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Eight USF faculty members named new AAAS Fellows

Eight USF faculty members who have led their disciplines in research, innovation and scholarship have been named new Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), one of higher education’s highest honors bestowed by peers.

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University News

USF forensic anthropologist leads renewed effort to help solve Hillsborough County cold case homicides

Erin Kimmerle, associate professor of forensic anthropology and executive director of the Florida Institute for Forensic Anthropology and Applied Science at USF, is collaborating with the Hillsborough County Sheriff and Medical Examiner’s offices to help solve several cold case homicides.

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University News

USF researchers use 3D technology to preserve the history of Tampa Bay’s civil rights era

A USF researcher is partnering with the Florida Holocaust Museum to digitize several artifacts from its exhibit, “Beaches, Benches and Boycotts,” which highlights Tampa Bay’s troubled civil rights history.

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America's Fastest-Rising University

The University of South Florida is once again the fastest-rising university in America, according to U.S. News and World Report’s (U.S. News) 2021 Best Colleges rankings released today. Over the past 10 years, USF has risen 78 spots among all universities, from No. 181 to No. 103, and 54 spots among public universities from No. 100 to No. 46, more than any other university in the country. This is the second consecutive year USF is among the top 50 public universities in the nation, according to U.S. News.

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USF News

A lava tube in the El Malpais National Monument yields centuries-old insights of survival in the face of harsh climate change.

USF-led geosciences team discovers Ancestral Puebloans survived from ice melt in New Mexico lava tubes

For more than 10,000 years, the people who lived on the arid landscape of modern-day western New Mexico were renowned for their complex societies, unique architecture and early economic and political systems. But surviving in what Spanish explorers would later name El Malpais, or the “bad lands,” required ingenuity now being explained for the first time by an international geosciences team led by the University of South Florida.

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