MSW Program

Curriculum Schedule

FULL-TIME
PART-TIME

Tampa Full-time Program (TOTAL HOURS=60)

1st Year Fall Semester
Course Title Credits

SOW 6105

Foundations in Human Behavior

3

SOW 6305

Foundations of Social Work Micro Practice

3

SOW 6348

Diversity and Social Justice

3

SOW 6186

Foundations of Social Work Macro Practice

2

SOW 6235

Foundations of Social Welfare and Policy

3

SOW 6534 

Field Instruction I

1

 

1st Year Spring Semester
*Advanced Standing Students Enter Here

Course Title Credits

SOW 6405

Foundations of Social Work Research & Statistics
(AS do not take)

3*

SOW 6124

Psychopathology

3

SOW 6342

Social Work Practices with Individuals

 3
 SOW 6535

Field Instruction II

 4*
 SOW 6931

Elective (AS & Non-AS**)

 3
 SOW 6931

Elective (AS only)

 3

* AS - Do not take

 

2nd Year Fall Semester
Course Title Credits

SOW 6362

Social Work Practice with Couples and Families

3

SOW 6438
 

Evaluations of Clinical Practice in Diverse Settings

3

SOW 6236
 

Social Welfare Policy Development & Analysis

SOW 6536

 Field Instruction III  4
SOW 6931

Elective (Non-AS only)

 3**

 

2nd Year Spring Semester
Course Title  Credits

SOW 6126

Health, Illness, & Disability

2

SOW 6368

Social Work Practice with Groups

3

SOW 6539

Field Instruction IV

4

SOW 8907

Capstone Project

1

SOW 6931

Elective (Non-AS only)

3**

Advanced Standing students are required to take 2 clinical electives for 6 credits. **Non-Advanced Standing students are required to take 3 clinical electives for 9 credits. All clinical electives must be taken in the School of Social Work except, Students in the Dual MSW/MPH Program can take all electives in the School of Public Health. That includes using core courses as electives. Students may take electives during any semester including summer sessions. However, non-AS students should consider taking electives as recommended in 1st Yr Spring, 1st Yr Summer, and 2nd Yr Spring semesters.

 

Current Approved Electives offered by the School of Social Work

This three hour graduate course will explore the biopsychosocial aspects of traumatic stress. How people respond to traumatic stress is an individual matter based on a number of factors including psychological, emotional, social, cultural, biological, familial, and environmental influences. Attention will be given to how to evaluate, select, and implement appropriate multidimensional assessment, diagnostic, intervention, and practice evaluation tools for working with individuals affected by trauma. In addition to assessment, a main focus of the course will be on empirically-based interventions for individuals and communities affected by trauma. This course will provide the framework for understanding, preventing and treating traumatic stress by drawing upon research and theory. In addition, a trauma-informed care framework that recognizes the strengths and resilience of those affected as well as the self-care needed for those who provide trauma work will be explored.

The course will introduce students to the essential clinical practice skills needed to effectively address the challenges of integrated services, care, and support for persons with health, mental health, and substance use problems. Students will become fluent in the language and culture of health and will develop a working knowledge of a wide variety of chronic health conditions. Students will examine the challenges of multidisciplinary team practice and current best evidence-based practices for effective interventions. Throughout the course, students will critique behavior change theories, practice models, and evidence-based interventions for their utility in an integrated healthcare system. Building on the student’s foundational knowledge of general practice skills (engagement, screening, comprehensive assessment, treatment planning, documentation, and evaluation) this course will emphasize practice skills and implementation approaches designed to enhance effective communication, consumer engagement, motivation, and client empowerment. Through the use of case vignettes, assignments, role plays and small group activities, students will gain experience and skills necessary to be effective in a variety of behavioral health roles (e.g. care manager, behavioral health consultant, health coach, patient advocate, counselor, team leader). Finally, students will increase their knowledge of complementary and alternative therapies and the importance of self-care and disease management.

Social work practice is presented within a pluralistic, eclectic framework as an orderly process of planned change with various client systems and the application of ethical and technical practice principles. Students are encouraged to explore the professional “use of self” through self-awareness as a means to better understand the impact on delivery of client services. The client systems of primary concern in this course are micro-system in nature (individuals, families and small groups) although the macro-systems concept is introduced and identified when applicable. The purpose of this course is to help students to approach the issues impacting children and adolescents and their families from both a strengths-based and systems perspective. Specific emphasis will be given in this course to the understanding of the cultural, economic, and environmental issues which impact family functioning. Particular attention is given to the development of skills related to the assessment of risk and resiliency factors within a family-centered treatment approach through the integration of student knowledge with service learning. The course focuses on understanding and relating to persons of diverse backgrounds including oppressed groups, populations-at-risk, and racial or ethnic minorities. Direct practice experience is designed to allow extrapolation of findings to broader at-risk populations.

This 3-credit graduate course is intended for social work public health, nursing and other students interested in women’s behavioral health issues, including mental health substance abuse and trauma. The course incorporates a detailed examination of the interaction of physical and mental health concerns and how they affect the lives of women across the life span. The curriculum reviews current research on women’s mental health, and criteria for valid and useful evaluation of women’s mental health services. The class will discuss how to evaluate, select, and implement gender and age appropriate Bio-psycho-social-spiritual assessments, evidence-based interventions and trauma informed models of practice for working with women who have a history of interpersonal violence and trauma. Additionally, the course provides for discussion of important service delivery issues including, ethical and cultural issues, experienced in interdisciplinary service settings. A goal of the curriculum is to train students to critique current healthcare practices as they relate to the delivery of women’s mental health services. In addition, the course is designed to help students develop and improve critical thinking as well as oral and written communication skills.

This course is designed for social workers in various fields of clinical practice. It will promote understanding of clinical supervision and its critical role in continuing professional growth. Supervisory theory and practice in clinical settings will be a primary focus. Students will develop knowledge and skills in balancing the complexities of supervisory roles, relationships, and process. Major supervisory functions will be emphasized as important concepts in grappling with today’s practice realities--such as supervisory models, ethical issues in supervision, becoming a multicultural competent supervisor and legal issues in supervision. This course will introduce students to the functions and contextual dimensions of social work supervision. Administrative and clinical perspectives will be examined within the contextual framework of social work supervision as managers and leaders in human service organizations. The class is taught as a seminar, with student responsible for active class participation. Students will learn through a variety of teaching methods, including lectures and discussions, quest experts, class exercises and student presentations, and out-of-class assignments.

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of child and adolescent maltreatment and child welfare services from an historical, political and theoretical perspective. Students taking this course will explore policies, theories, models, causes and consequences for child and adolescent maltreatment. Major areas of thought will be explored from perspectives including systems and ecological models. The course will incorporate clinical experience, case examples, current research, as well as legal and ethical concerns for the practitioner, educator or other related professional.

This three credit graduate course reviews the terminology and concepts of Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment (CBT) within a multi-cultural context. CBT is a combination of two kinds of treatment: Cognitive and Behavioral. Cognitive treatment focuses on thoughts, assumptions, and beliefs. Within cognitive treatment, people learn to recognize and change faulty or maladaptive thinking patterns. In behavioral treatment, simply, people learn how to change behavior. This course exams how the two treatment modalities complement each other and in what contexts it is most/least effective. The course will explore methods of focusing on participants’ problem-solving abilities, building on participants’ strengths, targeting specific thought patterns that impede participants’ from reaching goals, and assessing outcomes in terms of changes in thinking and behavior. Theory is applied to individuals, dyads, families, and groups. The course examines relevant quantitative and qualitative research suggesting both indication and counter-indications of approaches. The course is taught from a systemic and strengths perspective.

 

TAMPA PART-TIME program (TOTAL HOURS=60)

1st Semester - Fall
Course Title Credits

SOW 6105

Foundations in Human Behavior

3

SOW 6305

Foundations of Social Work Micro Practice

3

SOW 6348

 Diversity and Social Justice  3
2nd Semester - Spring
Course Title Credits

SOW 6186
 

Foundations of Social Work Macro Practice

2

SOW 6235
 

Foundations of Social Welfare and Policy

3

SOW 6534

 Field Instruction I  1
3rd Semester - Summer
Course Title Credits

SOW 6405

Foundations of Social Work Research & Statistics

3

SOW 6553

Field Instruction

2

SOW 6931

Elective 

 3
4th Semester - Fall
*Advanced Standing Students Enter Here
Course Title Credits

SOW 6124

Psychopathology

3

SOW 6342

Social Work Practices with Individuals

3

SOW 6554

Field Instruction (AS-Do not take)

2*

SOW 6931

Elective (AS only)

3**

* AS - Do not take
** - AS only

5th Semester - Spring
Course Title Credits

SOW 6362
 

Social Work Practice with Couples and Families

3

SOW 6438
 

Evaluations of Clinical Practice in Diverse Settings

3

SOW 6555

Field Instruction  2
6th Semester - Summer
Course Title Credits

SOW 6126

Health, Illness, & Disability

2

SOW 6368

Social Work Practice with Groups

3

SOW 6556

Field Instruction

2
7th Semester - Fall
Course Title Credits

SOW 6236
 

Social Welfare Policy Development & Analysis

3

SOW 6557

Field Instruction

2

SOW 6931

Elective  3
8th Semester - Spring
Course Title Credits

SOW 8907

Capstone Project

1

SOW 6558

Field Instruction

2

SOW 6931 

 Elective  3

*Advanced Standing students are required to take 2 clinical electives for 6 credits.

Non-Advanced Standing students are required to take 3 clinical electives for 9 credits.All clinical electives must be taken in the School of Social Work. Students may take electives during any semester including summer sessions.  However, students should consider the program course schedule for the recommended semesters for electives.

*AS-Advanced Standing