Resources

Accessibull Training Opportunities

Representations of Disability in popular culture

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2021 | 7:00 PM (Eastern) | ONLINE (Microsoft Teams) Event Link
The University of South Florida Humanities Institute (HI) is delighted to host an online conversation with disabled activist, writer, media maker, and consultant, Alice Wong on October 28. Wong (she/her) is the founder and director of the Disability Visibility Project, an online community dedicated to creating, sharing, and amplifying disability media and culture created in 2014. She has been published in dozens of print and online mediums including the New York Times, Vox, PEN America, Uncanny Magazine, Teen Vogue, Rooted in Rights, and others.
Her activism and work in the areas of popular culture, media, politics, disability representation, Medicaid policies and programs, storytelling, and social media have made her one of the leading voices in disability studies. From 2013 to 2015 Alice served as a member of the National Council on Disability, an appointment by President Barack Obama. Alice is the recipient of the 2016 AAPD Paul G. Hearne Leadership Award, an award for emerging leaders with disabilities who exemplify leadership, advocacy, and dedication to the broader cross-disability community. In 2020 Alice was named by Time Magazine as one of 16 people fighting for equality in America. In 2021, she was named a changemaker by Marie Claire magazine.

Alice is the editor of Disability Visibility: First-Person Stories from the Twenty-First Century, an anthology of essays by disabled people. She is currently working on her memoir, Year of the Tiger (Vintage Books, 2022). You can find her on Twitter: @SFdirewolf.

Register on Eventbrite to receive email reminders (not required): https://alicewongusf.eventbrite.com
Direct link to the live event on Microsoft Teams: http://ow.ly/3sUh50FUkN4
*If you do not have a Microsoft Teams account, join as a guest via web browser (no account required).

ASL interpreters and captioning will be provided for the live event. For accommodation requests or questions, email Jade V. at jvonwerder@usf.edu or call 813-974-2913.

HI is looking for faculty and students who conduct research in disability studies for brief podcast-style interviews. Tell us about your work, your reaction to Alice Wong’s presentation, or any other topic you’d like to share. Please email Jade V. at jvonwerder@usf.edu.

Funding for this program was provided through a grant from the Florida Humanities with funds from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this program do not necessarily represent those of Florida Humanities or the National Endowment for the Humanities. 


 

Training opportunities

Student Accessibility Services envisions a university culture defined by equitable access to education, intentional inclusion, and the commitment to dismantling ableism. In working towards that end our office educates students, faculty, and staff on matters of accessibility, ableism, and ally development. 

You are invited to attend the following training opportunities. You may also contact Patricia Owen to schedule training for your department or organization at owenp@usf.edu

Student training Fall 2021

1.  Accessibility 101

Diversity enriches our communities and our lives. Building a university culture that understands the differences between visible and invisible disabilities, creating a more inclusive community, common categories of disabilities and common accommodations for USF students with disabilities helps us to exemplify the USF principles of community.

This training offers opportunities to gain understanding about what accessibility means at USF.  ⁠

October 27th, 2-3pm

November 17, 11-12pm

 


2.  Understanding Ableism - open to everyone (USTABL)

Our society is structured to favor those considered able-bodied. Ableism and ‘able privilege’ are the causes of many disparities those with disabilities face. Understanding barriers faced by disabled students offer opportunities to create a more equitable university experience.

This training considers the history of eugenics in the United States and the ongoing impact on attitudes and culture.

September 24, 1-2pm

November 22, 2-3pm

December 15, 1-2pm

 


3.  Becoming an AccessiBULL Ally

Diversity includes disability.

Practicing allyship means “living your life [in a way] that doesn’t reinforce the same oppressive behaviors [and systems] you’re claiming to be against” (Mia McKenzie, “No More Allies,” 9/30/13). Rather than an identity, allyship is a practice that needs ongoing work and focus.

This training is a starting point for understanding how words, actions, support and accountability are the key ingredients in creating a truly diverse community.

September 27, 11-1pm

October 11, 1-3pm


 Faculty/Staff training Fall 2021

 1. Student Accessibility Services: Who we are, what we do (SASWWA)

 Who is SAS and what do we do?

This training offers the opportunity to learn about our vision and mission, to learn about the students with whom we work, to understand the accommodations process and to ask questions about how you may better serve our diverse student body.

 For information about this training for your department contact owenp@usf.edu

September 13, 1-2pm

October 14, 2-3pm


 2. Becoming an AccessiBULL Ally: Faculty/Staff (ABULLA)

Diversity includes disability.

Practicing allyship means “living your life [in a way] that doesn’t reinforce the same oppressive behaviors [and systems] you’re claiming to be against” (Mia McKenzie, “No More Allies,” 9/30/13). Rather than an identity, allyship is a practice that needs ongoing work and focus.

This training is a starting point for understanding how words, actions, support and accountability are the key ingredients in creating a truly diverse community.

October 1, 11-1pm

December 17, 12-2pm