Returning to Campus

Human Resources

USF employees will be returning to on-campus work in a phased approach; this includes faculty in classes and staff in offices. When planning for the return of employees to campus, units must continue to meet both business requirements and health and safety standards. USF is committed to flexibility in meeting both obligations, where reasonable circumstances permit. 

In the early phases of returning to regular on campus work, the following conditions will apply:

  • If duties can be performed remotely while still meeting business needs, then the employee should be permitted to do so/continue to do so.
  • An employee who is exhibiting COVID-19 symptoms or who is diagnosed with COVID-19 should not come to work.
  • If the duties cannot be performed remotely while still meeting business needs; then the workplace outcome depends on the reason for being unable to return to campus. See below.
  • If the employee is limited in returning to campus because of a disability, then the employee should consult with Central HR or the unit’s HR professional to consider available options for ADA reasonable accommodations or the possibility of FMLA leave, including expanded federal eligibility for leave. The university already has an infrastructure for managing these legal obligations. The supervisor should not be the primary contact for ADA and FMLA matters. 
  • If the employee is limited in returning to campus because of dependent/elder care obligations, then the employee should consult with Central HR or the unit’s HR professional to consult regarding FMLA leave, including expanded federal eligibility for leave for dependent care. The university already has an infrastructure for managing these legal obligations. The supervisor should not be the primary contact for FMLA matters. 
  • If the employee is limited in returning to campus due to the employee’s risk profile based on CDC guidance, then the employee and supervisor should explore options to adjust the work environment to support the employee’s return to on campus work, such as: flexible work schedules; alternating days in the workplace with days of remote work; hybrid performance of duties with telecommuting and in person work functions (i.e. faculty providing remote lectures with carefully managed in person labs); temporary reassignment; staggered start and end times to limit number of employees arriving or departing at the same time. 

However, presenting one or more risk factor does not necessarily equate to a disability under the ADA that would be a basis to provide a reasonable accommodation (i.e. being 65 is not a disability). If the employee is limited in returning to work due to generalized concerns unrelated to the employee’s own health or dependent/elder care circumstances, then regular leave and assignment policies should apply.