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USF forensic anthropologist leads renewed effort to help solve Hillsborough County cold case homicides

Erin Kimmerle, associate professor of forensic anthropology and executive director of the Florida Institute for Forensic Anthropology and Applied Science at USF, is collaborating with the Hillsborough County Sheriff and Medical Examiner’s offices to help solve several cold case homicides.

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Innovation

USF Computer Science and Engineering receives grant to attract and retain more women computer scientists

The Department of Computer Science and Engineering received a three-year, $579,737 grant from the Center for Inclusive Computing at Northeastern University for funding evidence-based approaches to attract and retain more women computer science, information technology, and cybersecurity students.

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University News

USF researchers use 3D technology to preserve the history of Tampa Bay’s civil rights era

A USF researcher is partnering with the Florida Holocaust Museum to digitize several artifacts from its exhibit, “Beaches, Benches and Boycotts,” which highlights Tampa Bay’s troubled civil rights history.

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America's Fastest-Rising University

The University of South Florida is once again the fastest-rising university in America, according to U.S. News and World Report’s (U.S. News) 2021 Best Colleges rankings released today. Over the past 10 years, USF has risen 78 spots among all universities, from No. 181 to No. 103, and 54 spots among public universities from No. 100 to No. 46, more than any other university in the country. This is the second consecutive year USF is among the top 50 public universities in the nation, according to U.S. News.

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USF News & Events

USF News

USF associate professor Davide Tanasi leading the excavation of remains from a Roman cemetery in Syracuse, Sicily.

New research traces the origins of trench fever

First observed among British Expeditionary Forces in 1915, trench fever sickened an estimated 500,000 soldiers during World War I. Since then, the disease has become synonymous with the battlefield. But now, new research from an international team of scientists has uncovered evidence challenging this long-held belief.

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