time to review the documentation which outlines the standards and best practices for their implementations.

See full materials here

If you have comments, concerns, or complaints about your experience with any of the university's employees, services, programs, or facilities, please inform our ADA Coordinator, Shari Wilson, by sending an email to sdwilson@usf.edu.

Overview of the Americans with Disabilities Act at USF

It is the policy and practice of the University of South Florida to comply fully with the requirements of the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) and all other federal and State laws and regulations prohibiting discrimination on the basis of disability. The ADA was designed to extend civil rights protection to people with disabilities. Title II of the ADA mandates that government agencies make their programs and services accessible to and usable by, persons with disabilities. Even before the passage of the ADA, USF was covered by the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, sections 503 and 504, which mandated that programs and services be accessible to people with disabilities.

The interactive reasonable accommodation process includes the involvement of several resource offices for people with disabilities; Student Disability Services, the Employee Relations section of Human Resources, and Diversity, Inclusion and Equal Opportunity Office. The University requires five (5) working days to provide disability accommodations at public events.

The University of South Florida has several offices that assist with Americans with Disabilities Act Compliance and Reasonable Accommodations.

The discrimination complaint investigation process lists steps to follow for a formal allegation of discrimination by disability status.

Programs and Services for Students With Disabilities

Contacts on All Campuses

 

Nationality

National Origin

National origin discrimination involves treating people (applicants or employees) unfavorably because they are from a particular country or part of the world, because of ethnicity or accent, or because they appear to be of a certain ethnic background (even if they are not).

National origin discrimination also can involve treating people unfavorably because they are married to (or associated with) a person of a certain national origin or because of their connection with an ethnic organization or group.

Discrimination can occur when the victim and the person who inflicted the discrimination are the same national origin.

National Origin Discrimination & Work Situations
The law forbids discrimination when it comes to any aspect of employment, including hiring, firing, pay, job assignments, promotions, layoff, training, fringe benefits, and any other term or condition of employment.

National Origin & Harassment
It is unlawful to harass a person because of his or her national origin. Harassment can include, for example, offensive or derogatory remarks about a person's national origin, accent or ethnicity. Although the law doesn't prohibit simple teasing, offhand comments, or isolated incidents that are not very serious, harassment is illegal when it is so frequent or severe that it creates a hostile or offensive work environment. 

Other useful link:

TITLE VII OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964

Race/Ethnicity/Color Discrimination

Race/Ethnicity/Color Discrimination 

Race discrimination involves treating someone (an applicant or employee) unfavorably because he/she is of a certain race or because of personal characteristics associated with race (such as hair texture, skin color, or certain facial features). Color discrimination involves treating someone unfavorably because of skin color complexion.

Race/color discrimination also can involve treating someone unfavorably because the person is married to (or associated with) a person of a certain race or color.

Discrimination can occur when the victim and the person who inflicted the discrimination are the same race or color.

Race/Color Discrimination & Work Situations
The law forbids discrimination when it comes to any aspect of employment, including hiring, firing, pay, job assignments, promotions, layoff, training, fringe benefits, and any other term or condition of employment.

Race/Color Discrimination & Harassment
It is unlawful to harass a person because of that person's race or color.

Harassment can include, for example, racial slurs, offensive or derogatory remarks about a person's race or color, or the display of racially-offensive symbols. Although the law doesn't prohibit simple teasing, offhand comments, or isolated incidents that are not very serious, harassment is illegal when it is so frequent or severe that it creates a hostile or offensive work environment.  

Religious

Religious Discrimination

Religious discrimination involves treating a person (an applicant or employee) unfavorably because of his or her religious beliefs. The law protects not only people who belong to traditional, organized religions, such as Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, and Judaism, but also others who have sincerely held religious, ethical or moral beliefs.

Religious discrimination can also involve treating someone differently because that person is married to (or associated with) an individual of a particular religion.
 
Religious Discrimination & Work Situations

The law forbids discrimination when it comes to any aspect of employment, including hiring, firing, pay, job assignments, promotions, layoff, training, fringe benefits, and any other term or condition of employment.

Religious Discrimination & Harassment

It is illegal to harass a person because of his or her religion.

Harassment can include, for example, offensive remarks about a person's religious beliefs or practices. Although the law doesn't prohibit simple teasing, offhand comments, or isolated incidents that aren't very serious, harassment is illegal when it is so frequent or severe that it creates a hostile or offensive work environment.

Religious Discrimination & Reasonable Accommodation

The law requires an employer or other covered entity to reasonably accommodate an employee's religious beliefs or practices, unless doing so would cause more than a minimal burden on the operations of the employer's business. This means an employer may be required to make reasonable adjustments to the work environment that will allow an employee to practice his or her religion.

  • For Religious Holidays: Observance by University Employees Policy click here.
  • For Religious Holidays: Observance by University Students Policy click here.

Sex

Sex Discrimination

Sex discrimination involves treating someone (an applicant or employee) unfavorably because of that person's sex.

Discrimination against an individual because of gender identity, including transgender status, or because of sexual orientation is discrimination because of sex in violation of Title VII. For more information about LGBT-related sex discrimination claims, please click here

Pregnancy Discrimination

Pregnancy discrimination involves treating a woman (an applicant or employee) unfavorably because of pregnancy, childbirth, or a medical condition related to pregnancy or childbirth.

Discrimination based on pregnancy is protected by Title IX for student's. 

Equal Compensation

The Equal Pay Act requires that men and women in the same workplace be given equal pay for equal work. The jobs need not be identical, but they must be substantially equal. Job content (not job titles) determines whether jobs are substantially equal. All forms of pay are covered by this law, including salary, overtime pay, bonuses, stock options, profit sharing and bonus plans, life insurance, vacation and holiday pay, cleaning or gasoline allowances, hotel accommodations, reimbursement for travel expenses, and benefits. 

 

Sexual orientation

Sexual orientation is an enduring pattern of romantic or sexual attraction (or a combination of these) to persons of the opposite sex or gender, the same sex or gender, or to both sexes, or more than one gender. Sexual orientation is about who you’re attracted to and who you feel drawn to romantically, emotionally, and sexually.

Sexual Orientation discrimination involves treating an applicant or employee less favorably or harassing an applicant or employee because of his or her sexual orientation. The law prohibits sex discrimination based on sexual orientation. USF’s equal opportunity policies explicitly prohibit discrimination based on a person’s sexual orientation.

While Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 does not explicitly include sexual orientation in its list of protected bases, Supreme Court case law holding that employment actions motivated by gender stereotyping are unlawful sex discrimination. Also, other court decisions interpret the statute's sex discrimination provision as prohibiting discrimination against employees on the basis of sexual orientation.

SEXUAL ORIENTATION & WORK SITUATIONS

The law forbids discrimination in any aspect of employment, including hiring, firing, pay, job assignments, promotions, layoff, training, benefits, and any other term or condition of employment.

Discrimination can include but is not limited to failing to hire an applicant, firing an employee, denying an employee a promotion or providing a lower salary to an employee because of his or her sexual orientation.

SEXUAL ORIENTATION & HARASSMENT

It is unlawful to harass a person because of that person’s sexual orientation. Harassment can include using, for example, derogatory terms, sexually oriented comments, or disparaging remarks for associating with a person of the same or opposite sex.

CAMPUS RESOURCES

HOTLINES

  • USF Advocacy Program 24 hrs. - Crisis line (813) 974-5757
  • Gay and Lesbian National Hotline - 4 pm to midnight 1 (888) 843-4564
  • Gay and Lesbian Youth, under 23 yrs. - 24/7, 1 (800) 850-8078

Veterans

The University of South Florida System (USF System) is a diverse community that values and expects respect and fair treatment of all people. The USF System strives to provide a work and study environment for faculty, staff and students that is free from discrimination and harassment.

The USF System is also committed to the employment and advancement of qualified veterans with disabilities and veterans protected under the Vietnam Era Veterans’ Readjustment Assistance Act, as amended (VEVRAA).

VEVRAA protects the employment rights of several categories of veterans. Called “protected veterans,” these are veterans who are:

Disabled veterans: Those who are “entitled to compensation…under laws administered by the Secretary of Veterans Affairs” or “those who were released from active duty because of a service-connected disability.”
Recently separated veterans; Active duty wartime or campaign veterans; Campaign badge veterans; or Armed Forces service medal veterans.

VETERANS STATUS DISCRIMINATION & WORK SITUATIONS

The law forbids discrimination when it comes to any aspect of employment, including hiring, firing, pay, job assignments, promotions, layoff, training, fringe benefits, and any other term or condition of employment.

VETERANS STATUS & HARASSMENT

It is unlawful to harass a person because of his or her veterans status. Harassment can include, for example, offensive or derogatory remarks about a person being a veteran and/or their veteran’s status. Although the law does not prohibit simple teasing, offhand comments, or isolated incidents that are not very serious, harassment is illegal when it is so frequent or severe that it creates a hostile or offensive work environment. 

USF OFFICE OF VETERANS SERVICES

The Office of Veteran Success provides specialized programs and services to over 2,000 veterans, eligible dependents, active duty service members, and members of the Selected Reserve here on the USF campus. We are a one-stop shop for anything that you, a student veteran, may need.

Although we also assist dependents, our main goal is to help veterans in whatever capacity necessary so that you can succeed with your educational and career goals.